Customer Reviews


28 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (13)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different kind of read
In the Motherland being different is frowned upon. If your different, there is probably a reason and that reason is your no good. Standish is different and until he got a friend he was nearly alone in the world. Standish had his grandfather (his parents were taken) and now he had Hector. They play with a football Standish found and it ends up on the other side of a big...
Published 20 months ago by Brittany Moore

versus
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Odd Book. Don't Really Know What to Think!
3.5 Stars

Sometimes a story has more layers than an onion, with more and more meaning to peel away and peel away. Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner is just such a story. But you might not like what you find under each layer.

Standish Treadwell isn't bright. At least, it is safer for Standish if you think that. In the alternative Britain he lives in, there...
Published 17 months ago by OpheliasOwn


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Odd Book. Don't Really Know What to Think!, September 6, 2013
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) (Hardcover)
3.5 Stars

Sometimes a story has more layers than an onion, with more and more meaning to peel away and peel away. Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner is just such a story. But you might not like what you find under each layer.

Standish Treadwell isn't bright. At least, it is safer for Standish if you think that. In the alternative Britain he lives in, there isn't much of anything that could be considered "bright". No color, no fun, no happiness. But for a boy who can't read and write, this cruel world is particularly cruel. That is, until Hector comes along. As the only boy Standish has every called a friend, Hector is the most important person in his life besides Standish's grandfather.

The world doesn't take kindly to friends. With the Greenflies buzzing around and teachers who are willing to beat a little boy to death for laughing, the world is a cold hard place. But when Hector disappears, Standish refuses to stand by and let it happen. He watched his own parents disappear after his mother was taken and returned disfigured, and he isn't going to let the same thing happen to Hector. Standish is the only one who can help. He is the only one who can help because he is the one who is underestimated the most.

Have you read Animal Farm? If you have, you know there are two (or more) layers to that story. You have the weird story about the talking animals taking over the farm, and then you have the deeper allegory into the world's political figures. Maggot Moon is the same kind of story. Honestly? This is NOT a book for young kids or even most young adults. It is deep, complex, violent, bizarre, confusing, and I am not even sure I really liked it, but it had my mind spinning all day. The author is severely dyslexic and she speaks of her learning disability quite candidly. Not only did she make a world with a dyslexic hero, but she also created this dyslexic world inside a dystopia. If you let yourself run with the way the book is written, it feels different, confusing at times. I love the statement this makes about the dyslexic mind... layers and layers of meaning hidden behind simplistic language and a confusing story.

That being said, I actually didn't enjoy this book in the way I enjoy other stories. It was difficult and painful at times, but you shouldn't let that to scare you away. It is the kind of book that will make your head spin if you let it, but you can't fight the odd story and characters. Like Animal Farm there is something deeper here that you have to find yourself. What does this story mean to you? Are you a Standish Treadwell? Is your brother or sister? Student?

The dystopia angle of this story is very odd and won't appeal to many kids who likes the popular dystopias out there (Hunger Games, Maze Runner, etc.). It really shouldn't be classified as a dystopia, and in fact, I think this book defies most categories. But it's strange and interesting, and I still can't stop thinking about it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different kind of read, June 26, 2013
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) (Hardcover)
In the Motherland being different is frowned upon. If your different, there is probably a reason and that reason is your no good. Standish is different and until he got a friend he was nearly alone in the world. Standish had his grandfather (his parents were taken) and now he had Hector. They play with a football Standish found and it ends up on the other side of a big government wall. That's when the trouble really starts. What if Standish hadn't found that football? What if it hadn't gone over the wall? What if that fool Hector didn't volunteer to go get it? Maybe then Hector wouldn't be gone too. Maybe Standish wouldn't have to save him and the rest of the Motherland people.

I don't know what I was expecting with this novel, but it wasn't this. This was very interesting. It was a completely unique tale about a young boy in a cruel world. This story will shock you and warm your heart.

Standish puts himself down a lot. He has dyslexia, and everyone tells him that means he's not very bright. I don't think this is the case at all. Standish is kind and thoughtful. Just because his reading and writing isn't the best, doesn't mean he can't form intelligent thoughts. It's a shame that most of his teachers only perpetuate the idea that he isn't bright instead of trying to help him in any way. This country, the Motherland, seems like a terrible place to be. It seems a bit like Nazi Germany and we all know how fun that was.

The violence in this novel is enough to make you sick. There's the school yard bullying which is bad enough, but then there's the teacher bullying (not to mention the government bullying). Standish's current teacher is the worst. He is a despicable person with no sense of decency, with his sick thoughts based only on self-preservation. It's disgusting that someone as awful as he be granted a position of power over these poor children.

The story wasn't all terrible things happening though. There were many shining moments where your heart can start to warm. It was a very curious story too. I was never quite sure where it was going until we got there. Standish was creative narrator, so the story flowed a bit differently with him telling it then it would if someone else were to.

If you're looking for a novel that's a bit off the beaten track, that pushes your comfort zone; check out Maggot Moon. It was fascinating and totally worth the read.

First Line:
"I'm wondering what if."

Favorite Lines"
"Even if I could, I couldn't"

"Frick-fracking hell!"

"I still have that scream in me."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prolific, February 28, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) (Hardcover)
There isn't much to say about this book that you can't figure out by yourself by reading a small sample, by reading the descriptions, by looking at the beautiful artwork on the cover of the book. All you really need to know is the book is brilliant, broke my heart, sewed it back together, and broke it again. I couldn't stop reading it, and I have clearly found not only a new favorite book, but a new favorite book I will be reading time and time again.

Read it. You won't regret it.

EDIT:

I also wanted to mention the age appropriateness of this book. As the UK version actually does have a warning on the back for violence and language, but the US one does not, I think it's important to know that this book is probably not meant for 12 and under's.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Though in some ways simply written, I found Maggot Moon to be a very powerful book., March 25, 2014
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Kindle Edition)
Though in some ways simply written, I found Maggot Moon to be a very powerful book. Although its syntax and diction was basic enough for middle schoolers, its language and imagery was coarse and crude, reflecting the lives the characters lived. This originally turned me off the story, yet as I continued reading, I found that the excellent character development and themes of courage and rebellion in the story overpowered any negative effect the grammar had originally had on me. The themes and ideas presented in the story, though dark and sometimes depressing, were truly adult, and I can say that the story made me cry in the end. I would recommend it to any high school reader who would like a quick yet thematically and emotionally powerful read.

Student Reviewer: rmaehill
Age at time of review - 16
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Scary Read, April 4, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) (Hardcover)
This dark tale of a totalitarian future society is not for the credulous reader or a those who have no background in dystopian literature. Under the guidance of a skilled/leader or teacher, "Maggot Moon" can be a most worthwhile read for junior high and high school students. But don't give this to a young reader who thinks of other worlds in a Star Wars world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This remarkable book touches your soul with its thought-provoking poignancy!, December 13, 2012
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Hardcover)
This remarkable book touches your soul with its thought-provoking poignancy, by accentuating the subtle nuance of consequential change in a young boy...

Touching your inner core this beautiful story is something truly inspired, totally captivating and a stirring read. Sally Gardner's original work is an outstanding addition to the Young Adult genre, and which had me glued to the page for hours reading in a feverish frenzy. Once you begin to read the words instantly pull you in; reminiscent of bait being lured into a tantalizing trap, partly due to the character-driven narrative. Hector and Standish are two cleverly crafted characters whom you instantly connect with and whose individualistic, singular traits gave the story such vibrancy and energy. Caught in a tangled web of interconnecting threads and shocking twists and turns within the plot, your mind will still be lost within the pages long after finishing reading this book.

Avid readers of this genre will be touched by Hector's story within this intriguing world, where the true meaning of friendship, loyalty and trust between people is tested to the limits as strange happenings take place.

*I would like to take this opportunity of thanking `New Books Magazine' for sending me a copy of Maggot Moon to review for them.*

[...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Finished in One Sitting, January 17, 2015
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Kindle Edition)
We started reading this on a writing class and I ended up sitting in the room for two hours to finish it afterwards. It has short chapters that flow seamlessly together even when they are completely unrelated. The relationships between the characters were equally effortless, and didn't feel forced into it for the sake of familial or romantic bonds. I especially love the interaction of Hector and Standish, which is a large part of Standish's motivation in the book.
The setting is equally lovely, a dystopia which is at once a fantasy land and an eery mirror into real life. The writing amplifies this, with breath-taking phrases and effortless use of made up slang. Would recommend reading, though not on a day or week in which you wish to be happy again. The Kindle version lacks the sequential illustrations of the printed version, which are spectacular but not for the faint of heart. Kind of like the children's series Animorphs, but with more death.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars In a genre of it's own, February 8, 2014
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) (Hardcover)
I have heard other people who read this book referring to it as a book they don't know how to categorize. I, too, felt that way when I was finished. Not really dystopian, historical fiction, general fiction, or fantasy...this book has a mixture of just about everything. Maybe that was what made it so enthralling and difficult to put down. The fact that the novel was kind of based on a conspiracy around the first moon landing was gripping and might even interest adults.

Throughout the book there are illustrations of rats and flies, which gives the reader more of an idea of what the characters are feeling and living with in this society where government rules all. The characters feel trapped and like death may be their only option. This book is an excellent one that I think every young adult should be sure to read. If the cover doesn't convince you, the first few chapters will.

[...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Maggot Moon (YA), December 14, 2014
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Paperback)
Book #118 Read in 2014
Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner (YA)

This book is a young adult dystopian book. It is a "what if" in regards to putting man on the moon...detailing what could have happened in that ended differently. Standish is a 15 year old who can barely read or write, but he is intelligent (he has a great vocabulary), brave and resourceful....all traits that come in handy in this "Big Brother" like world. Standish lives with his grandfather; his parents disappeared after his mother was physically abused for speaking out against the government.

I read this book in one sitting. The chapters are short and interesting; this book would be ideal for a reluctant reader, especially males. It flows well and has a lot of action throughout the book. I recommend it.

http://melissasbookpicks.blogspot.com
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Clever, funny and heartbreaking, October 1, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Maggot Moon (Kindle Edition)
Maggot Moon is deliciously layered and the protagonist Standish Treadwell is as endearing as they come. He’s a fifteen-year-old boy, but he can’t read or write because he’s dyslexic. But who needs reading and writing when you can be as affectionate and intelligent as Standish? When you can see what everyone else can’t and feel what others dare not? When you have Gramps and Hector in your life? And then Hector gets taken away and what’s on the other side of the wall takes on ominious proportions. The book is set in a dsytopian England called the Motherland, very remiscent of Nazi Germany. And the way the Motherland are going to prove themselves to the world is by putting a human on the moon. This is a powerful novel. Keep a tissue handy if you’re going to read it. Did I just say "if"? No, no, you MUST read it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s))
Maggot Moon (Michael L. Printz Award - Honor Title(s)) by Sally Gardner (Hardcover - February 12, 2013)
$16.99 $12.75
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.