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Showing 1-10 of 28 reviews(3 star)show all reviews
on July 11, 2015
Really good book. I read Switch first so some of the examples felt similar
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on June 2, 2015
Good for marketing professionals, not sure about other fields. There is a formula and summary that it comes down to. Might as well just read the summarized version.
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on May 8, 2015
In their book, Made to Stick, Chip and Dan Heath take a look at what makes some ideas “stick” and others to flop. The Heath brothers set out to analyze what traits certain ideas have that cause them to be remembered for a lifetime and repeated throughout history. The authors are interested in determining how effective ideas are constructed. Nurturing messages in a way that makes them memorable is vital for the advertising of a company and ensuring that their desired brand image is what gets relayed to the public. Also, “sticky” ideas are important to us as individuals as our beliefs are formed from ideas that have stayed with us and withstood the test of time.
The authors determined the following six principles that “sticky” ideas share: 1) Simplicity 2) Unexpectedness 3) Concreteness 4) Credibility 5) Emotions 6) Stories. They summarize this checklist into the acronym SUCCESs: a Simple Unexpected Concrete Credentialed Emotional Story. The core of this book can be boiled down to 2 steps that will make ideas “sticky”: First, is to find the core of the idea, second, is to translate the core using the SUCCESs checklist. The authors illustrate these principles through real-life examples of successful “sticky” ideas such as Southwest Airlines as THE low-fare airline, Jane Elliots’ brown eyes, blue eyes experiment on her third-graders, and Hoover Adams’ emphasis on having “names, names, names” in his local newspaper. These cases provide evidence for the effectiveness of each of the principles by showing how they have worked in real world scenarios.
The authors spend a chapter talking about each of the six principles and how we can incorporate them when creating ideas and communicating messages. One of the most important traits of an effective message is that it must be simple and must get right down to the core of the idea. The authors illustrate the importance of creating surprise and interest in viewers, which can be done through creating a mystery that form “knowledge gaps” in viewers. The authors recognize that some of the principles are common sense such as keeping your message simple, appealing to emotions, and providing a narrative. With this being the case, many ideas fail nonetheless often due to the “Curse of Knowledge”. The authors say this phenomenon occurs when experts forget that most people do not understand their advanced knowledge, which causes experts to formulate complex, abstract ideas that appeal to logic but do not resonate with the masses because they cannot be understood and have no emotional appeal. The authors layout various methods to avoid this mistake and create ideas that will appeal to the masses.
I thought the authors did an effective job in achieving their objectives and provided good amount of detail on what each of the principles consists of. I thought the examples provided were helpful but I feel some chapters had too many of them and it became a repetition of the same idea. Also, being aware of many examples the authors used such as Jared from subway, hearing them again was a bit pointless. It became hard to follow how some of the examples related back to the principles they were describing at times. The thought the authors did a good job of starting out and closing chapters with the main points they were trying to get across which helped keep my attention. I found the facts provided from the authors to be more useful than the examples.
This book provides valuable insight for all of us in our daily lives when we need to convince someone to follow our idea. It especially valuable to those with jobs involving sales and marketing as this book shows readers how to come up with a slogan or advertising campaign that is relevant to the product or service and one that people will remember. The authors seeks to help readers by providing a communication framework for ideas. Examples include if you want the audience to pay attention, make the message unexpected, if you want to agree with you, make sure the message is credible, and if you want people to care, make the message emotional. The book also contains a “sticky advice” section that has helpful tips on how we can incorporate the six principles into our lives and a section on advising teachers on how to make their lesson plans “stick” with students. Overall, this book provides a solid blueprint on how to make sure our ideas are remembered.
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Overly long....yes...too many stories...yes....still worth a read ...YES !

A good book about why some ideas catch on and flourish while others never gain traction or quickly die. The book is based on 6 characteristics of what the authors call "sticky" ideas. They are:
1. Simple
2. Concrete
3. Unexpected
4. Emotional
5. Story
6. Credible

I found many of the stories to be informative and did a great job of driving home the authors points. I particularly liked the stories about the "TRUTH" ad campaigns which helped lower smoking among teens and the very successful subway campaign they did with Jared a few years back.

As I mentioned before I feel the book was overly long but still worth a read and note taking. I recommend this book for anyone that has ideas to communicate: Pastors, teachers, parents, managers, leaders, authors, speakers etc.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 12, 2014
Ugh. Nothing really new here.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2014
I know this book is a classic, and it came highly recommended, but I just didn't find it very engaging…I never made it to the end.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 28, 2014
this was a gift soooooo I can not grade it
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2014
Lesson of the whole book is that attention grabbers sell. He gives some okay examples, decent read but nothing special.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 18, 2013
This "how to" book would be very helpful to politicians, ministers and teachers!
It is well-written and well organized. Personally, it was not as useful to me as a retired person.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 17, 2013
I HAVEN'T HAD ANY COMPLAINTS ON THE ITEMS THAT i HAVE ORDERED FOR WORK. THE BOOKS ARE USED FOR TRAINING TOOLS
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