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Tyler & His Solve-a-matic Machine- Winner in the 2007 Excellent Books Category from the Prestigious iParenting Media (Future Business Leaders' Series Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Jennifer Bouani , Jennifer Shelley , Guy Smalley
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Teaching Kids how to be Entrepreneurs and Business Leaders.

Jennifer Bouani and the Gift for Writing for Children, March 30, 2007
By Grady Harp (Los Angeles, CA United States) - (AMAZON TOP 10 REVIEWER)

Every so often a new writer surfaces who along with the company of the likes of Roald Dahl, EB White, CS Lewis and others has the talent to speck to children about things adult in a manner that is not only informative and correct intelligently, but at the same time keeps in mind the importance of molding the realm of fantasy and tales that still focus the attention of all of us. Jennifer Bouani has the gift and in TYLER & HIS SOLVE-A-MATIC MACHINE she bows on stage as a skilled thinker and a consummate communicator.

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Every so often a new writer surfaces who along with the company of the likes of Roald Dahl, EB White, CS Lewis and others has the talent to speck to children about things adult in a manner that is not only informative and correct intelligently, but at the same time keeps in mind the importance of molding the realm of fantasy and tales that still focus the attention of all of us. Jennifer Bouani has the gift and in TYLER & HIS SOLVE-A-MATIC MACHINE she bows on stage as a skilled thinker and a consummate communicator. Billed as a part of a series for 'Future Business Leaders', this story is told through the palpably real ten year old orphan Tyler Sogno who dreams of sailing around the world to meet all peoples. His daydreaming for his lost sailor father distracts him form his studies and he comes up with the idea of building a machine that will make homework a snap - the Solve-a-matic machine. Tyler 'meets' the spiritual guardian Soté, the Great Spirit of the Entrepreneurs form the land of Profits, who introduces Tyler to the prospects of becoming an entrepreneur, instructing and supporting him as to how to accomplish his dream. Then with a deft hand at creating whimsy that is pertinent and smart (Tyler lives in a metropolis called 'Nessibus', a reconstructed version of 'Business' - for example) Bouani sets tasks using the elevators of skyscrapers on top of which are penthouses to aid Tyler and friends on the journey to success. In the end Soté congratulates Tyler on his perilous adventure: You have succeeded in creating your Solve-a-matic company before sunrise. You have learned many lessons along the way. You have found your confidence, learned to be organized, and devoted yourself to your work. You have learned to be resourceful and have unleashed your imagination on the world. You've learned to lead and to take risks; And the lessons learned are soundly basic and richly entertaining in the introduction of all manner of animal life and wild adventures. This book is aimed at the age 9 to 12 group, but the book is so full of well-conceived steps to take in making something of a dream that it is fodder for much older wannabe entrepreneurs! Highly sophisticated writing and a true pleasure to read. --Amazon.com Top 10 Reviewer: Grady Harp (Los Angeles, CA United States) March 2007
Fascinating book! This is a fast-moving, suspenseful adventure sure to capture the interest of intermediate-aged readers.--Dr. Darlene W. Daffin, Elementary Administrator, Trinity Presbyterian School.
--Amazon.com Top 10 Reviewer: Grady Harp (Los Angeles, CA United States) March 2007

Developing the human capital of young Americans is vital to keep America s entrepreneurial economy growing. An important goal in our kids education should be to infuse early on entrepreneurial skills, such as opportunity-recognition and risk-taking. This book contributes to this goal. The story takes the young reader on an adventure much like that of a real-life entrepreneur learning lessons in an interactive and engaging way. As Tyler works to develop his idea into a business, each problem he faces is cleverly put into a riddle, giving both Tyler and the reader an opportunity to develop creative-thinking and problem-solving skills. These are vital skills for young people to have, whether or not they end up becoming entrepreneurs. At the same time, tangible business lessons are learned, such as how to find capital, how to negotiate wages, and when to trust a business partner.  In the future, more than any time in history, in their passion to do good and do well, young people will get involved at some point in their career in a start-up.  The intellectual lessons in this book will help a new generation of entrepreneurs, so that they may be inspired to unleash their ideas and make a difference in their world.
I am totally in favor of the concept behind this first book in a series for young people about how business operations are performed. The targeted audience is children in the 9-12 age range. As long as it is properly executed, it is an idea that will prove invaluable to the future of the world. Tyler is an orphan; his father owned a boat and was killed while working on it. Since that time, his ambition has been to get his own boat so that he could travel to whatever waters his whim told him to explore. However, like everything in life, boats cost money and Tyler has none. Fortunately, he is in a wishbone pulling contest with his buddy Jake and he emerges victorious. Tyler's wish is granted, but he must work for it. The Great Spirit of the Entrepreneurs arrives and issues a challenge that he must accept and meet within a few hours. His challenges all involve solving the business problems that one faces when developing and marketing a new product. The product is the Solve-a-matic machines, which wondrously does your homework for you. The story is an excellent one for young people, not only is it fun to read, but they also learn something. Problems such as keeping your intellectual property safe, setting the price of your product, dealing with labor issues and delegating responsibility are all solved as Tyler finally achieves the boat of his dreams. There are simple riddles, animal characters such as the pirate parrots who try to steal his plans and some good friends made along the way. If this book had existed when my daughter was young enough to enjoy it, I would have insisted that she read it. --Amazon.com Top 50 Reviewer: Charles Ashbacher (Marion, Iowa United States) March 2007 --Jonathan Ortmans | Senior Fellow, Kauffman Foundation

As an organization that focuses on teaching young people about entrepreneurship, parents frequently ask us for additional resources they can use at home.  Tyler & His Solve-a-Matic Machine is an easy, fun way for parents to spark and foster children s entrepreneurial spirit.  Children relate to the engaging characters and understand that they too can make their dreams into reality.
Imaginative and fun for the bright young reader. This is a great introduction to the concept of entrepreneurship. -- John Walter Drake, Senior Partner- McCurdy & Candler Law Firm
My son related immediately to Tyler, the boy in this book, a kid who has trouble getting his homework done and spends too much time daydreaming. What kid doesn't deal with those challenges from time to time? Tyler also longs to travel the world and have great adventures. He's tired of his everyday life and he also happens to be an orphan so he feel particularly alone and hopeless. Making his dreams come true seems a very remote possibility until..one day.. Tyler finds a wishbone, makes a wish and...pooof! he gets in touch with the Great Spirit of the Entrepreneurs, who guides him as he learns the basics of becoming an entrepreneur, from his dream of a Solve-a-matic machine to actual production and sales. But first he has to find the KEYS; to get to the top of a 100 story building by a looming deadline. Can he do it? It is quite a challenge and my son wondered how Tyler was going to meet the challenge. While on his adventure, Tyler develops skills useful to all budding business people, including patience, confidence, problem-solving, flexibility, trying alternative solutions, marketing his product and much more. My son was riveted by the various mysteries and puzzles Tyler had to solve to get the KEYS; to get to the top of a hundred story building. Along the way, he learns the basics of becoming a successful entrepreneur and my son and I discussed those skills as we read this book. It is written in such a lively and fun style that I'm not even sure he realized how much he was learning! Unlike many financial or business books written for children, this one approaches kids from their level - with an engaging story, plenty of mystery and suspense and a thorough look at what it takes to go from budding entrepreneur to having a solid business plan. I asked my son what he thought of the book when we finished it and he said; I learned about what it takes to succeed in business and that you should be patient, do your research and stick with it. You can't give up easily and you have to know how to market what you make; I was impressed. --Amazon.com Top 100 Reviewer: By K. Corn (Indianapolis,, IN United States) - June 2006 --Jack Harris | President, Junior Achievement of Georgia

About the Author

Jennifer Bouani is an advocate for young entrepreneurs. Bouani comes from a family of entrepreneurs. She started working in her dad's business at the young age of 12 years old. In 1995, she graduated Summa Cum Laude from Auburn University with a degree in Computer Engineering. She has been a project manager, business analyst manager, a business communications professional, and a consultant. Jennifer has expertise in multiple industries: retail, insurance, automotive, telecommunications, consulting, publishing among others. Bouani is the author of the #1 Amazon Kindle Bestseller and Award Winning Book Tyler and His Solve-a-matic Machine and the Future Business Leaders' Series. She mentors parents, educators, community leaders on how to empower and prepare kids for tomorrow's world by teaching them how to think creatively, explore products and services around them, set realistic goals, and overcome obstacles -- the keys to turning what they love to do into business ideas and realizing their dreams. The series is available in Korean. Awards: Tyler & His Solve-a-matic Machine (Future Business Leaders Series) Disney's Winner in the 2007 Excellent Books Category from the Prestigious iParenting Media. The Future Business Leaders Series has been awarded the Gold by the Mom's Choice Awards The Future Business Leaders Series is the winner of The New England Festival of Books. The Future Business Leaders Series received an Honorable Mention at the London Festival of Books. Entrepreneurship is the backbone of our economy, yet entrepreneurship is not a subject kids are actively taught. That is what makes Bouani's series so important. She is teaching kids about an important concept and delivers valuable lessons in a fun and engaging way. The Future Business Leaders' Series prepares kids for the changing economy and gets them excited about entrepreneurship. Natalie MacNeil | Founder of SheTakesOnTheWorld.com and Co-founder of GarageEntrepreneurs.com I love the concept of this book--that it plants an entrepreneurial seed in kids' minds, and shows them they have the power to solve their own problems. As a child, I was constantly told I could do anything and be anything. If I had read this book back then, I can only imagine the ideas it would have sparked. Kudos to Jennifer Bouani for writing such an important book! Shelly Roche

Product Details

  • File Size: 577 KB
  • Print Length: 146 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0977926524
  • Publisher: Bouje Publishing; 1 edition (May 28, 2006)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B001A5UKFO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #678,024 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poorly written May 30, 2009
Format:Paperback
My daughter and I read this selection for a book club. We were horrified by the number of errors in the text. Punctuation was often missing, period and question marks were misused and there was incorrect wording, such as "a orange" instead of "an orange." It may teach kids entrepreneurial skills, but not good writing skills. If a company wants to be trusted it had better market itself with correct grammar. I have a hard time believing the previously posted reviews. Could it be that this savvy marketer has paid people to promote this book? The story is weak and insulting to anyone age 9 and older. If Jennifer Bouani truly wants to teach kids about the business world, she should strive for excellence.
Was this review helpful to you?
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Writing Style August 13, 2006
By Millie
Format:Paperback
I read the book to my class over a period of two weeks and they loved it, from the characters to the riddles. The kids have all agreed to write business plans based on what they captured fom the story. We all can't wait for your next hit.

Millie Naston
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Give your child an edge, GET this BOOK NOW!! September 6, 2006
Format:Paperback
The author did three things that were GREAT:

* Painted a picture for the young reader so they can imagine themselves in it

* A story line that gives the reader an adventure that keeps them hooked

* Gave the reader inspiration to not give up and a valuable lesson in business
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Engaging Story August 5, 2006
Format:Paperback
This is what my kid Ryan said of the book "The story is so great. It is set in this magical city called Nessibus. The characters are awesome and fun, I laughed hard and felt what they were going through. The story is full of riddles cool! You must read it to see how great it is"
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Capitalism, distilled enjoyably. May 11, 2007
Format:Paperback
Jennifer Bouani, Tyler and His Solve-a-Matic Machine (Bouje, 2006)

The idea of kids' books teaching libertarian values is one near and dear to my heart. Unfortunately, I've never actually found one that gets it entirely right; the author either softpedals the values and mixes in some of the usual left-leaning kids'-book malarkey or overstates the case and ends up writing something more polemic than kids' book. Tyler and His Solve-a-Matic Machine, however, is as close as I've found to a book that manages to keep its balance.

More than anything, it put me in mind of Norton Juster's The Phantom Tollbooth in its writing style. Bouani, like Juster before her, creates an entirely believable character and then thrusts him into an entirely unbelievable situation (and for much the same reason). Tyler, our hero, is ten years old. Like most kids, he's not fond of homework, but unlike most kids, he's actually got some ideas in his head about a machine that will help. There are forces who are willing to help him build his machine, but first they must teach him the basics of being an entrepreneur.

First things first: let's get the bad stuff out of the way, and when I say "bad stuff," I mean two minor niggles. First, the font in which the book is typeset is non-standard, and can take a while to get used to, so be prepared. Second, if you're a unionist, prepare to be absolutely outraged. Tyler and his friends' solution to the problem of the striking union members is the kind of thing that got people killed in the seventies. (Needless to say, it's also the correct answer.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Every so often a new writer surfaces who along with the company of the likes of Roald Dahl, EB White, CS Lewis and others has the talent to speck to children about things adult in a manner that is not only informative and correct intelligently, but at the same time keeps in mind the importance of molding the realm of fantasy and tales that still focus the attention of all of us. Jennifer Bouani has the gift and in TYLER & HIS SOLVE-A-MATIC MACHINE she bows on stage as a skilled thinker and a consummate communicator.

Billed as a part of a series for 'Future Business Leaders', this story is told through the palpably real ten year old orphan Tyler Sogno who dreams of sailing around the world to meet all peoples. His daydreaming for his lost sailor father distracts him form his studies and he comes up with the idea of building a machine that will make homework a snap - the Solve-a-matic machine. Tyler 'meets' the spiritual guardian Soté, the Great Spirit of the Entrepreneurs form the land of Profits, who introduces Tyler to the prospects of becoming an entrepreneur, instructing and supporting him as to how to accomplish his dream. Then with a deft hand at creating whimsy that is pertinent and smart (Tyler lives in a metropolis called 'Nessibus', a reconstructed version of 'Business' - for example) Bouani sets tasks using the elevators of skyscrapers on top of which are penthouses to aid Tyler and friends on the journey to success.

In the end Soté congratulates Tyler on his perilous adventure: "You have succeeded in creating your Solve-a-matic company before sunrise. You have learned many lessons along the way. You have found your confidence, learned to be organized, and devoted yourself to your work.
Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Introduction to Business for All Ages
Tyler Sogno lives in an orphanage. Tyler dreams of being a boat captain, but he is unable to see how he will be able to make that dream come true. Read more
Published on February 21, 2011 by Lonnie E. Holder
2.0 out of 5 stars children's book
My 9 year old son and I have been reading this book. The story is a little far fetched and sort of hard to follow. He loves to read but does not seem to be into this book.
Published on January 17, 2011 by Ginger Castle
5.0 out of 5 stars A real attention getter for kids who are bored with reading!
This book is excellent for anyone who absolutely despises reading and hates to come home to do homework even worse. Read more
Published on May 29, 2010 by K. Busby
5.0 out of 5 stars The Horatio Alger of the 21st Century
Horatio Alger and his many imitators tried to teach kids the secrets of success in business as what we would now call entrepreneurs at the tail end of the 19th Century and the... Read more
Published on February 20, 2010 by fredtownward
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for kids
This is a very inventive and brilliantly written book about a young orphaned boy who invents a machine to do his homework and embarks on an adventure in a fantasy sky-scraper where... Read more
Published on August 29, 2007 by Seth J. Frantzman
5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, educational, inspirational -- an absolutely brilliant...
It's one thing to have a great idea, but it's something else to take that idea and truly bring it to life - but that's just what Jennifer Bouani has done in this first book of the... Read more
Published on April 24, 2007 by Daniel Jolley
4.0 out of 5 stars Teaching older children the basic concepts of entrepreneurship
This is a fantasy adventure story for children between, say, 9 & 12. However, it isn't just a fantasy adventure story. Read more
Published on April 6, 2007 by Craig Matteson
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read and a wonderful story.
What makes a great book? What is that, that will capture a child's attention and make him read a 120 page book in less than 2 hours? Read more
Published on April 2, 2007 by Michael J Woznicki
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent business primer for a child
I am totally in favor of the concept behind this first book in a series for young people about how business operations are performed. Read more
Published on March 29, 2007 by Charles Ashbacher
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Coulson says, "Kids are Natural Entrepreneurs"
You spammed your book all over Amazon, inviting discussion when you obviously had no intention of actually replying to the people who took the time to answer your questions. How about showing up for the discussions YOU started?
Mar 21, 2008 by Oregongirl |  See all 2 posts
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