Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.24 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 16 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 28? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Make Your Own Working Paper Clock Paperback


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.75
$5.10 $1.51 $40.00

Frequently Bought Together

Make Your Own Working Paper Clock + Karakuri: How to Make Mechanical Paper Models That Move + Paper Models That Move: 14 Ingenious Automata, and More (Dover Origami Papercraft) (English and English Edition)
Price for all three: $49.79

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 21, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060910666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060910662
  • Product Dimensions: 12.5 x 9.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #124,056 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
17
3 star
6
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 42 customer reviews
That said, it's a great project to learn about how clocks and timepieces operate.
Bill Winans
I brought along a piece of wire and the knitting needle and tried two sizes that fit very well - 3/32" and 1/8" worked well.
Thomas Bandy
It is a challange and it will take about a week to build if you work dilligently every night for about 1-2 hours.
anon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

124 of 124 people found the following review helpful By "hazydavy" on December 7, 1998
Format: Paperback
I'm building this clock now, and having a ball. Nonetheless, I'm here ordering a second copy because I messed up a key part--you have to be extraordinarily precise in assembling this clock. I have a few bits of advice:
- Save yourself some shipping costs and order two of these now.
- Use Aileen's Tacky Glue as your adhesive.
- Use as little glue as possible (very little).
- Have lots of clamps and weights on hand. I am using spring clothespins and lots of coins. I think surgical hemostats would help a lot, if I had any.
- Be liberal with X-Acto blades. I may well use 50 on this project.
- Spend no more than an hour a day on this. Personally, if I spend more than that, I get impatient and make mistakes.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
57 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Peter Rowe on August 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
This project requires considerable time and patience but you *can* end up with a clock that really works. As previously mentioned I think the best strategy to to work about an hour or so each evening, it took me too months to complete the clock with extra hours on weekends. It works! The key is the gears. The main issue is the concentricity of the gear wheels -- in other words, their outer edge rotates a constant distance from the center. Get this wrong and the wheels will bind as they rotate against one another. Two problems: finding the center, and constructing the gear wheels consistently. The first gear you meet is the main drive wheel, it took me a week to construct. Put an axl in it and spin it to make sure it's concentric as you build. Make sure the inner mesh gears of the secondary gear (and others) are consistent (no teeth wider or narrower than others, trim them with a exacto knife if needed. Tip: they should be bent into an straight accordian shape before glue, this way you can see that all teetch are even. The main gear and secondary innner gear are most important -- up to the escapement. The later hand gears are no problem. Once complete you need to patch, trim, reposition axles, cut... Note that on the book cover the squished main gear teeth that the author adjusted to make the wheel concentric!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By William T. Lockman Jr. (lockman@aepnet.com) on October 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
As the author claimed, you cut the book into about 160 peices then glue and assemble them into a working clock. I just finished making my clock. It didn't work. The pinions and gears just didn't mesh right. There must be tricks to get the precision of alignment necessary for the clock to run, but the author revealed none of them. Lining things up by eye, and being very careful just isn't enough. I was surprised to read other reviews where the clocks worked. Even so, I was amazed at the engineering of these paper parts, and am considering ordering a couple more books from which to re make parts (the author recommends this from the start). At the very least, reading this book, and making the clock from it, will leave one with a very good understanding of how such clocks work, but not necessarily an understanding of how to make clocks that work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Patrick on April 12, 2008
Format: Paperback
Length: 0:44 Mins
Here is how the finished product looks like. Cool, isn' it?
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Carrie Clayburn on February 3, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an interesting design for a clock. I put mine together in about a month (working several hours a night). When I noticed a couple of design flaws. The gears are not going to mesh very well, no matter how well you put it together. Also, since you must use wire for the pivots the clock hands are going to be extremely difficult to get to move properly since you cannot securely fasten the gears to the pivots. However, it looks great when you finish it! I did not put the cover on because I like to see the gears. Since I don't use mine as a clock I painted the gears and use it as reference for when I build wooden clocks. If you want to make a working clock I strongly suggest looking into making a wooden one. There are lots of free plans available online. I recommend a website called Gary's Wooden Clocks. This website has lots of information, tips, clock plans, downloads and links for the clock building enthusiast.

In short, this is a good introduction to clock making but is not its self a good clock.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Ho on April 11, 2005
Format: Paperback
After 3 weeks of late night work, I finally finished it yesterday. At the beginning the pendulum only swung 5 to 6 times and then stopped. After tuning the position of wheels 3 times, now my clock can keep ticking for couple hours. It is very cool!

However, it is very difficult to set time in this clock. But that's okay to me, coz I don't expect it to show correct time anyway.

Some suggestions:
- as all other reviewers said, all the cutting must be very precise.
- Get yourself a pair of "normally closed" tweezers and of course a pair of regular tweezers as well. It helped me a lot when gluing pieces together.
- I used knitting needles instead of wire for axles. I used 2.25mm (US #1) for axles for motor wheel and minute hand, and 1.5mm or 1.75mm (US #000 and #00) for other axles
- I cut a big rectangular hole on the face, and removed the case, so that people can see the cool wheels inside
- I have to tilt the whole clock to the right a bit, or else the pendulum will stop swinging after a few seconds
- I added two quarters to the end of pendulum rod, which seems to help a little bit
- Make sure you get your wife's approval on making this clock, because for sure you will be spending many nights on this project
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa611a4f8)