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Mahler: Symphony No. 3 [Hybrid SACD - DSD]

Mihoko Fujimura , Gustav Mahler , Jonathan Nott , Bamberg Symphony Orchestra Audio CD
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Price: $24.39 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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MP3 Music, 6 Songs, 2011 $17.98  
Audio CD, Hybrid SACD - DSD, 2011 $24.39  

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: I. Kraftig - EntschiedenMihoko Fujimura34:45Album Only


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
listen  1. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: II. Tempo di menuetto. Sehr massigMihoko Fujimura10:09Album Only
listen  2. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: III. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne HastMihoko Fujimura17:53Album Only
listen  3. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: IV. Sehr langsam. MisteriosoMihoko Fujimura11:01Album Only
listen  4. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: V. Lustig im Tempo und keck im AusdruckMihoko Fujimura 4:27$0.99  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Symphony No. 3 in D Minor: VI. Langsam. Ruhevoll. EmpfundenMihoko Fujimura25:55Album Only


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Product Details

  • Orchestra: Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
  • Conductor: Jonathan Nott
  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (August 30, 2011)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Hybrid SACD - DSD
  • Label: Tudor / BR Klassik
  • ASIN: B004Y7F4BU
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #103,768 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
(3)
3.3 out of 5 stars
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mahler Minus Lyricism November 15, 2011
Format:Audio CD
This is certainly a year for multiple releases of recordings of Mahler symphonies and it may become too much of a good thing. This particular recording of the Mahler 3rd Symphony - recorded during a live performance - is likely the longest 3rd on record. Jonathan Nott conducts the Bamberg Symphony Orchestra and chorus in this 2 CD release. While it is difficult to find much fault with the performance it is a bit disturbing to think that listening to an interpretation of Mahler ends up leading the audience to try to figure out why this isn't working well.

Mahler is quirky one moment and luxuriously indulgent in emotions the next, and it seems that this aspect of the 3rd symphony is what Nott wants us to notice. There are some truly lovely moments in the first (very long) movement, but they are served up like truffles or aperitifs: it is difficult to find the thread of connection under Nott's baton. The orchestra likewise has moments when the sound they produce is silken and eloquent, but there are many moments that sound a bit edgy and under rehearsed. Moving form one movement to the next lacks the amount of time (a recording decision?) to prepare the head for what is coming. The soloist is mezzo-soprano (not contralto) Mihoko Fujimura is a Japanese born artist who is well established at such venues as the Royal Opera Covent Garden,Teatro alla Scala Milano, Bayerische Staatsoper, Wiener Staatsoper, Bayreuther Festspiele, Theatre du Chatelet, Theatro Real Madrid, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Maggio Musicale Fiorentino und Aix-en-Provence Festival. Her operatic repertoire includes Kundry, Brangäne, Venus, Fricka, Carmen, Amneris,Eboli, Azucena, Melisánde, Idamante and Octavian. Fine credentials!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
By and large, the first three movements of Nott's new Mahler 3 are pretty good. The second movement, which basically functions as an Intermezzo ("what the flowers in the meadow tell me"), is especially well done. The third movement Scherzo is also well done, although the offstage trumpet - the so-called "Posthorn" - is probably a bit too close throughout (better than not being heard though!). But from the fourth movement on, there's a general lessening of steam.

In the vocal movement, Ms. Fugimura does exhibit a rather gorgeous instrument. But Nott's tempo is so slow, and his strings so ultra soft, that too much attention gets drawn upon Mahler's "hinauf ziehen" effect (pulling the sound upwards) on the solo oboe and cor anglais (English Horn). There's really nothing wrong with that, per se - especially since the soloists all do a nice job - but it does make the movement sound something like a trio for mezzo, oboe and cor anglais. And a rather slow one at that.

Much could have been salvaged if Nott had given us a more lively account of the brief "bim-bam" choral movement. But once again, the tempo and the singing are just a tad restrained. As a result, the contrasting middle section, in minor, ends up sounding a bit more sinister than usual. In the finale, Nott's Bamberg string section doesn't produce enough sound or amplitude to carry off the 25 minute expanse. The concluding brass chorale is nicely shaped, but the trombones 'fall down on the job' after the final cymbal crash. Compare this to Manfred Honeck/Pittsburgh Symphony (Exton), and you'll hear a world of difference. Honeck's string section produces a thick and luxurious sound that's a tad reminiscent of von Karajan's Berliners at their best.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
In a recent rather breathless review, The Gramophone declared that with this Mahler Third, Jonathan Nott "at last" can be spoken of as one of the world's great Mahlerians. The doughty old journal enjoys its once powerful role as star-maker, so even though the opinion comes from a single reviewer, one notices a consistent buildup of Nott's reputation in past reviews. I believe I've heard all the relevant recordings from Nott (as well as attending the Bamberg orchestra under him in concert), and nothing approaching greatness was evident. I will admit a bias against provincial orchestras being praised as if Hamburg, Stuttgart, and Bamberg are the equals of Berlin; in this Mahler Third, the Bambergers are about at the level of the BBC Scottish Sym. and a notch above the BBC Wales orchestra.

This makes a difference in Mahler, where raw energy and enthusiasm - which are in evidence here - don't count the same as virtuosity and world-class musicianship. For the sake of argument, let's leave those considerations aside. The Gramophone praises Nott, a 49-year-old Englishman educated at Cambridge, for leading a deeply thoughtful and thought-out reading, but frankly, the long first movement of the Third, one of the greatest challenges in all of Mahler, proceeds one event at a time under Nott, generally fast, with no special qualities. It's neither better nor worse than, say, the good-enough reading by David Zinman with his Zurich Tonhalle, although Nott's liberal use of rubato in the second movement, for example, sets him apart from a literalist like Zinman. What exactly are we supposed to be noticing that rivals Tennstedt, Levine, and Bernstein?

Nothing exceptional, for good or ill, happens in the middle movements.
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