Macroevolution: Pattern and Process

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0801857355
ISBN-10: 080185735X
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Paperback, May 26, 1998
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Stanley offers an imaginative treatment of almost every issue in macroevolution; by drawing on a wealth of paleontological and neontological information and on the mechanistic theory of evolution, he achieves a clear, informative, stimulating synthesis. This is perhaps the most important treatment of macroevolution in almost thirty years, and revivifies a subject too long dormant." -- Douglas J. Futuyama, American Scientist



"Not only is a wealth of evidence presented to support the model of punctuated equilibria, but Stanley's stream of refreshing insights into classic topics of evolution, such as living fossils, mass extinctions and adaptive radiations add further weight to the validity of the general model." -- Simon Conway Morris, Geological Magazine

Book Description

A paleontologist presents new evidence in favor the evolution by "punctuated equilibria."

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 370 pages
  • Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press (May 26, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080185735X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801857355
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,230,917 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sam Windbeutel, PhD, PG on December 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book, although somewhat dated, provides an excellent look at the broad trends of evolution through the eyes of a leading Johns Hopkins paleontologist. Stanley examines explains the modern synthesis, fossil evidence, speciation and extinction rates, quantum speciation, large-scale trends, and the dynamics of species turnover. Among the groups examined are gastropods, echinoids, corals, microfossils, graptolites, and vertebrates.
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Format: Paperback
Steven M. Stanley (born 1941) is an American paleontologist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, who is probably best known for his empirical research documenting the evolutionary process of punctuated equilibrium in the fossil record. (His 1981 book The New Evolutionary Timetable has a more "popular" presentation of the more technical material in this 1979 book.)

He states in the Preface, "I have come to believe that paleontological data tell us things about evolution that have not gained general acceptance through the collective biologic effort known as the Modern Synthesis. The fossil record, in certain places and for certain purposes, is more instructive in the field of evolution than many have believed. Here, perhaps, is the fundamental message of this book."

He states, "the role of paleontology in evolutionary research has been defined narrowly because of a false belief, tracing back to Darwin and his early followers, that the fossil record is woefully incomplete. Actually, the record is of sufficiently high quality to allow us to undertake certain kinds of analysis meaningfully at the level of the species. Such analysis shows that many ideas now enjoying widespread support among biologists are in need of re-examination." (pg. 1)

He states, "the fossil records offers little promise for extensive documentation of quantum speciation." (Pg. 47) With regard to the bear-to-panda transition, he suggests, "In fact, it seems possible that a single event of quantum speciation accomplished the transition." (pg.
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By Cleveland A. Winge on May 25, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
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