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558 of 590 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2010
Here is a quick video review of the Cyborg R.A.T. 7 gaming mouse.
review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image review image
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102 of 113 people found the following review helpful
on July 20, 2010
If I don't cover one of the coolest features of this mouse first, I'll forget:
- The thumb shelf changes the game. I had no idea how much drag my thumb would provide and how it interfered with the smooth control of my games. The thumb shelf on the R.A.T. 7 is the perfect size to hold my fat thumb and keep it out of the way.

Continuing on - this will be the first mouse to replace my almost-perfect Logitech from 1999. The Logitech was heavy, had a nice, tactile wheel, moved very smoothly and had a responsive, easy-to-clean mouseball. Yeah, no optics for me.

The R.A.T. 7 starts light and is adjustable up to HEAVY. The solid chunk of stamped aluminum that acts as the frame peeks out from all the adjustable nooks and crannies and holds all the assemblies tightly. The feet glide smoother than any other mouse I've used. The adjustable palm rest is perfect, even if you like a shorter grip. The pinkie shelf was a nice addition, too, until I found that it interfered with play. No problem - I can use the stock pinkie assembly, but I took the whole thing off for an even better configuration taht fits my grip.

The DPI is suffficient for noticeably smoother control, and the on-the-fly DPI adjustment button at the thumb is an innovation I never thought I'd use. Until I started rockin' fools with it in MW2.

The best way to think about this mouse is this way: what else do you have for your PC that will last ten years? And grow or shrink to fit your gaming style over that whole decade? Not even your monitor is this adjustable...

Oh, and there's the fabric-wrapped cord and the removable adjustment tool and the horizontal scroll wheel and the tin that comes with the extra thumb and pinkie plates and the container for the weights and the configuration software and... phew!
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
on November 20, 2011
When i first used the mouse, i thought i had found the perfect mouse for pc gaming. It fit my hand perfectly, fixed my pinkie drag, and even weighed exactly how much i wanted it to wiegh (adjustable weights). Then about 2 months later it just didnt track. The cursor would not move even though the right click and left click still worked. I tried blasting canned air where the diode is, repulgging it, and even tried it on other computers but nothing showed the least bit of hope.
I wish I would've listened to others who had the same issue...
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi -I'm glad you enjoyed the RAT 7! Sorry to hear the laser didn't last as long as it should have. Our technical support department handles all issues like this. You can email my associate in support, Josh, for immediate assistance. His email is jharford@madcatz.com.

For future reference, our support team can be reached Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 4 PM Pacific Standard Time, at 1-(800)659-2287. You can also submit a ticket on http://support.madcatz.com for help with issues like this. All of our items come with a manufacturer's warranty to ensure they last as long as they should. Thanks for your feedback!
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on November 15, 2010
Both my relaxation (gaming, web surfing, blogging) and my job (writing) often require a great deal of mousing. About five years ago, I developed serious RSIs in both hands and wrists, so for me, ergonomics are paramount. My hands are rather small though, which has made getting the right furniture and equipment difficult. Over the years, I've used a great many alternative mice/pointing-devices. Trackballs. The 3M upright mouse. The WOWPen -- this last actually the best of the bunch until, after seeing a few reviews, I decided to take the plunge and get the R.A.T. 7.

I went with the wired model because I didn't like the R.A.T. 9's proprietary battery, and its claim of "only" needing a swap every couple of days under normal use. (They don't list replacement batteries as being available as accessories, so what does one do after the provided batteries don't hold their charge?) Besides, the wire isn't that big a hassle to me anyway.

A mostly nice out-of-box experience, although I had some trouble separating the RAT from its plastic packaging. The installation went smoothly, with the usual "install drivers/software, plug in device when prompted" sequence.

The real joy though was fiddling with the customization options, and over the last week, I must've tried every single alternate part, weight variation, and position alternative. Eventually, I settled onto having the pinkie shelf installed, 2 of the 5 weights, the original palm rest left as is, and the thumb shelf shifted both forward and pivoted out about 2/3 of the way. (On edit a few weeks later: I swapped the original palm rest for the knobby one. Makes it easier to keep my hand in position, I've found.) Although I don't "claw" my mouse, this arrangement affords me a nice secure grip, with a comfortable hand spread and no more awkward pinkie dragging.

After some issues with the profile programming, I followed the Support link on the software over to the main Saitek website and downloaded the latest drivers and software -- which solved those problems (commands not displaying, changes not taking). One detail I really liked, in addition to the programming, multiple profiles with 3 modes per profile, was the ability both to set the four resolution levels (both X and Y axes), and the on-the-fly button on the mouse to change resolution. For instance, when doing normal computer work, I keep the mouse on Setting 3 (3200x3200), but when playing Fallout New Vegas, I like to crank that down to Setting 2 (1600) for more precision.

One particular endorsement is that my spouse saw me using my new mouse and decided to get one, too. And she almost NEVER likes new things. She has her RAT set up very differently than mine, but she's said she likes it very much. Her favorite feature is the ability to change resolution, which is essential when she's doing Photoshop work, but also helpful in game playing. She plays Ultima Online (yes, it's still around), and double-clicks are a huge part of the game. So she programmed the scroll wheel button to do a double-click.

Oh and a suggestion: For those who've said they want more variability and precision on the weights, not just 6g increments? Take one of the weights to your local hardware store and buy a bunch of steel or brass washers of roughly the same diameter and size; just make sure the inside hole is the same or slightly larger diameter, so it will fit onto the weight holder shaft. Mix and match to get the weight you want.

Cons:
- In-Box software may not be the most current, and seems to have issues; go to the Saitek main site for an updated version. Trust me on this. The latest-latest version seems to have fixed most of the bugs people were complaining about.
- Does the adjustment tool really need to be ON the mouse? It does stick out the back awkwardly when the palm rest is completely retracted. Given how rarely I use it after the initial set-up, I removed the tool and put it in the parts tin.
- The mode-switching button is awkward to press, and surprisingly stiff compared to all the other buttons.

Pros:
- Extremely customizable as far as form-factor goes. It's the first time I've had a mouse adjust to really fit my hand, as opposed to me making my hand fit the mouse.
- The software has room for improvement, including more features and customization options, but it's still way more than I used to have (which with the WOWPen was nothing at all -- it depended entirely on the OS mouse support).
- Advanced programming, including macros and mouse actions.
- Seems way more precise in pointing than my previous mice and trackballs.
- Love the 'sniper' button, and the on-the-fly settings for four different resolution levels.
- The scroll wheel is very nice and well-textured.
- Overall the mouse feels solid to me, not at all cheap or poorly made. I even liked the braided cable, as it doesn't flop around or make noise on my desktop like my previous mouse.

Meh:
- It would be nice if the software also allowed for programming of the right and left mouse buttons and the vertical scroll wheel itself (not just the button push from it), as well as for combination clicks (left and right mouse button at the same time).
- As others have noted, I do find myself wishing there were one or two more buttons on the thumb-panel. And/or that the 'sniper' button could be reprogrammed to some other function.
- The right and left mouse buttons are very sensitive, with little travel, and coming off other mice which required more deliberate pressure to activate, I'm still accidentally twitching button presses. (On edit after several weeks: Inadvertent button presses are very infrequent now, although not completely gone. I figure within a month or two, I'll be fully acclimated.)
- Programming instructions could be more clear and detailed; better still to include some sample configs based on common usage and/or popular games (some of this is available on the website, but you have to hunt for it).

Would I buy this mouse again? Absolutely. Would I recommend it to others, especially those with ergonomic issues? Yes. (On edit: After using this mouse for a while, I've found it a joy to use, and paired with an XTrac Ripper oversized mouse-pad, it glides like ice. Despite reports from some that a black mousepad can have issues with this mouse, it hasn't been the case for me at all.)
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53 of 66 people found the following review helpful
on December 21, 2011
I wish I could have written a better review. I really wanted to love this mouse.

THE GOOD POITNS FIRST:

- horizontal thumb scroll wheel. All mice should have this. This should be as ubiquitous as the vertical scroll wheel has become. This is the simplest and best way to do horizontal scrolling. I've always found the tilt wheel to lack precision when scrolling. This is, by far, the best feature of the mouse and almost got me to keep it despite its problems.

- adjustable thumb rest. I have small hands, but I can adjust to almost any size mouse, large or small, but just gripping further forward or back on the mouse. The one thing I can't adjust, though, is where my thumb goes. That's why I love the adjustable length thumb rest. I can grip the mouse where I like and the thumb buttons are always there.

- dedicated precision booster button. This frees up the other two buttons to use as forward and back. On other mice, you have to sacrifice one in order to program it with this function.

- While not unique to this mouse, the three on-the-fly programmable settings are great. My previous mouse was a Microsoft, and they have the ability to automatically set profiles associated with each program, but to me, that's not as good a solution. Sometimes, I like having multiple profiles even within the same program because there just aren't enough buttons on the mouse (and I feel that adding too many more buttons would wind up having its own set of problems).

NOT GREAT, BUT NOT TERRIBLE:

- As mentioned above, there is no way to automatically set profiles so that they initiate when you open a certain program (like when you open a particular game). You have to manually change profiles, which isn't a big deal, but for one of the highest priced mice available, I feel like its software should have kept up with competitors'.

- Interchangeable grips. The pinkie grip with the built in rest is nice, but you should know that neither the thumb rest (which you can't take out) or the pinky rest have feet. They float above your mousing surface. That means there's the chance, depending on how you use the mouse, that the mouse could tilt on you. That's not a problem for most people, but since this is a gaming mouse, it seems like a glaring oversight not to put feet on these "wings" since if this happens even once to a hardcore gamer, the chances are this mouse is going in the closet or the garbage can.

- DPI adjustments are done with a rocker switch. There are four DPI settings, so it's a total of three button presses to change from the lowest to highest setting or vice versa. I prefer a dedicated button for each setting so you only need one button press to change DPI settings. For most people, this won't be a big deal, but again, in a hardcore gaming situation, there is a huge difference between one and three button presses.

- The left and right click buttons are very easy to press; there is very little resistance. It's a problem on this mouse because whenever you press a button that isn't the left or right click (especially the precision aim button), the rest of your fingers will need to grip the mouse slightly tighter to brace against the button push. This might also be a problem for anyone who ever picks up a mouse and sets it back down to make small position adjustments. Admittedly, the pinky and/or thumb in any of these cases should do most of the bracing, but I can't help but add just a tiny amount of additional pressure with my index and middle (or ring) finger, and on this mouse, that means one--or both--of the main buttons gets clicked. Most mice I've used, gaming or otherwise, have a slightly higher resistance so that the buttons can't get pushed accidentally. Some people might actually like this feature since it means you can rapidly click the buttons without tiring your muscles too fast, but again, even other gaming mice I've tried have a higher resistance than this.

NOW FOR THE BAD:

- The programming software just isn't good. The precision aim button is supposed to be programmable, and it was... for about a week. Suddenly, it's no longer holding it's programmed setting. The button phyiscally works (it still lowers DPI temporarily), but it can no longer perform anything other than its default purpose. I considered living with the button essentially being unprogrammable, but it bothers me that on a high end mouse, one priced at or above other top-of-line mice, the software/drivers have this kind of issue.

- The software also lacks a great deal of functions I'd expect to see in a high end mouse. For instance, you can't assign any other button to act as the precision aimer. That feature is only available to the precision aim button. You also can't directly have windows detect the horizontal scroll wheel as being a horizontal scroll. You can assign the left and right arrow keys to it, and that will get you most of the same functionality (it will scroll most webpages and Windows folders), but some features are lost. For example, a true horizontal scroll will let you scroll through the tabs in Firefox, but the left and right arrow keys do not. Also, you can assign a button to act as a key depression only on a single click. This means that, for example, you can set it to depress the space bar on one click and behave as if you're holding down the spacebar even though you're not holding down the button. They, on a second push of the button, it will release the space bar. That's fine, but you're stuck with that setting for the entire profile. Each profile has three program settings for the buttons. No matter what keys or functions you assign to a button for the three settings, if you choose to use this "always press" feature in one setting in a profile, you have to keep that for the otehr two settings for that profile. Again, for a high-end mouse, this is not great, and it's indicative of the overall problem with the programming software: the software appears to be designed universally for all Cyborg products. This saves them the cost of maintaining multiple software, but it means compromises have to be made. I don't like paying this much for compromise.

- The comfort on the mouse itself is awful. The primary reason I bought the mouse was that my previous mouse (a Microsoft Sidewinder x8) wasn't very comfortable. Even there, it was my wrist position that gave me problems because the mouse was so big for my hand. In the hand itself, the x8 felt like any comfortable mouse should: like it wasn't even there. With the R.A.T., you'll always know it's there. The adjustable palm rest can slide in and out to change the overall length of the mouse. While great in theory, the problem is that whenever it's at anything but the "smallest" setting, there is a gap between the palm rest and the front section of the mouse. I didn't think that would matter, but when I put the thing in my hand, that gap makes a huge difference. The weight of your hand, wrist and (depending on how you hold the mouse) your forearm is no longer evenly distributed over your hand. Because of that seemingly insignificant gap, the heel of your palm bears most of the weight. It caused soreness in that part of my hand within minutes, and it doesn't go away for hours.

It doesn't help that the interchangeable palm rests, even the ones that are lower in profile, are elevated above the arc-line that should be created by the rest of the mouse. Imagine, on most modern mice, the profile of the mouse when you look at it from the side and eye level. Almost all comfortable mice form some kind of arc. On the R.A.T., if you start at the front of the mouse and trace this arc, you'll notice that the interchangeable palm rest does not fit into the line of that arc, it jumps up a good quarter of an inch. Even if you push the palm rest all the way in (its smallest setting), you'll see that it is about an eighth to a quarter inch above where it should be. This difference in elevation, while small, also causes the heel of your palm to bear more weight not matter what length setting you use on the palm rest. It occured to me that with the way they designed this, it's impossible to avoid this issue with all settings. If you pull the mouse out to its longest setting, the palm rest, because it's in a different position relative to the rest of the mouse, is in line with that imaginary arc line. The problem there is that you still have this aforementioned gap between the palm and the fingers.

It occured to me that what they should have done was limit the palm rest to three length adjustment settings and have a palm rest for each setting. That way, they could contour the palm rest to be the appropriate height for that setting and make each rest long enough to fill in that gap between the palm and fingers. What Cyborg went with instead is to have two rests with the same texture but different heights and one rest with the higher height and a rougher texture. Those are far less useful than having a palm rest meld with the lines of the mouse.

SUMMARY:

I feel like I'm in an abusive relationship with this mouse: it keeps hurting me, and I want it to stop so we can still be together. There's even a kid involved (my son loves this mouse). But ultimately, I've decided it's best for all of us to part ways. The software is not high end (and I fault Saitek for this as I've used various products of theirs for ten years and they haven't done enough to improve it over that time), the ergonomics isn't comfortable and the customizeable features feel too generic to be truly customizeable. Most mice are one-size-fits all. This is ultimately a mid-range gaming mouse that is priced at the high end mostly because it's marketed as custom-tailored to your hand. But ultimately, I'm paying a premium only to go from one-size-fits-all to three-sizes-fit-all (three being the number of palm and pinky rests available), and that just doesn't seem worth the extra price since I'm only ever going to use one of those three sizes, and none of them fit me comfortably.
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40 of 50 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2010
After following this mouse on the web and seeing it's weirdness on Youtube and the Cyborg site. I have to say that I'm more than surprised. Ignore what most people are saying about the sensor, I've picked up the mouse a few times and with any mouse it's going to move a little, even with my G9 and crappy 5 dollar everyday usage mouse, re-aim you crappy players who like to complain and blame a mouse! I'm using a big mousepad, the metal one from Cyborg's site with dual side covering, and the dual DPI setting works great. Play tested it with Global Agenda for the past few hours and it feels great. The sniper button is adjustable to how fast or slow you want to make the DPI setting in comparable to your mouse DPI, other words, if your DPI setting for shooting without scope is set to 3000, but when you scope, you can adjust it at 50% (default) so it's down to 1500, then you can adjust more or less depending if you want the sniper mode to be faster or slower based on a percentage to your current DPI setting. So if you go up to 5000, and the sniper mode is set to 50% (default), sniper mode puts it at 2500.

This mouse is a little bit on the heavier side though, even with all the weights taken out, it tips the scale over my G9 even with the weights in the G9 and NOT in the R.A.T. 7. But that's easy to get used to, the funkiness of it's design and ability to form fit the palm rest and thumb buttons, as well as change the ring finger and pinky siding to different grips as well as a rest for casual usage is a great feature. Doubt it's as comfortable as some ergonomic mice with dual form fitted finger rests, but remember, this is a changeable design.

Very few cons with this mouse so far, minor annoyances.
- I wished Cyborg would have gone with covering for the metal frame bottom, yes, it's sturdy and easily usable as a flail, but the corners of the metal get on my nerves for fear I may scratch my mousepad, which is FROM Cyborg also, lol. Also the mouse's feet could have a little more surface to them.
- The mouse DPI setting button (located in below the mouse wheel) feels a little loose, which kind of scared me, I'm wondering if it should be stiffer or is that how it's suppose to be? Not too sure, will have to email Cyborg about it, but it works, it's more of a single button switch than a button. Like a toggle button, that you press and push forward to increase, or press and pull back to decrease DPI setting.
- Another minor annoyance is the thumb buttons swivle ability, if you get way too into a game, I could see the potential for pushing too hard on the thumb buttons and sniper button and possible pushing in the thumb buttons so you'd have to readjust the swivle again.
- Last minor annoyance is the tool placement for the mouse. I like how it's part of the mouse so it's not easily lost. BUT damned if you have small hands or like to support your mouse with only your fingers for really fast paced pick up and move shooting, for the nub of the tool does get annoying to the bottom palm of your hand, at least move the palm rest down one click to avoid this problem. I like 2 clicks down myself, gives a better palm feel for me.

Overall, I'm really shocked. Glad Saitek/Cyborg kept up with producing this mouse the way it came out and don't let the MadCatz label fool you. Ever true gamer knows about MadCatz, but remember, this is a CYBORG, not really a MadCatz, though it has their label. Also they do include a nifty tin case to carry all the extra parts and even a small container for weights you aren't using, though the weight container is somewhat a pain since the weights can get stuck inside. I suggest you toss it out or place a buffer inside the bottom so weights won't get stuck. With as big as the tin case is, you'd think the mouse would fit inside also, which I wish it did! Be a great way to transport a mouse for LAN parties.

If you got the dough to dish out, it's a pretty interesting mouse with a great concept, adjust it to your hand for whatever reason or game you play. Again, this mouse is capable of being used as a flail, so remember not to beat anyone who sneaks behind you while you're trying to shoot someone.
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35 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2012
I purchased the mouse back in March. After about 6 months time, the thumb rest broke. I opened a warranty case with cyborg/madcatz about the mouse, and exchanged about a half dozen emails back and fourth with the company. Once we got to the point of the RMA address and number, I never heard back from the company again. I replied, no response. Now in early January, I've opened a new case hoping that would help. Well it's been 2 weeks since the new case, and not a single response.

The mouse was good when it worked. Now it is useless, and I'm back to using my Logitech mouse, which at least still works. It's an expensive mouse to have it as a paper weight.
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi - Sorry to hear your customer service experience wasn't up to your expectations. If you have not yet had your technical support claim resolved, you can contact Josh, my associate in the technical support department, directly: jharford@madcatz.com. I will ensure he handles the case himself to resolve your situation. We appreciate your feedback!
The manufacturer commented on the review below
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on November 17, 2011
This mouse has to be the best looking and most customizable on the market to date. I absolutely fell in love with both the R.A.T. 5 and the R.A.T. 7. I purchased the R.A.T. 5 first about a year ago and had the time of my life with it for about 5-6 months, then out of the blue it stopped moving on the y-axis. About a week after that, the cursor stopped moving all-together. I was devastated, I researched online for weeks to find some way to fix it, all I came up with was that the sensor was crap and that the whole batch had issues. So I bought a Razer Deathadder as a back-up mouse and that still works fine to this day. About 3 months ago i decided i wanted to give the R.A.T. line another go, and i bought the R.A.T. 7. The effect was the same, had a fantastic time with it impressing my friends and loving the thing to death. Then...ah...it hurts to think about, but the same thing happened, only this time it skipped the whole "not working on the y-axis" part straight to the "not working at all" part. I will always be impressed with the design and ingenuity of the mouse and its ability to complete my computing/gaming experience but alas I must put these mice to rest. If it was just that one batch of R.A.T. 5s that were bad and my R.A.T. 7 was in perfect condition I would suggest buying as soon as possible, unfortunately it appears that Mad Catz cannot make a mouse that lasts. I will take both my mice and put them back in their original packaging for a proper burial and as a reminder that the best looking things in life, are generally hiding something that they are severely lacking in. This mouse was great, but i cannot in good conscious recommend a mouse that will break withing a year. Alas Mad Catz, you have lost another customer, and your products will no loner grace my desktop. Au revoir
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi - Thanks a lot for the positive feedback. I'm glad you enjoyed the design aspects of the RAT series! As for your concerns regarding the longevity of the mouse, all of our products are are covered by a warranty that ensures your product meets your expectations and lasts as long as it should.

In case you haven't yet submitted a support ticket (http://support.madcatz.com) or contacted our support hotline (1-800-659-2287), you can email my contact in Technical Support directly. His name is Josh, and his email is jharford@madcatz.com. He will personally ensure your issue is quickly resolved. Thank you!
The manufacturer commented on the review below
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on January 23, 2012
I purchased this item in Sept of 2011, and it stopped working in Dec 2011. I have had an open ticket with mad catz / cyborg with 0 response for 2 weeks. I tried calling customer support, waited on hold, only to be disconnected several times. The live support always show offline. If you like to waste money, by all means, purchase this item. I am sending the item back for a partial refund to amazon, at least they know what good customer support is all about.
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi - I'm sorry to hear you've been having difficulty contacting our technical support department. If you haven't received a reply from our ticketing system yet and still need assistance with this item, please contact my associate in technical support directly. His name is Josh, and he can be reached at jharford@madcatz.com. He will resolve your issue personally. I will let him know to expect an email from you. Thanks for your feedback!
The manufacturer commented on the review below
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on September 25, 2011
I love the Idea of the Rat. But the sensor they chose to put in it simply does not work properly. i was not dependable at all, within a day of plugging it in i had to constantly jiggle it to get it to register sideways movement, picking it up and putting it back down before it would come back to life. this is unacceptable, and i never had to do anything like that with all the logitech mice i have owned over the years..... back to logitech i go.
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The manufacturer commented on this review (What's this?)
Hi Jason - Thanks for your feedback! This isn't a trait shared by all the RATs. Instead, it sounds like you received a unit that is defective. Technical support will be able to help you out with that. They can be reached by phone at 1-800-659-2287 or via our support ticketing system at http://support.madcatz.com.

Since it looks like you've been waiting a while without a mouse, try contacting Josh in support directly. His email is jharford@madcatz.com, and I will see to it that he handles your claim personally. For future reference, you can contact support to to take care of any issues you experience with your products. Have a good day!

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