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Maid of Constant Sorrow/Golden Apples of Sun Import, Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Import, Original recording remastered, November 5, 2001
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$9.99
$3.84 $4.72
$9.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Maid of Constant Sorrow/Golden Apples of Sun + Judy Collins: Original Album Series (Fifth Album / In My Life / Judith / Who Knows Where the Time Goes / Wildflowers) + Very Best of
Price for all three: $37.87

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Editorial Reviews

UK mid-price two-on-one reissue combines her first & second albums on one CD, 'Maid of Constant Sorrow' (1961) & 'Golden Apples of the Sun' (1962) both of which are out-of-print domestically. Includes new liner notes & rarely seen photos. 2001.

1. Maid Of Constant Sorrow
2. The Prickilie Bush
3. Wild Mountain Thyme
4. Tim Evans
5. Sailors Life
6. Bold Fenian Men
7. Wars Of Germany
8. O Daddy Be Gay
9. I Know Where Im Going
10. John Riley
11. Pretty Saro
12. The Rising Of The Mon
13. Golden Apples Of The Sun
14. Bonnie Ship The Diamond
15. Little Brown Dog
16. Twelve Gates To The City
17. Christ Child Lullaby
18. Great Selchie Of Shule Skerry
19. Tell Me Who Ill Marry
20. Fannerio
See all 24 tracks on this disc

Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 5, 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rhino/Wea UK
  • ASIN: B00005OKOO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #71,966 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 29, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This import CD reissues the first two Judy Collins albums from the early 1960s when she was singing traditional folk material with her crystal pure soprano voice accompanied by acoustic guitar. Collins had been trained as a classical pianist and when she turned to folk music she brought along the sensibilities of a classicist as she became one of the main interpreters of folk songs in the Sixties (choosing between Collins and Joan Baez as your personal favorite was the question of the day, not that you could go wrong with either selection).
"A Maid of Constant Sorrow" was released in 1961 and listening to it will surprise her fans because this is not the Judy Collins they are used to hearing. In retrospect it is clear that Collins is still learning how to use her voice to her advantage; she tends to stay more in her lower register at this point and the glorious high notes we associate with her singing is seen only in spots (e.g., "Wild Mountain Thyme"). But even in these early days there are some nice little gems, such as "The Pickilie Bush," "Tim Evans," and especially "John Riley." I especially liked her sea shanty "Sailor's Life," where her youthful enthusiasm helps carry the song along.
Her 1962 release "Golden Apples of the Sun" shows significantly more confidence as a singer. What is interesting to me is the obscurity of these traditional folk songs, although she does branch out into some other genres, such as gospel with "Twelve Gates to the City." The best tracks on this second album would be the title song, the ballad "Fannerio," and "Crow on the Cradle." Note: Spike Lee's father, Bill Lee, plays bass on this album.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mark D. Prouse on April 5, 2008
Format: Audio CD
By all rights, I should we reviewing the other twofer of early Judy Collins,3 & 4: JUDY COLLINS #3 / THE JUDY COLLINS CONCERT, because it wasn't until the 3rd album, I feel, that Judy finally found her true voice. What is very interesting to do, if you are a Judy Collins fan AND a Joan Baez fan (not so much if you already favor one over the other), is to directly compare the songs Judy did on these first two records with the common songs from the early Baez catalog. There is a tentative quality to Judy's approach completely absent from the Baez renditions of "Man [Maid] Of Constant Sorrow," "Wild Mountain Thyme," and "The Great Selchie of Shule Skerry" (titled "The Silkie" on JOAN BAEZ Vol. 2). However, it's on a couple of the exceptions, "John Riley" and "Fannerio," which rival the Baez versions, that we hear the seeds of Collins' artistic vision. On the first, a nice difference in the guitar figures augments a reading as deep and expressive as the Baez version is pretty. Where Judy's voice rises and swells with emotion, Joan is cold and distant, despite sounding gorgeous. On "Fannerio" (entitled "Fennario" on JOAN BAEZ IN CONCERT), Judy is strong and forceful, were Joan is light and lilting. These differences are what begin to separate the two women who helped to define the folk music revival of the late 50s and early 60s, and who both began to redefine the boundaries of what was "authentic" folk music. Judy sounded more like the troubador, whereas Baez was this lovely, remote and highly polished singer (although untrained -- Judy did have formal training, but it was in classical music and musical theatre).

When Collins came back with her third album, an immediate contrast bloomed with her rendition of "Anathea.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By mianfei on November 15, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Although Judy Collins is frequently seen as the lesser light of the early 1960s folk revival vis-a-vis Joan Baez, in fact the two were quite different. Whereas Baez was traditionally feminine in her vocal approach and at times almost spiritual in her musical approach, Collins at least in her early years was darker, deeper, harsher and more earthbound.

Anyone looking on these first two Judy Collins albums for something with traditional folk beauty will be seriously surprised by the intensity and darkness found in her performances. The opening track, the title tune of her first album "A Maid of Constant Sorrow" sets the tone with its quite un-nerving acoustic guitar and Collins' deep voice. The first side of that album is quite remarkable in its dark depths, especially in the intense murder tale "Tim Evans", where Collins' throaty vocals creates an atmosphere that approaches one of rage. "The Prickleye Bush" is almost as good, and even the seemingly upbeat "O Daddy Be Gay" on the second side possesses emotional intensity in an era when artistry was considered more significant.

Her second album, "Golden Apples of the Sun", covers the last half of the tracks here and is not quite so intense as "A Maid of Constant Sorrow". Nonetheless, it makes up for this slight deficiency with its heartbreaking sadness that announces itself from the opening title track. Quieter than Judy's first album, it is hard not to cry when listening seriously, and the heartbreaking character becomes even more apparent on "Tell Me Who I'll Marry" and "Twelve Gates to the City" which sound like nightmares if you try to imagine yourself in the position of the characters being sun about.
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