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Mafioso (English Subtitled) 1962 NR

Available on Prime
4.5 out of 5 stars (34) IMDb 7.7/10

Spending his holidays with his wife and two daughters in his native village in Sicily, Antonio Badalamenti is kidnapped by gangsters, locked up in a case and flown to the States.

Starring:
Alberto Sordi, Norma Bengell
Runtime:
1 hour, 42 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Alberto Lattuada
Starring Alberto Sordi, Norma Bengell
Supporting actors Gabriella Conti, Ugo Attanasio, Cinzia Bruno, Katiuscia, Armando Tine, Lilly Bistrattin, Michèle Bailly, Francesco Lo Briglio, Carmelo Oliviero, Stefano Benigno, Paolo Cuccia, Hugh Hurd, Vincenzo Norvese, Giuseppe Stagnitti, John Topa, Saverio Turiello
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Stanley H. Nemeth on April 13, 2008
Format: DVD
This movie is a brilliant, consistently ironic and finally grim comedy, and as such far sadder than tragedy. Rather than showing us an imperfect man attempting to rise to the occasion when it's sadly too late, this film shows him instead too easily falling to it.

A northern Italian auto factory foreman, the marvelous Alberto Sordi first appears standing before rows of wonderfully photographed clanging machines, performing dully repetitive tasks. Eagerly, he demands his workers obey his directions for a robot like speed of their own - i.e. man as boss dehumanizing man as underling. Soon taking a vacation to the South, Sicily, to introduce his family to his "roots," the Sordi character is asked by his own northern boss to deliver an objet d'art to the Mafia leader down there. This delegated task creates a meaningful link between the seemingly opposite "economically booming" North and the impoverished South, one which the film never loses sight of. Weak humanity is easily corruptible into the pawns of superiors, North or South. In the movement of the film, we are taken then not so much from an urbane, civilized North to a rural, primitive South as a much shorter distance - out of the frying pan and into the fire.

The director of this film, Alberto Lattuada, stated that he habitually looked through the lens of the camera and was essentially the author of every shot. One can easily believe him.
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Format: DVD
Italian actor Alberto Sordi stars in this brilliant, mordant comedy about a jovial Sicilian engineer who returns to his hometown (with his new family in tow) and exults in the simple country pleasures of rural Sicily. Meanwhile, Nino's blonde, glamorous Northern Italian wife is utterly horrified: her husband's hometown is seen as a parade of the broadest ethnic stereotypes, all the disparaging images that Northerners hold against Southern Italians: that they are swarthy, crude, loutish, loud, hot-tempered, and completely mired in the criminal culture of the Mafia.

For the first half of the film, Nino appears an utter innocent, happily embracing all his childhood kith and kin, speaking glowingly of charity of the local Mafia Don, cheerfully accepting all the absurd explanations of why half the town seems to be either dead or in jail. But slowly, the truth of Nino's past emerges, and we realize that this dumb country cluck is a little more savvy that he lets on... About the same time, the film does an equal about-face, shifting from a broad farce into a chilling Mob movie. It's a fascinating film; also a nice glimpse into Italy in the early 1960s, a forward-looking, industrialized nation with deep ties to its old past. Definitely worth checking out. (Joe Sixpack, Slipcue film reviews)
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Mafioso is a prime example of the commedia all'italiana as a complex film blurring the lines between comedy and drama. For the most part, it is entertaining though the climax is rather slow and brings the film to a sputtering end rather than a truly satisfying conclusion.

It is the story of Nino Badalamenti, a Sicilian technician working and living in northern Italy with his family. He is a man fully in control of himself and his surroundings, dictating everything from his colleagues to his own family, calling the shots for their family vacation to his native Italy.

This is where the movie finds its strengths; as someone of Sicilian ancestry, I can appreciate the stereotypes and differences between Sicilian and northern Italians, and Mafioso plays these up to very funny effect. The Sicilians are coarse, hairy, loud, and over-the-top foils to the suave and sophisticated northerners. (I find this even funnier as it is from an Italian perspective; most non-Italian films view all Italians as the same, and it's great to find a movie that actually recognizes that there is diversity within this country.)

The comic-tragic elements come from the main narrative though, of Nino's struggles with his own identity as a Sicilian (and of course the inevitable mafia-stereotype that comes along with that) and getting back into the circles of crime he was involved with as a youth. This pulls him back into committing a terrible crime, which the end of the film implies will affect him to the rest of his days.

Mafioso is certainly a good movie, entertaining and thought-provoking; the sequence surrounding Nino's crime, though, is told too slowly in my opinion and doesn't contribute much to the greater conflict of identity politics, which is conveyed much more strongly for the rest of the film.
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Format: DVD
i finally got to see this film recently and enjoyed it from start to finish. the Humor at first was a trip and then the film got real dark and serious.the Main character was coming back home and he wanted to still be down with his roots and he was being tested. his wife represented the new world he had undertaken and his family and old running buddies didn't know if he had changed or if he was still down. he was working a auto plant and they wanted to see if the big city life had changed him from his past ways. this film was the one that got the Godfather and other classics off and running. Giada De laurentis of the Food Channel who has a show called Everyday Italian,well her Grandfather Dino De Laurentis Produced this film.this is a must see film.
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