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Madscam Paperback – November 6, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Entrepreneur Press; 1 edition (November 6, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1599180421
  • ISBN-13: 978-1599180427
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,715,272 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After 30 years of agency experience with Madison Avenue firms like Ogilvy and Mather and Young and Rubicam, Parker, who is known for his advertising blogs "AdScam.com" and "AdHurl.com," offers this friendly, informative guide to advertising for small businesses. After outlining how to focus your advertising on your business's strengths, find your unique selling point and budget appropriately, Parker devotes a chapter each to print, television and new media ad strategies. In the final sections, he discusses how to hire freelancers and agencies, and how to track results. Resources and a glossary round out the book. Beginners will find more useful ideas than an established small business person, though his insider tips (e.g., a list of "Dumb Things You Should Avoid" when advertising, such as "trying to associate yourself with things that have no relevance to what you do") can be very insightful. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

McGraw-Hill authors represent the leading experts in their fields and are dedicated to improving the lives, careers, and interests of readers worldwide

More About the Author

George Parker has spent more than thirty five years in the Madison Avenue salt mines with such major agencies as Ogilvy & Mather, Young & Rubicam, Chiat Day. J. Walter Thompson and many others. He's worked in New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Stockholm and anywhere else were they would pay him obscene amounts of money and give him an AmEx platinum card with no questions asked. In the course of his career he's won Cannes Lions, CLIOs, EFFIES, the David Ogilvy Award and several hundred other bits of tin and plastic His blog AdScam.Typepad.com, which was named as one of the four best ad blogs in the world by Campaign Magazine, is required reading for those looking for a piss & vinegar view of the world's second oldest profession.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
As an advertising veteran and a small business owner I have an unique perspective of this book.
212swat
It's as much fun getting to know George Parker as it is learning about advertising, and you'll be wealthier and happier for both.
A Reader in Washington DC
It's well written with a good dose of sarcasm and cycnism, and some very funny anecdotes he's picked up along the way.
Marino A. Gallo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By 212swat on November 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
As an advertising veteran and a small business owner I have an unique perspective of this book. For someone in advertising this book is a great refresher course. It seems to me that a lot of current advertising has forgotten about the basics and would be served well to go back and relearn the lessons that are covered in MadScam. As a small business owner this book forces you to think hard and focus on what your USP (unique selling proposition) is. How do I differentiate myself from my competitors? And once I do, how do I implement my strategy? MadScam is the "Art of War" for entrepeneurs' marketing/advertising campaigns.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Reader in Washington DC on November 15, 2006
Format: Paperback
I learned more about advertising laughing my way through George Parker's "MadScam" than I learned about England earning an entire Ph.D.! On his blogs, Parker can be rude, boistrous, outspoken, and downright sexist, but those are primarily the qualities by which I treasure his opinions. In this book he sobers up and presents the world of advertising for the small or medium-sized business owner who thinks it might be time to hire an agency. He psychoanalyzes the typical advertising executive's deepest motivations and the average business owner's needs and worries with a level of honesty that will save you -- his devoted reader -- an absolute fortune.

According to evidence on his Adscam blog, Parker's best stories have not yet been printed in a book, and in fact should probably never be printed anywhere. But if this book is the success it deserves to be, the public surely will drag those stories out of him. Meanwhile, I admire the Entrepreneur Press for having the vision to offer an industry veteran's clear-eyed observations to the world. It's as much fun getting to know George Parker as it is learning about advertising, and you'll be wealthier and happier for both.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bernie L. Malonson on April 11, 2008
Format: Paperback
If you are a marketer, or responsible for the sales and or service of a product, then you know that if you don't make sales, you don't make money. It is amazing how many advertisers and marketers forget that fact.

George Parker gets it. The ironic part is that he has far more in common with direct marketers than with the Madison Avenue types that he typically consorts with.

There is a large focus on really understanding the Unique Selling Point of your product. This is often glossed over in Business Schools, but it really is key. If you can't say what makes your product or service different than the competition then how can you expect your clients to get it?

12 well thought out chapters covering print, television, radio, Internet and much, much more.

Although not the final word, a solid read and well though out perspective.

Recommended!

Cheers!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Cartoonist on November 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
At last - a useful book about advertising. From a client's point of view. George Parker exposes the big dumb agencies as what they are, which is big and dumb, and how a client can get better advertising with good freelancers or a small team. But then, it's also a good book for creatives too: read & learn! Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
OVERVIEW OF BOOK
-----------------
"MadScam" is a guide for small and medium sized businesses who need cost effective advertising. The book is well organized, with informative (if somewhat wordy) chapter and subchapter titles.

REVIEWERS BACKGROUND AND PERSPECTIVE
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I am starting a new business, and read "MadScam" for pointers on how to handle the launch. "MadScam" contains a lot very practical ideas. On the down side, the book is cluttered with contradictions, unsubstantiated opinions, and a half dozen diatribes about the decadence and corruption of Madison Avenue (if you like that sort of thing, this is definitely the book for you). An example of unsubstantiated opinions is the author rejection of the use of telemarketing (pg. 31), newspaper inserts (pg. 86), and billboards (pg. 89). The only reason offered is that the authors finds them distasteful.

"MADSCAM" IN COMPARISON TO OTHER TITLES
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There is an entire library shelf devoted to insider guides to the world of advertising, including: "Confessions of an Advertising Man", "Where Suckers Moon", "Hey Whipple, Squeeze This", etc. All of these books, including "MadScam", are self-promotion for advertising businesspeople masquerading as exposes/memoirs. I rate "MadScam" the best of the pack in terms of usefulness, organization, and focus. It is near the back of the pack in terms of literary merit. I find it tiresome being regaled with how deep and informative European advertising is when compared to the dumbed down American versions (pg. 132, etc.) Did I mention the author is a native of Great Britain?
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Duj on January 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
George Parker nails it, breaking down the advertising process step-by-step in a practical, nuts and bolts fashion while simultaneously mocking the mentality of many "BDA's" as he calls them (Big Dumb Agencies). His criticism of agencies adding layer upon layer of abstraction to justify their billings, their obsession with awards, and in his view overall lack of spine is classic for anybody involved in advertising. He does a great job of simplifying things and providing a manual of sorts for entrepreneurs. There were points in this book I laughed out loud and others where I nodded and thought, "Well put George." Check his blog if you want a more bombastic delivery of some of these ideas (if profanity offends you, go read some industry drivel instead).
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