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Make Room Make Room Mass Market Paperback – May 5, 1955


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Ace (May 5, 1955)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441516041
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441516049
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,544,325 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Harrison’s fictions constitute one of the main monuments in modern SF.” —Paul Di Filippo, SciFi.com
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Harry Harrison, author of innumerable science fiction novels and stories, divides his time between Ireland and California.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

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Customer Reviews

A story without a happy ending.
dleigh
Unfortunately, a lot of this comes in the form of direct rants from Sol, which are fairly clumsy info/editorial dumps and not even all that necessary.
A. Ross
I love the movie Soylent Green, which is based on this book, and had heard that the book was substantially different than the movie.
koalaroo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

66 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 30, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book scared the hell out of me when I read it as a young teenager back in the 60's, because it was so believable. I was sure this was what the future of America held. At the time, overpopulation was a big issue, what with books like Paul Ehrlich's The Population Bomb, The 20th Century Book of the Dead by Gil Elliot, and so on, dramatizing the issue. There seemed no doubt in many people's minds that something similar to the world portrayed in this novel would be the reality in 35 years if nothing were done to halt the population explosion, and since nothing really was being done in that regard, this seemed like a foregone conclusion.
Well, 35 years later the world hasn't quite worked out this way, which still amazes me no end, although David Brin's recent novel, Earth, is an updated reprisal of this theme. Harrison's book is still a great read. Another book on the same theme that came out a few years later was John Brunner's novel, Stand on Zanzibar, which won a Hugo award for that year. So if you enjoyed this book you might also want to try these two novels.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Scott E. Amundsen on August 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It isn't often I like a film better than the novel on which it was based, but there is always the occasional exception that proves the rule.

MAKE ROOM! MAKE ROOM! is the novel that inspired the film SOYLENT GREEN, notable for its (at the time) shocker of an ending and the fact that it was Edward G Robinson's last film (and he delivered a wonderful performance that even got tears from his normally wooden co-star Charlton Heston). While the basic premise of the novel and the film are similar, the two versions take the story in entirely different directions.

The setting is the one thing that novel and film have in common: New York City, sometime in the not-all-that-distant future (1999 in the novel, 2022 in the film). Blanketed in a smog that turns the air brown, and sweltering under an oppressive heat wave, the basic setting may well be the most disturbing aspect of both the novel and the film, because climate change is now a reality and we may very well be heading where they point if we don't do something to stop it.

Overcrowded, with 35 million inhabitants crammed into what housing there is like so many sardines, Harrison's novel is even grimier than Orwell's NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, though the influences of Orwell, Huxley, and Zamiatin are in evidence here.

So the premise isn't terribly original, but let's face it: the futuristic dystopia is a sub genre of science fiction, which by its very nature makes it somewhat narrow, and similarities are bound to crop up. Harrison makes up for what he lacks in originality by making his characters real people. This is perhaps the only area in which the novel is superior to the film, since with the exception of Robinson's character most of the cast is right out of Central Casting.
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful By Heather L. Baker on August 21, 2008
Format: Kindle Edition
My less than stellar review is based on the ridiculous number of spelling and other editing errors. I don't know it is exclusively in the Kindle edition, but there was even a passage that made no sense, and then that same phrase showed up a paragraph later where it was supposed to be. I know the book was not expensive, but I still question if it was worth the money for such a poor quality edition.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By "carolyn5000" on January 19, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Make Room! Make Room!" is an excellent sci-fi novel which envisions our overcrowded future. It is a very entertaining read, with vivid characters and a neat premise. The book will make you realize how much you take simple things like drinking water and living with only your family members rather than strangers. I think this book needs to be reprinted, and am saddened that more books of this nature aren't written today.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By koalaroo on October 7, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love the movie Soylent Green, which is based on this book, and had heard that the book was substantially different than the movie. Many of my favorite ideas from the movie - the whole 'soylent green is people' concept, Sol's poignant suicide scene - are not present in the book; the plot lines are substantially different. Instead, the book develops a sensitive and beautiful relationship between the cop, Rusch, and the girl from the apartment, Shirl. These characters are exactly as they are in the movie, as are Sol and the police chief, but are more fully explored in the book. The background is the same dystopian vision of an overcrowded future. In the book I found this interesting backdrop used to tell a very realistic and somewhat bittersweet love story. Highly recommended.
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29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By James W. Van Scoyoc on August 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book comes from a time when the environmental movement was just getting under way, and Paul Ehrlich's "The Population Bomb" enjoyed pride of place on the bookshelves of environmentalists everywhere. It was also a time when it was easier to discuss overpopulation without drawing charges of racism. In the book (presumably), and in the 1973 movie Soylent Green (definitely), most of the characters and people seen in the street are white, as they would have been in 1966 and 1973. Hence there was no need to discuss issues of immigration and demographic shift, which are closely linked to America's soaring population today. As a result, in both the book and the movie, the issue of overpopulation is completely de-ethnicized, which makes it a universal, human problem. For that reason alone everyone should either read the book or see the movie.
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