Maggie Cassidy (Annotated) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$10.71
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $4.29 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Maggie Cassidy Paperback – August 1, 1993


See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.71
$5.76 $0.01
Unknown Binding, Import
"Please retry"


Frequently Bought Together

Maggie Cassidy + Visions of Cody
Price for both: $23.87

Buy the selected items together
  • Visions of Cody $13.16

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (August 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140179062
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140179064
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #308,959 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jack Kerouac(1922-1969), the central figure of the Beat Generation, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922 and died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969. Among his many novels are On the Road, The Dharma Bums, Big Sur, and Visions of Cody.

More About the Author

Jack Kerouac (1922-1969), the central figure of the Beat Generation, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922 and died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969. Among his many novels are On the Road, The Dharma Bums, Big Sur, and Visions of Cody.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

It tells the tale of the loss of first love.
B. M. White
Out of all the Kerouac books I've read, I don't think one has ever made me feel so much, in this case it really took me back to my own adolescence.
scorley@runet.edu
It is sad and powerful in the descriptions and the visual images that he gives that give insight to Kerouac more as a person rather than a writer.
William Bradford

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Birdman on March 12, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When Kerouac was good he was superb. This is young love in a glorious, mind-bending nutshell. Beautifully written and deeply felt.
When I was much younger and had experienced my first brutal betrayal in life, this novel was my greatest comfort. Kerouac had uncanny vision into the human heart, and was capable of expressing the awful paradox of young love, the joy and pain of it, it terms that were never sentimental, and often quietly heroic.
A poetic, lovely book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you are a fan of Kerouac then this is a must. It is more lyrical and poetic than ON THE ROAD, yet not as difficult to read as Lonesome Traveller. I enjoyed the first person narrative and was keen to see the switch to third person in the closing chapter as J.D. leaves adolescence behind. Kerouac artfully captures the feelings that accompany a burgeoning love affair even if the characters are only 17. I would highly recommend!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By NotATameLion on June 15, 2001
Format: Paperback
"There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves punishment, and the one who fears is not perfected in love." (1 John 4:18)
Life is not sanitized and easy. Kerouac knew this from hard-bitten experience. The amazing thing about Jack was that when it was over, he could always sing about it in his books. he does so here in "Maggie Cassidy."
I have felt the kind of stuff Jack talks about in this book. The illusion of teen "love" is one of the most wretched feelings in all the world...its elation is too high...too painful. Its ending is wrenching of the soul...usually quickly followed by the joy of illusory freedom. Still, it sticks your head for years after like an annoying song that won't go away--Keroauc gets all this down in one hundred and ninety-four pages...amazing.
Get this book. I recommend it highly to all who've been stung by what they thought was love when they were young.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By scorley@runet.edu on August 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Whenever people talk of Kerouac, they're going to start talking about On the Road, The Dharma Bums or The Subterreaneans. You can't blame them, after all they are the best known of Kerouac's works, and they're all fine novels. Yet too often Kerouac's lesser works go unnoticed, such as Desolation Angels, Dr. Sax...and Maggie Cassidy. Out of all the Kerouac books I've read, I don't think one has ever made me feel so much, in this case it really took me back to my own adolescence. Much like Kerouac (here called Jack Dulouz) I had my own circle of friends in high school that I ran with on a regular basis and I saw many mirror images of them in Jack's group. And much like Dulouz, I hardly ever see them nowadays. And of course, I had my own Maggie Cassidy. It's amazing the similarity of how much Jack and Maggie's relationship ended and how mine and my girlfriend's ended. It was just a gradual end, we both lost interest in each other and our relationship end in spirit long before we ended it officially. We had both met other people and I had come to the realization that I was too young to be tied down to one person, which I think Dulouz realizes in the end also.
And then there are the descriptions that Kerouac gives. It's often been said that his books are poetry and that is most certainly true in this case. The way he describes the snowy New England nights is absolutely beautiful and the way he portrays Maggie you can tell he genuinely felt for her. There are always nuggets of wisdom to be found in Kerouac's book, some insight that he sticks in the middle of his prose/poetry, and there is one in here. He is watching the clock in his living room and what he says is amazing; I won't spoil it for you, you'll just have to read it yourself.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. M. White on April 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
Kerouac had a real talent for capturing the dream of life in words. When I read his books the memories and images are almost palatable. He has the hypnotic effect that all writers dream about and aim for. The fact that he had to draw on his own life for inspiration is both his strength and his failing. Rather, it was a failing that he was able to turn into a strength. Early in his career Kerouac attempted to write normal fiction. His first book The Town & the City is an unfocused mess that lies somewhere between a novel and a memoir. By the time On the Road came scrolling out of his typewriter, Kerouac had figured out his method. Thereafter, he would write his memoirs but he would use a novelist's approach. Freeing himself from the task of inventing stories (which he never quite learned to do properly) he was able to concentrate on capturing the dramas and textures of his own life. Some of the books he subsequently produced by this method were merely self-indulgent meditations on memories that only Kerouac himself could have possibly have been interested in, but other books tell stories that have a more universal appeal and a touching drama at the heart of them. Maggie Cassidy is such a book. It tells the tale of the loss of first love. It takes an unconvential approach as love stories go. Kerouac includes all sorts of scenes and details that seem almost beside the point, and bare little connection to the main plot; the friends playing hookey, his eating crackers in the empty house, the blizzarding birthday party, the track meet. In the end, the book is less the story of a love affair, as it is a meditation on the time in his life when he was in love. It captures that sense of magic that being in love gives to everything around you.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?