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on May 24, 2015
Good book and seller
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on April 12, 2015
Great book and service.
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on April 8, 2013
Great condition, for our company library, I can't inform you if it's great to listen to for no one has checked this out yet.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 4, 2012
This book is less a look at the macro-economic effects of 'wikinomics' and more a work of futurism, contemplating how great life will be after everything embraces the concept. Reminds me of The Singularity Is Near in its pollyannish optimism. The Singularity, however, takes a much deeper and systematic approach to thinking about future events, while MacroWikinomics almost always provides the most simple, straightforward take on how macrowikinomics could solve each of the world's major problems.
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on December 2, 2012
interesting concept. deep and different with other people. author has adjusted from previous version. however, the rule is set by people...
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on December 1, 2011
Both books in the series were inspirational to me as an entrepreneur. I read the first one prior to starting my business and this book has inspired countless ideas for it. I understand several of the reviewers found a lot of the material didn't apply to them, presumably because a healthcare chapter was of less interest to someone focused on the environment, for example. But to me, it's applying lessons from one industry to another that is precisely the source of inspiration. Biobricks is applying open source software concepts to synthetic biology? Fascinating! Now can those newly constructed organisms help swallow up carbon from the atmosphere? Bam! Cross-over from software to healthcare to the environment.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Welcome to your new world, courtesy of the digital revolution. Sorry, but you won't be able to skate by as a passive, disinterested observer. Figuratively, the Internet is forcing you to get involved. Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams focus on how the online community's "mass collaboration" is changing political and civic institutions. In this follow-up to their bestseller "Wikinomics", the authors explain why technology and social media may hold the answers to some of the world's most pressing problems. Written in a witty, sharp style, their book covers the Web 2.0 waterfront, describing how groups in industry, education, science, finance, medicine and government are creating value from "networked intelligence." getAbstract recommends this cogent, all-encompassing guide to the digital future but warns readers of "Wikinomics" to brace themselves for some repetition. Start reading soon, because change is accelerating every second.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 28, 2011
Macrowikinomics is not just another business book looking to popularize a new buzzword or capitalize on an existing one. After all, the term "wikinomics" has been around since the authors published their first book of that name back in 2006. If they were going to capitalize on the popularity of the original book they would have rushed a sequel out in true Hollywood fashion. Macrowikinomics was not even the original title of this book. It was re-named through submissions on Don Tapscott's blog when he asked for suggestions (I know because I participated in that exercise). After many, many title ideas "Macrowikinomics" turned out to be the most fitting for this follow up since it takes the concepts of the first book and expands on them, discussing how the larger application of wikinomics can transform the very institutions that make society run. It's an exciting look at the full potential of mass collaboration, providing a unique vision of the future that alone is worth the price of admission.

It's not a book that you'll breeze through half paying attention, and forget its content afterwards. To appreciate Macrowikinomics you're going to have to really sink your teeth into it and open up your mind to a realm of new possibilities. If that's not for you then I wouldn't recommend it, but if you're willing to take that deep dive it's worth the ride. The material can be a bit dense at times and admittedly the case studies that make up the middle (and majority of the book) can become a bit tiresome at times -- not because they're boring or written poorly, but because you get the sense while reading them that they're all leading to a remarkable payoff at the end and you'd rather be reading that.

Each of these middle sections dive into how macrowikinomics can be applied to the foundations of modern society -- education, health care, government, media, etc. (with multiple chapters for each). On their own, these sections are a fascinating look at how the principles of wikinomics can improve the particular institution the chapter is about. But when compiled chapter after chapter the book starts to feel a bit 'heavy' and my reading slowed down. Perhaps those segments should have been shorter or comprised of less chapters in each, but if they were you know someone would complain that the authors didn't have enough meat behind their theories, so I can see why they put it all in.

But like I said, it's still worth the investment in your time. The authors particularly shine at the beginning and end of the book; at the beginning when they talk about this being a turning point in history, setup the concept of macrowikinomics (and review the principles of wikinomics originally presented in the first book) and speak about its potential holistically, rather than the individual scenarios that follow, and at the end when they bring it all together in one vision. If I had grown a bit tired of the content in the middle I definitely perked up during the last section (comprised of two chapters). I completely agree with another reviewer that these are the two most valuable chapters of the book, especially for those that read their first book. The last two chapters deliver on the payoff I mentioned above. They do what the book was meant for. They suck you into this vision for a new future and inspire you to be a part of it. The second to last chapter may be called "Making Wikinomics happen in your organization" but it's light on details for such a name. Again, it's more about inspiring you to make that difference in your organization than providing you step by step directions.

Many of the reviews here complain about the book's overall lack of details about how to actually implement what they're talking about, whether it's in the chapter I just referred to, or in the middle chapters that focus on specific institutions. While that occurred to me while reading it, I was not as bothered as other reviewers. This is more of a manifesto than a manual (indeed the authors refer to it as such). It's meant to inspire us to think about new possibilities and to want to make macrowikinomics a reality. The authors probably don't know all the details of how to implement this vision. And that's ok. It's a relatively new field. We're still exploring the possibilities of mass collaboration that new social tools have only recently made possible. It's up to us -- those who believe in this vision -- to do the work and figure out how to make it happen. Tapscott and Williams present enough information to get us started. If they're guilty of anything it's being too idealistic. The book will sometimes have you questioning if the principles of wikinomics can really solve all these problems. It probably would have benefited from a little more focus on its potential shortcomings to help balance out the idealism.

Regardless, I'm still glad they had the courage to put these ideas out there. It is, after all, a very ambitious work they have attempted. I do agree with the authors that we are at a crossroads in history and that our institutions are no longer able to support us the way they did. Change they must and I believe as the authors do that harnessing the power of Web 2.0 / social collaboration can help lead us to that new future.

Although long and repetitive at times, no other authors have put a vision out there for remodelling society as comprehensively as Tapscott and Williams have. For that alone, this is an important book. If the book's purpose is to get people on board with the idea that this is the direction we must head as a society, then it has succeeded. Sign me up!

Full disclosure: I received a free copy of the book when Don Tapscott spoke to an organization I belong to.
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on March 24, 2011
Book not that great. The overriding message is good, but very repetitive and hard to stay engaged.
I bought two--one for myself and another as a door prize. But it's a bit boring for a door prize.
I bought this in audio because I find little time for reading & listen to these business books during commute. Could not get thru it---simply too much talking--like an academic paper presented by a professor. Monitone and boring, hard to get the main points, they are so fine--not sharp. Shrinking it down and covering key points is less miopic detail would make it better.

Service from Amazon to purchase and receive--exceptional and 5star. Not the book or the reader.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2011
Firstly, let me say that I loved Wikinomics and was eagerly looking forward to this book, so perhaps I'm a victim of my high expectations.

However, he spends most of the book lecturing about Global warming and saying things like "The US fought two wars in Iraq to maintain control of Middle Eastern Oil." If you believe crap like that, and have a leftist bent, you'll love this book.

He has some good examples, but it's not really new.

He is right about the need to create new models to govern the world, but just don't preach to me so much, Sheesh!

Also the audio for the audio book is SOOO.SLOW. . . .I'm listening to it on double speed and only sounds slightly speeded up.
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