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Madam Secretary: A Memoir Paperback – Bargain Price


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 736 pages
  • Publisher: Miramax (April 6, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401359620
  • ASIN: B000ETQQ1O
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.2 x 2.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #186,057 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From The New Yorker

This memoir by America's first female Secretary of State is a deeply conventional book, full of long accounts of negotiations and reflections on the proper uses of American power. Albright is not out to settle scores (her criticisms of colleagues are mild at worst) and seems, on balance, pleased with the foreign-policy record of the Clinton Administration. This might have made a dull book, were it not for Albright's appealing character—personally ingenuous but professionally sophisticated, earnest but hard-nosed. Her eye for details—clothing, food, travel conditions—helps bring the diplomat's world to life, and her portraits of foreign leaders are lively and evocative. The result is a book that creates a sense of policy made by real people, not by world-bestriding titans.
Copyright © 2005 The New Yorker

Review

"A different kind of memoir...it's Albright unplugged." -- USA Today

"Madeleine Albright's memoir is unlike that of any other Secretary of State. It captures the tension between insecurity and ambition..." -- New York Times Book Review

"One of the most diverting political bios in recent memory." -- Entertainment Weekly

"Provides a sweeping overview of foreign crises during the entire eight year term of the Clinton presidency..." -- Seattle Times

"The fascinating story of a remarkable person who has served her country well." -- Dallas Morning News

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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For anybody interested in recent history, this is a book to be read!
PST
Her tales of growing in very middle-class, very white bread Denver in the 1950s were laugh-out-loud hilarious.
Jean E. Pouliot
I find this Memoir of Madeleine Albright to be well written, informative and not at all boring.
Audrey L. Rohleder

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By V. L. Wilson on September 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
If you, like me, are curious about America's foreign policy, you will find this 512 page autobiography of the first female secretary of state, good insightful reading. It is written in an easy to read manner, very detailed and inforative, and you will wonder, as I did, how this woman managed to work so many long hours for the White House, flew all over the world to meet and eat with other diplomats, and still maintain her composure. What exactly motivated her? She clearly did have the background for this job, dearly loved the power and prestige, and like her or not, you will enjoy her memoirs. Yes you will!

Strangely, after completing this long memoir which could have been considerably shortened, I discovered her ideas of freedom and democracy are actually not unlike those of Colin Powell and Condoleeza Rice, her successors in the Bush administration. So I wonder why then, does she sound so partisan and take little digs at them on television interviews?

Madeleine Korbel was born in 1937 in Prague. She lived in England, went to school in Switzerland for a time, and arrived with her family in America in 1948. In 1949 the Korbel family moved to Colorado. While attending Wellesley College, she became an American citizen in 1957. In 1959, after graduating, she married Joseph Albright. They had three daughter, including identical twins. She suffered a very painful divorce from Joseph Albright in 1983.

During the marriage she earned a Ph.D from Columbia University. She worked for Senator Edmund Muskie, worked on the staff of the National Security Council among other things, and somehow managed to be wife, mother, hostess, and hone her diplomatic skills while working long hours.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jean E. Pouliot on June 16, 2006
Format: Audio Cassette
The first female American Secretary of State narrates her life story with emphasis on her unexpected rise from refugee from European tyranny to the highest councils of the land.

Albright tells of her early years as the daughter of a Czech diplomat and of her flight from the Nazis and later the communists. Her tales of growing in very middle-class, very white bread Denver in the 1950s were laugh-out-loud hilarious. The picture of the future Secretary of State trying so hard to be liked on Valentine's day was both poignant and ironic. Albright takes us through her years at Wellesley College, to her marriage to newspaper heir-apparent Joe Albright, through the birth of her children and her dreams of becoming a professor like her father. After her unexpected divorce, she found comfort in teaching and involvement in politics, fundraising for Ed Muskie in 1972. Eventually taped as Ambassador to the UN and then Secretary of State by Bill Clinton, she had a privileged position to view (and direct) the policies of the United States and the world.

The book is a wonderful, though not too detailed, history lesson in world politics. Albright lets us in on the inner negotiations around the Camp David accords between Yassar Arafat and Benjamin Netanyahu, to the Wye River accords with Balkan leaders, past the Lewinsky affair and to the Clinton Administration's often frustrating attempts to deal with Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan and Slobodan Milosevic in the former Yugoslavia. Throughout, Albright shows her admiration for and loyalty to Bill Clinton, and an admirable determination to make America the champion of peace and diplomacy throughout the world.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Archer on December 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What a fascinating woman and what a journey she has been on throughout her life. Being an Australian, I was not drawn to purchase this book because of any political bias, I was just interested to learn more about her as a person and what lead her to become Secretary of State. The book is extremely well written and I found it hard to put it down. It never got bogged down in the political side but gave insight into political events and decisions that were very interesting. I would love to meet her in person - she is intelligent, resourceful, dogmatic in her determination to do everything in her power to ensure the well-being of America and its interests yet comes across as humble and I suspect she has a wicked sense of humor. I am full of admiration of what she has achieved in her life and I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to know more about the person behind the position.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cybele_now-L on June 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wonderfully entertaining, wonderfully interesting, wonderful inspiring... Madeline Albright's story and the stories she tells are framed by her strong intellectual curiosity, drive, love of history and learning, principles, and sense of humor. This is one of those books about which one is tempted to say that every young person should read it. And you know what? It's a temptation to which it's only sensible to succumb: Here it is, then: Every young person should read this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sykes on January 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I expected a much more interesting memoir than this book turned out to be. Mrs. Albright seemed to do a lot of stroking the many people she worked with in this book. It felt more like an advertisement for different politicians than an insightful, thought-provoking read. I was very sorry as I admire Madeleine Albright, quite a lot.
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