Mahler: Symphony No. 6

March 31, 1998 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
21:29
30
2
12:27
30
3
15:21
30
4
28:38
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 31, 1998
  • Release Date: March 31, 1998
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:17:55
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138EZNQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,874 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

A highly recommended contribution to any Mahler collection.
M. C. Maier
It is an amazing achievement considering its age and M6's lack of popularity at the time of recording.
Six Stringer
This helps to impart a more musically attractive quality overall to his recording.
Jeffrey Lee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Lee on April 23, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I sometimes think one would have to be an athlete to maintain the level of energy expended here by Bernstein in his often driving yet still sensitive account of the great Mahler Sixth. To cap it off, there is an absolutely jarring "hammer" crash at the close, though there is disagreement in regard to how powerful that final crushing blow should sound. Mahler himself eventually eliminated it altogether. Still, Bernstein includes it here, as have some others. Anyhow, both the searing and sensitive aspects of Bernstein's vision are immediately apparent. He is intense and capably catastrophic. His and Mahler's multifaceted development of the opening theme is colorful and vivid. There are also some memorable touches, including an eerie, dream-like presentation of the distant cowbells, followed soon thereafter by a poignant expression for violin. My only criticism applies to the second movement, where in some of the march-like trio sections, Bernstein is a little too deliberate in his shaping of the musical line. Here and elsewhere, however, he is excellent at portraying the darker side. In the third movement he very sensitively captures Mahler's sentimentality and bittersweetness. In contrast to Tennstedt, who also renders a very fine account, Bernstein (and perhaps the recording engineers) focus greater attention on the strings relative to the brass. This helps to impart a more musically attractive quality overall to his recording. I feel Bernstein's Mahler Sixth is one of the best renditions of his earlier cycle and one of the classic versions overall of this magnificent work.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By John Kwok HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on May 16, 2007
Format: Audio CD
I remain a great fan of the original analogue recording which is still in the Sony catalogue, but this digital image-bit remastering has enhanced the sound quality noticeably (I might add that for a 1960s recording made from a couple of live concert performances, the original sound quality was suprisingly quite good.). Here this fine recording shows a side of Szell which remains little known, as a steadfast champion of some of Mahler's vast symphonic scores. Stylistically, Szell was more interested in emphasizing orchestral textures and cohesion, than in emphasizing the emotional qualities of this score; an aspect of Bernstein's own interpretations of Mahler's symphonic scores which became quite pronounced in his 1980s Deutsche Grammophon recordings with the Royal Concertgebouw, Wiener Philharmoniker and New York Philharmonic orchestras. Hence, one might choose to compare George Szell more closely with Pierre Boulez, rather than with Leonard Bernstein, especially when Boulez has preoccupied himself with the overall sonic architecture of Mahler's scores, rather than trying to emphasize their melodramatic aspects. In both instances then, these two conductors have tended to minimize Mahler's Romantic side, adopting a more nuanced, Classical approach to conducting the Mahler 6th Symphony. And yet, Szell has done something which Boulez hasn't in his own Deutsche Grammophon recording with the Wiener Philharmoniker; emphasizing brisk tempi for each movement, so that the performance is just barely a few seconds over 75 minutes in length. So if you're interested in a cooler, if not quite dispassionate, interpretation of the Mahler 6th symphony, then Szell's live recording remains a primary choice (One which the editors of the Penguin Guide of Classical Music has honored by mentioning it as among the finest recordings of this symphony.).
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Santa Fe Listener HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 31, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Despite the shibboleth that Bernstein radically changed as a conductor in his old age, many of his Mahler interpretations stayed basically the same between the first cycle from NY in the Sixties and the one twenty years later from Europe. That's not the case here, however. There are very big differences between his 1967 reading--a bargain on a single mid-price Sony CD--and his 1988 Vienna version for DG, on two full-priced discs with the Kindertotenlieder as filler.

Sound: The NY Phil. is caught in totally clear sonics from Avery Fisher Hall. Inner detail is nicely captured, and the orchestral balance is natural. But we are in a different league with DG's digital recording from a live performance in Vienna's Musikverein, where the sonics have incredible urgency and impact.

Orchestra: The NY Phil. plays beautifully (although calling them the world's Mahler orchestra, as the Amazon reviewer does, is silly). Yet the Vienna Phil., even in a live setting, play with incomparable accuracy, power, sweetness, and style.

Interpretation: Bernstein in NY is fast enough in the first movement to be called brisk, which leaves no breathing room for the immense inner detail Mahler provides. Bernstein slows down by two min. in Vienna, which is all to the good. He also slows down by two min. in the Schrezo and the Andante--played in that order. They are also more expressive given a bit more leisure. But it's the last movement, which went from being one of the fastest on CD at 28 min. to the absolute slowest at 33 min., where the greatest improvement occurs. Here Bernstein creates a complete wowrld, full of magical color and haunting details. It becomes almost a symphony in itself--no music lover should pass up the experience of hearing it.
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