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Made in America: The Shaping of Modern American Evangelicalism Hardcover – July, 1991


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Pub Group (July 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801043549
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801043543
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #237,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Michael S. Horton

White Horse Inn, President
White Horse Inn Radio Show, Co-Host
Editor-in-Chief, Modern Reformation Magazine
J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California

B.A., Biola University; M.A., Westminster Seminary California; Ph.D., University of Coventry and Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.

Michael Horton is the president of White Horse Inn, a multi-media catalyst for Reformation. He is editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine (www.modernreformation.org) and co-host of the nationally syndicated White Horse Inn radio broadcast (www.whitehorseinn.org). Michael Horton is also the J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California. Before coming to WSC, Michael Horton completed a Research Fellowship at Yale University Divinity School. A member of various societies, including the American Academy of Religion and the Evangelical Theological Society, Michael Horton is the author/editor of twenty books, including a series of studies in Reformed dogmatics published by Westminster John Knox, whose final volume (_People and Place: A Covenant Ecclesiology_) was published in 2008 which won the 2008 Christianity Today Book of the Year award in Theology.

His most recent books are _The Gospel-Driven Life_, _Christless Christianity_ and _People and Place: A Covenant Ecclesiology_. He has written articles for _Modern Reformation_, _Pro Ecclesia_, _Christianity Today_, _The International Journal of Systematic Theology_, _Touchstone_, and _Books and Culture_.

Michael Horton is associate pastor of Christ United Reformed Church in Santee, California, and lives in Escondido, with his wife, Lisa, and four children.

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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 24, 1997
Format: Paperback
Made In America details how American Evengelicalism is more a propduct of the American Entrprenuerial spirit than Evengelical. It details clearly the shift that took place between the God-centered focus of the 1st Great Awakening to the man-centered focus of the 2nd Great Awakening.

The first awakening involved a focus on correct teaching. God was seen as the active party in Salvation creating faith in the hearts of belivers through the means of the preached Word. Worship, doctrine and life were all based upon the clear, consistent teaching of Christ as redeemer, living a life in obedience to God's requirements in the place of the sinner, and His sacrificial death in the place of the sinner. Christ was the active party bringing one to faith (throught the means of preaching Christ) and keeping them saved (through the same means.)
The 1st awakening was a continuation of the Reformation that started in the 17th century.

The theology shifted drastically between the two awakenings. In reaction to the enlightenment, the ideas of a soveregn 'God who saves and sustains sinners' did not play well in the American Frontier. Rugged American individualism demanded a theological system with a much more optimistic view of mankind. Augustianian beliefs in mankind's total deprvity and inability to please God did not fit well with a lifestyle of people who had fought for independence and conquered a frontier. John Wesley had been preaching (in England) about mankind's ability to turn to God of his own volition, and this mixed much better with the optimistic view so common in America. This lead to the 2nd Awakening in which mankind was to turn to God on his own. The content of preaching shifted from Christ and Him crucified to Man needing to make himself Holy before God.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By D.P. on October 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was written in 1991, so there are some new things that Evangelicalism has flirted with since this book was written, but the primary thesis of the book still rings true: that Evangelicalism has compromised its message for "another gospel which is not another gospel".

Horton shows that the gospel of the Puritans is not the gospel of the modern day descendants of the Puritans. Christians have sold into the Philosophies which are anti-Christian in their origin and seek to "entertain" the lost with them. Horton does a good job to show that this came from the Second Great Awakening and not the first, because the first Great Awakening was centered on God and His glory, and not on what God can do for man.

The American church has followed the autonomous American dream more than the communal nature of the church and Horton does a wonderful job of showing this. Unfortunately the themes in this book are just as true as they were when this book was written. Evangelical churches are just as pragmatic and separatistic as when this book was written.

This was one of the first books to critique the Evangelical compromise and as such needs to be read. It is out of date in a few areas (i.e. Open Theism's flirtation with Process Theology, among other things), but Horton hits the nail on the head.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By anton dubrov on February 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
As a reformed atheist,I thoroughly appreciate the writings of Michael Horton. However, be prepared for some folks gittin' all bent outta shape as Horton gores the sacred cows of the HWP (health, wealth, prosperity)mindset. The author shows clearly the historical gradual downward slide from accepting a sovereign God to a man centered belief pretty much based on Arminian thought. Indeed the tragedy of the fall has cast long shadows reaching across the pages of history to work confusion in the minds of well meaning believers today.

In some ways I find a degree of sadness in all this, with so many folks missing the mark. Horton keeps on track throughout the book and stays away from prejorative terms which are so often employed by the people that are so blind that they choose not to see. "Made in America" is an appropriate title. It certainly could not be titled "Made in Heaven" with its egocentric world view that has been handed down from the Greek error that "Man is the measure of all things."

This book is about a hot topic guaranteed to divide the sheep from the goats and bring out the best and worst in its readers. It certainly doesn't make the writer into any kind of a hero. There is a logical progression of ideas throughout the book and like it or not, Michael Horton has nailed it in a courteous manner that is maintained all through the book. Perhaps other readers will sense his genuine concern for those sincere and well meaning folks who are taken in by this insidious deception that plays upon our deepest fears of poverty and sickness.

Soli Gloria Deo
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Seboni on January 19, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd love to give it a 5 star given it's straight talk tone on issues affecting Christianity. The book is however not conclusive on what needs to be done to remedy the situation, probably a topic covered in another book by Horton.
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0 of 22 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Hara on November 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
While this book does a nice service in showing how all rebellion against legitimate authority always winds up (in this case, the rebellion of the protestors against Christ's one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church), it is so full of typical Calvinist balderdash that I almost don't know where to start.

Let me begin by saying that I am an X PCA Calvinist who, by God's grace, was led to find the Faith which was once delivered to the Apostles -- and it ain't Calvinism. Therefore, having been in the PCA for 13 years and having drunk deeply of it's theologial errors and misinterpretations of the Scriptures, I think I have a right to address this poor piece of writing. While it may be a good overview of American history, as theology it is a piece of tommyrot.

On Page 12, Horton quotes Donald Bloesch: "...but faithfulness to the apostolic Faith, rediscovered and attested anew in the Reformation, is dismally lacking."

No, sir. What is lacking is any sort of understanding of what constitutes the apostolic Faith. Like so many other converts who have swum the Tiber to the Catholic Church, I was SHOCKED to read the Early Fathers of the Church and find that they understood that Christ's very Body and Blood are truly present in the Eucharist. The redefining of this precious Sacrament was not a "rediscovering" and "reattesting" of the apostolic Faith -- it was APOSTASY!!! That becomes very clear to anyone who actually reads the Early Fathers. Unfortunately for most who desire the Truth, the writings of the Early Fathers are not made clearly present in "reformed churches" lest the sheep begin to ask too many questions.
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