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Mahler: Symphony No. 3 in D Minor


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Audio CD, July 20, 1989
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$29.40 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Mahler: Symphony No. 3 in D Minor + Mahler: Symphony No. 2 + Mahler: Symphony No. 6 / Kindertotenlieder ~ Bernstein / Hampson
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Editorial Reviews

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Leonard Bernstein more or less owned this symphony, and both this and his earlier Sony recording are superb. He was one of the few conductors who wasn't afraid of the musical insanity that Mahler unleashes in the first movement (a collision between two marches of very different character), and the New York Philharmonic is one of the few orchestras in the world with the stamina to carry the whole thing off. This is the longest symphony ever written that's in the international repertoire, but listening to Bernstein's way with it, you'd never guess. This recording is also included in DG's magnificent box set of the complete Mahler symphonies. --David Hurwitz

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. Kräftig. EntscheidenNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:41$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Immer Das Gleiche TempoNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:12$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Tempo INew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:45$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Zeit LassenNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:15$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Zeit LassenNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:09$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Immer Dasselbe Tempo. (Marsch.) Nicht EilenNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:11$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Im Alten Marschtempo (Allegro Moderato)New York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:36$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 1 - 1. - Tempo INew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:54$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 2. Tempo Di Minuetto. Sehr MäßigNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:13$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen10. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 2. - L'istesso TempoNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 1:04$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen11. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 2. - A Tempo. (Wie Im Anfang)New York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:43$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen12. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 2. - Ganz Ploetzlich Gemaechlich. Tempo Di MenuettoNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:37$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen13. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 3. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne HastNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:42$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen14. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 3.- Wieder Sehr Gemaechlich, Wie Zu AnfangNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:57$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen15. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 3.- Etwas ZurueckhaltendNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:34$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen16. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 3.- Schnell Und Schmetternd Wie Eine Fanfare - Tempo I. Mit Geheimnisvoller HastNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 2:47$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen17. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 3.- Wieder Sehr Gemaechlich, Beinahe LangsamNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:33$0.99  Buy MP3 


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 4. Sehr Langsam. Misterioso Ppp - ''O Mensch! Gib Acht''New York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:49$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 4.- Più Mosso SubitoNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:45$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 5. Lustig Im Tempo Und Keck Im Ausdruck: ''Bimm Bamm. Es Sungen Drei Engel''James McCarthy 4:04$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6. Langsam. Ruhevoll. EmpfundenNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 5:04$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6.- Nicht Mehr So BreitNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:37$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6.- Tempo I. RuhevollNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:45$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6.- Nicht Mehr So BreitNew York Philharmonic Orchestra 4:36$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6.- Tempo INew York Philharmonic Orchestra 3:18$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Symphony No.3 In D Minor/Part 2 - 6.- Langsam. Tempo INew York Philharmonic Orchestra 7:41$0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Performer: Joseph Alessi, Glenn Dicterow, New York Choral Artists, Brooklyn Boys Chorus
  • Orchestra: New York Philharmonic
  • Conductor: Leonard Bernstein
  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (July 20, 1989)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B000001GAG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,372 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
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4 star
4%
3 star
12%
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See all 25 customer reviews
Simply the BEST Mahler's 3rd ever.
Colloredo von Salzburg
Possibly, but regardless of how one interprets it, the work is full of great Mahlerian music that doesn't require picky granular analysis to enjoy.
ewomack
It makes this symphony a very difficult piece to listen to, and perhaps Mahler's most inaccessible for the casual listener or Mahler novice.
A. Michaelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A. Michaelson on August 9, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Third is a very difficult piece to play and understand. Not only is the longest symphony in the standard repetoire, it also showcases Mahler's desire to show the entire universe in a symphony. There are more contrasts between light and dark, happy and sad, loud and soft, fast and slow, etc, in this symphony than in any other Mahler symphony. It makes this symphony a very difficult piece to listen to, and perhaps Mahler's most inaccessible for the casual listener or Mahler novice. That said, one must still agree that Bernstein gives this symphony a reading that is simply unforgettable. Bernstein manages emphasize the essential contrasting elements of the music, especially in the seemingly endless first movement, and keep the listener at the edge of his seat from the tension and emotion Bernstein elicits. Plus, this recording has excellent sound. Some of the best I've heard, in fact. The explosions are more explosive than in any other recording I've heard. It's something you have got to hear for yourself! I've grown to love this symphony and now it's one of my favorites; however, without this recording, who knows how positively I'd feel about this difficult (yet very fulfilling) composition.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 28, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is my favorite recording of Mahler's Third, which of all the symphonies gives perhaps the most indelible impression of Mahler the God-seeker and all-encompasser. The tempos and ensemble work are perfect throughout. There are none of the mannerisms that sometimes mar Bernstein's late interpretations of the Symphonies, and both conductor and orchestra show a perfect affinity for this difficult music. Never have I gotten so lost in golden reverie as in the third movement during the posthorn episodes, and the moving finale, a true vision of heaven, is perfectly paced.
If at first you don't quite "get" what Mahler was driving at, keep listening and you'll be won over. The first, second, and fifth movements might seem to lag in interest at first, but they come on strong with increasing familiarity.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Third Symphony is the biggest of the ten (in length, at least), and, it seems to me, probably the least performed. Whether that has to do with it's duration (100+ minutes) I'm not sure, but it is surely one of Mahler's most magnificent works. Leonard Bernstein is the Mahler Master, if there ever was just one, and the New York Philharmonic is as great a Mahler orchestra as any, especially with Lenny. The first movement is a bear; more than twice as long as the second and third movements combined. The Philharmonic performs splendidly through the section, culminating in a very energetic flourish. The third movement is harrowingly ironic, and Ludwig sings the fourth as darkly as anyone. The fifth movement, with it's treble choirs (female & children's voices) stands in stark contrast to the preceding one with it's up-beatness. The massive 6th movement is one of Mahler's finest creations: a solemn, religious Adagio that evolves from a gorgeous melody into a glorious hymn. It's something you have to hear, rather than read about.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By ewomack TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 8, 2005
Format: Audio CD
What a huge symphony. It's enormous. Both discs of this recording together run approximately an hour and forty-five minutes (64'12 + 41'40). Throughout this seemingly impossible span the melodic themes intertwine like celtic knots, the dynamics range from a whisper to a SCREAM, and along the way we meet Friedrich Nietzsche, a solo vocalist, and a boys choir. Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic pelt this one out with gusto, but some listeners have complained that Berstein meddles too much with the production (the symphony does balance on the fence of melodrama in places, and a steady guide needs to keep it from tipping into the mushy goo on the wrong side). The recording overflows with full lush strings and horns throughout giving it a very dramatic texture. It's not a piece or a recording suited for background music. It demands attention.

Six movements (in two parts) spontaneously and linearly create Mahler's symphonic world. Mahler originally drew up program notes to go along with the work's multifarious parts (with titles such as "Pan Awakes", "What the Animals in the Forest Tell me", "What the Angels Tell me", and "What Love Tells me"), but he later abandoned them as too stringent. He didn't want to shove his interpretation down the throats of his audience and stifle the carte blanche experience of listening.

The first movement (composed in 1896, a year after the following five movements) opens with a triumphal imposing horn blasting melody. Allusions to Brahms and Wagner lurk beneath the melodies and harmonies. The movement itself is as dynamic as the entire structure of the symphony. From loud and garrulous to near silence, the movement marches and trunches forth while throwing some diversions here and there along with some lovely solo violin speckles.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Erik North on April 2, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Mahler's Symphony No. 3 holds a distinction that no other work of classical music holds, that of being in the Guinness Book of World Records. The reason? Of all the symphonies in the active classical music repertoire, this is by far the longest, with an average performance time that routinely crosses the 100-minute barrier. Other works, including Schoenberg's "Gurrelieder", exceed this; but in the symphonic realm, this is one record that is unlikely ever to be broken. Every conceivable single kind of human, natural, physical, and spiritual emotion that has ever existed can be found in this gargantuan six-movement work, which incorporates material not only from Mahler's "Des Knaben Wunderhorn" song cycle, but also the Night Wanderer's Song of Nietzsche's "Also Sprach Zarathustra" (which would spur Richard Strauss on to compose his symphonic tone poem). Not surprisingly, the requirements for this work are mind breaking: a huge orchestra, a standard four-part chorus, a children's chorus, and a mezzo-soprano soloist. That, and a conductor capable of handling it all without collapsing on the podium. This, of course, is where Leonard Bernstein and his New York Philharmonic Orchestra come into play.

This recording of the Mahler Third, made before a live audience at Avery Fisher Hall in August 1986, more than lives up to this work's Guinness Book reputation; and in fact, because of Bernstein's typically immense conducting and (arguably) ultra-slow tempos, it is also perhaps the single longest recording of any symphony, Mahler or otherwise, anywhere on the planet, clocking in at close to 106 minutes, from the portentous horn-dominated opening bars to the tension-releasing conclusion in D Major.
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Mahler: Symphony No. 3 in D Minor
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