Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: VBA and Macros for Microsoft Excel
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on November 20, 2015
Good reference if you are really using Excel VBA. Not for the timid.
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on October 22, 2014
Learnt almost everything that I know about VBA from this book.
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on August 24, 2013
Not detailed enough and not very helpful for people who want to pick a few skills quickly to capture best practices.
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on August 8, 2012
This book was not as completed as I'd hoped. It seemed to rely on examples and expansions of those examples, but none of them even approximated the application I need. It comes somewhat short as a reference book as well. It did contain enough to get me going, but most questions I had were answered by trial and error.
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on June 12, 2011
I have experience writing programs in procedural code but have never been able to grasp the VBA macro language. If you are in this situation, I would recommend this book. It starts off with an analogy of how you would say "Kick the ball" in VBA code. It continues to show how you would add adjectives and adverbs such as "kick the soccer ball hard". I found this extremely helpful.

The book is filled with working examples of VBA code. One of the examples was for the a process that I had tried to write vba code for but couldn't. I would recommend this book to people who have some programming experience but little to no experience with VBA macro programming.
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on November 18, 2010
Great book to work with VBA and macros. This book gives a good background of the concepts and many examples. Thanks a lot!!
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on April 4, 2010
My aim was to get a structured introduction to the VBA programming in order to create macros that would be useful for my own specific needs. It was a little late when I realized that this book wouldn't do it. The introduction to VBA is okay, but then the author jumps from one topic to another without a logical structure. Although there are very good Macro examples in the book, they are for specific cases and cannot really be tailored to one's specific needs unless the reader already possesses some VBA knowledge.
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on August 25, 2009
I received the book as expected. There're no problem with package or even with the book.
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on November 20, 2008
I recommend this book for anyone who uses VBA to automate tasks. This book advanced my self-taught trial and error skills immensely and I use the techniques daily.
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on July 2, 2008
If I could give 0 stars, I would.

This book is poorly written and poorly edited...and I have the version "Reprinted with corrections." Flipping through it in the bookstore, it seemed promising - enough so that I actually bought it. After three chapters, however, I am ready to throw in the towel.

This is a technical book. It's about programming. It contains examples of actual code. The examples have to be correct to have any credibility. Once you lose that, every line becomes suspect. Let me provide you just a few examples.

On page 32, the colorindex for "yellow" is given as "6"; on page 33 it is "30".
On page 41, "Selection is actually a property and not an object." When I reach page 50, "Selection" has become an object again.
On page 62, in the third example within Table 3.1, the delimiting comma is inside the quotes.
On 67, " Notice that that the offset..."
Also on that page, the resizing example at the bottom is wrong. If I have a column and add two more to it, I end up with three. Maybe Mr. Excel is using a higher level of math when he says "Range("Produce").Resize(,2) and says "Remember, the number you resize by is the TOTAL number of rows and/or columns you want to include."

What really rolled my eyes back in my head was on page 63, when I encountered .range(.range, range) with insufficient introduction. A relatively simple statement with a single range reference suddenly morphed into a triple range reference with an indecipherable comment about "an extra range at the beginning of the code line." This makes absolutely no sense, and coupled with the authoring or editing miscues mentioned earlier, it is not even possible to determine if this is a typo or simply a badly written passage.

Whether I ultimately can gain any value from this book remains to be seen - assuming I am able to actually make sense of the content. For me, it was a total waste of the purchase price.
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