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Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America Paperback – June 1, 1992

ISBN-13: 978-0226769677 ISBN-10: 0226769674 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226769674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226769677
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #594,876 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This cultural history examines the postwar period, in which television was installed in nearly two-thirds of the nation's homes and replaced the movie theater as the primary source of entertainment. Spigel, who teaches at the University of Southern California's School of Cinema-TV, analyzes other popular media, such as women's magazines, to show the ambivalent societal responses to this new technology, which promised both to unite and separate families. Though filled with academic jargon, the book is a thoughtful treatment of a neglected really? aren't there dozens of books about dawn of TV age?/gen says there aren't many books on this topic so please stet/pk area of study, which may interest students of popular culture and perhaps trigger some nostalgia. Spigel places the television in the context of changing technology, suburbanization and a redefinition of leisure. Soap operas and variety shows were designed to accommodate the work pattern of housewives. Spigel argues that television not only intensified the retreat to suburbia but also provided a new form of community. Surveying television comedies, she suggests that they gave viewers the opportunity to laugh at staged domesticity, but at the same time to feel closer to the scene of the action, thus crossing the border between fiction and reality. OK that 'fiction/reality' motif closes previous review as well?/stet both/pk
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Using sources ranging from articles and advertisements in women's magazines to sitcom scripts and sociological studies, Spigel (cinema and TV, Univ. of Southern California) traces the effects of television on American family life from 1948 to 1955. The advent of television in most homes had an impact not only on the viewers but on their viewing areas as well. Family relationships, women's roles within the household, and home interior design were all discussed in relation to television in the popular media. As Spigel notes in the epilog, she has "tried to forge various correspondences between what was said about television and the society in which those utterances were possible." She has shown "how the multiple, and often conflicting, middle-class ideals of postwar America gave way to contradictory responses to television in popular culture." Extensive research notes and contemporary illustrations grace this interesting, well-written account of the dawn of the television age.
-Carolyn M. Mulac, Chicago P.L.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Helen York on February 6, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not so much about what was ON TV so much as it is about how those programs reflected the American Family, sometimes in a kind of fun-house mirror. Americans invited the box into their homes, bringing the public sphere into the private sphere. In doing so they changed more than the layout of their living rooms. This book is a must-read for any student of Popular Culture, Television History or Post-War American History.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a must-read for Cultural Studies theorists specializing in TV. I used it as a primary source in my doctoral dissertation in the field.
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By Pouya Marvasti on October 1, 2014
Format: Paperback
The book arrived as a "very good" condition. However, the first 11 pages of the books are highly highlighted and there is writing all over it. This is not a "very good" conditioned book. At best it was acceptable because I couldn't read the first 11 pages and nothing was mentioned before I made the purchase. Very disappointing!
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kyanzasu on March 3, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Took an American Studies class at CSUF and needed this book. I believe it was $10 cheaper to buy online, and considering the prices at those stores, it's always nice to know you can find prices that aren't so ridiculous. The book came promptly, was packaged nicely, and the condition was as described.
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