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Magic and Mystery in Tibet Paperback – June 1, 1971


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Magic and Mystery in Tibet + The Secret Oral Teachings in Tibetan Buddhist Sects + My Journey to Lhasa: The Classic Story of the Only Western Woman Who Succeeded in Entering the Forbidden City
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; Illustrated edition (June 1, 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486226824
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486226828
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #277,469 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation)

Customer Reviews

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This is information you will find nowhere else.
Barbara
A most remarkable book relating mystical events the author personally witnessed during her years living in Tibet as a woman lama.
D. Le
This book provides an excellent backdrop for the study and practice of buddhism.
Larry J. Babin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 85 people found the following review helpful By G.Evans on June 3, 1998
Format: Paperback
Intelligent, witty and insightful. Alexandra David-Neel was, to put it bluntly, "one hell of a woman." Her frank and colourful descriptions of Tibet make one yearn for the past. For example, the Lama with a plat of hair down to his feet, who wears golden earings and is dressed like some Chinese geni. I found her cutting and frank humour delightful, her scheptical comments forthright even when faced with inexplicable incidents that unfurl before her eyes. Considering that this book was first published in 1932, the lady was well before her time. New agers will have a challange catching up with her insights, let alone her knowledge of Buddist spirituality. Highly recommended!
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80 of 82 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 22, 1998
Format: Paperback
I have enjoyed this book for many years. It gives a colorful description of the more unusual aspects of Tibetan and Bon religious practice. One chapter, for example, interestingly called "Psychic Sports", describes the lung-gom-pas runners who run incredible distances while in a trance, warming oneself in the snow through psychic heat, telepathy, etc. The author was a hardy traveler and a practicing Buddhist -- and a no-nonsense observer of the world around her -- so her observations ring true. Since this book was written early in the century, it is refreshingly free of the political controversies that surround modern Tibet; instead, it describes an earlier, purer Tibetan culture, long before the Chinese tried to destroy it. I would have liked to meet this author -- she must have been a fascinating woman!
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 2, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This must be a classic book on Tibetan religion and mysticism. It is based on observations from some truly remarkable journeys in Tibet; I only wonder why the author restricts herself when relating what she has seen and heard. Part of the reason may be that she is a sceptical Western-style Buddhist and does not want to be judged as "airy-fairy" by her audience. Nevertheless, she tells of some absolutely fantastic occurences which are rendered even more authentic by her dry, understated style. A fearless person, she handles situations that would have scared most of us out of our wits! But for fear of ridicule, she could no doubt have written a much longer text on this subject.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By San Valentino on August 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
While many books about Buddhism and other historically eastern religions focus on high theology, the book describes Tibetan Buddhism as it was practiced in the early 20th century. It is fascinating.

I first read this book in college and have just read it again after many years. It was better the second time around.

The first time, I was entranced by the accounts of exotic magic and mystery. This time I searched for themes and Ms. David-Neel's viewpoint. Dealing with death is the primary theme underlying at least the popular practice of this religion. As for Ms. David-Neel, I was interested in her viewpoint and experience as a Buddhist who did not find the Tibetan version to be her paricular brand. Because of her distance from this version of Buddhism, her accounts of events that she saw or experienced personally are particularly interesting.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Evelyn Uyemura VINE VOICE on March 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
I suppose that Madame David-Neel was truly interested in practicing Buddhism as a means to enlightenment. After all, she went to a great deal of trouble to get to Tibet, learn Tibetan, meet lamas, stay in mountain retreats and borderland monasteries. She must have been a sincere seeker.

But perhaps the idea of a European actually learning truth from "Orientals" was too much for the reading public to handle. Perhaps David-Neel was giving people what they wanted when she wrote about magicians and tricksters and assorted weirdness. Whenever she gets close to her own inner life, she suddenly clams up, saying things like, Whether it is true or not, I can't say, though I have had experiences, but never mind that.

In any case, I found the description of the practice of chod deeply moving. It shares characteristics with Christ's experience on Calvary, and only a deep compassion for all beings could impel one to visualize one's whole being being sacrificed for the salvation even of demonic beings. I wish David-Neel could have been a little less ironic and a little more open about her own passion to learn from the lamas.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Larry J. Babin on July 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
I have just stumble on to the writings of Ms Neel. First, this book provides a view into the old traditions in Tibet that are not buddhist in nature but rather part of the old culture of Tibet. It provides a perspective on the old traditions versus the true practice of buddhism. The author takes a very knowledgeable approach to the pactice of magic and devination which is sometimes confused with the main line practice of buddhism. The author also explains in great detail some of the main practices of buddhism and includes a detail 3 fold explanation of "om mani padme hum". I was amazed that someone who was a very nice looking women who also perfomed opera and had many other accomplishments would put all that aside during the time period and travel to Tibet and learn all the languages in order to develop the insight that is present in her works. This book provides an excellent backdrop for the study and practice of buddhism.

Also, the practice in the monasteries in Tibet is illuminated. The point of the Theocracy vs true buddhism is brought out with the exposure of the sham and material based approach of those who are in the business of Buddhism versus those who are in practice of the middle way. The presentation is suttle but none the less obvious. Those following the middle way should read this book in order not to get caught in the web of Theocracy.
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