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Making Artisan Pasta: How to Make a World of Handmade Noodles, Stuffed Pasta, Dumplings, and More Flexibound – January 1, 2012


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Product Details

  • Flexibound: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Quarry Books (January 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592537324
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592537327
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,547 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"James Beard Award winner Green teams up again with photographer Legato (after The Fishmonger’s Apprentice) to produce a beautifully photographed directory on how to make all types of pasta in your own kitchen, with just a few kitchen tools. And don’t think only of Italian—there are a few representative recipes from other countries, such as pot stickers, pierogi, and udon noodles. Recipes vary by shape, flour type, and flavoring. By following the easy, step-by-step instructions and hundreds of photographs, readers will be inspired to make their own delicious creations. The book contains many useful extras such as nutrition information, resources, and a glossary, but those who want to serve a homemade sauce along with their pasta fresca may need to consult another resource. VERDICT: This is a terrific choice for any library as it will be useful for both experts and novices alike. Mangia!"—Library Journal

About the Author

Aliza Green is an award-winning Philadelphia-based author, journalist, and influential chef whose books include The Butcher's Apprentice and Making Artisan Pasta(Quarry Books, 2012),The Fishmonger's Apprentice(Quarry Books, 2010), Starting with Ingredients: Baking (Running Press, 2008) and Starting with Ingredients (Running Press, 2006), four perennially popular Field Guides to food (Quirk, 2004-2007), Beans: More than 200 Delicious, Wholesome Recipes from Around the World (Running Press, 2004) and successful collaborations with renowned chefs Guillermo Pernot and Georges Perrier.A former food columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Cooking Light Magazine, Green is known for her encyclopedic knowledge of every possible ingredient, its history, culture, and use in the kitchen and bakery and for her lively story-telling. Green also leads culinary tours--her next is scheduled for October 2013 to Puglia, Italy, which she calls "land of 1,000-year-old olive trees." Green's books have garnered high praise from critics, readers, and culinary professionals alike, including a James Beard award for "Best Single-Subject Cookbook" in 2001 for Ceviche!: Seafood, Salads, and Cocktails with a Latino Twist (Running Press, 2001), which she co-authored with Chef Guillermo Pernot. For more information about Aliza's books and tours or to send her a message, visit her website at http://www.alizagreen.com.

Steve Legato is a freelance photographer specializing in food, restaurant industry, cookbooks and advertising. His work has been featured in Art Culinaire, The New York Times, Food and Wine, Wine Spectator, Food Arts, GQ, Departures, Wine & Spirits, Travel & Leisure, Philadelphia Magazine, Delaware Today, New Jersey Monthly and Main Line Today. He resides just outside of Philadelphia, PA. Visit his website at http://www.stevelegato.com.


More About the Author

Aliza Green, the Philadelphia-based cookbook author, journalist and pioneering chef, is the author of thirteen highly successful cookbooks including her newest, The Soupmaker's Kitchen, to be published July 1st and available now for pre-sale on Amazon. Her Making Artisan Pasta, a step-by-step full color guide to making a world of fresh pasta has been garnering outstanding reviews and strong sales. It was selected by Cooking Light Magazine as one of its Top 100 Cookbooks of the Last 25 Years--quite an honor in a field of thousands!

Researching Making Artisan Pasta in Italy inspired Green to gather a small group of food lovers to explore the Southern Italian region of Puglia, which she calls, "land of 1,000-year-old olive trees", in a tour taking place October 2 to 9, 2013. The group will be visiting wineries, experiencing the region's best and most authentic restaurants, markets, and artisan food producers, exploring world cultural sites, and will join in two cooking classes. For details, visit WWW.ALIZAGREEN.COM and click on the Puglia tour page.

Green's book, The Butcher's Apprentice, (Quarry Books, 2012) contains fascinating interviews with a rancher raising Japanese Wagyu cattle, a couple who produce Italian-quality prosciutto in Iowa because that's where the pigs are, a Jewish deli owner, a "new wave" hunter, a humane slaughterhouse designer, and an chef in Umbria who serves only meat from her family's farm. Interspersed are clear, full-color step by step techniques for cutting and trimming various types and cuts of meat and poultry that even the novice will be confident enough to try.

The perfect companion book is her Field Guide to Meat: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Meat, Poultry, and Game Cut (Quirk Books 2005) earned top praises from Food & Wine and Real Simple.

The Fishmonger's Apprentice (Quarry Books 2011) is full of step by step techniques for working with everything from geoduck to swordfish, from abalone to crayfish, flatfish and round fish. Interviews with experts in fishing like the five Portuguese families who started the sustainable American Albacore Tuna Association, a third-generation lobsterman from Maine, the manager of the Honolulu wholesale fish auction, and person who runs London's Billingsgate Fish Market, which has been in continuous operation for over 1,000 year! The book comes with a DVD showing Aliza preparing a dozen fish and seafood dishes plus recipes from renowned chefs.

Field Guide to Produce: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Fruit and Vegetable at the Market (Quirk Books 2004), was recommended by the New York Times, Men's Health, and Shape and has sold over 50,000 copies. Her personal favorite is Field Guide to Herbs & Spices (Quirk Books 2006), a compact guide to common but also rare and unusual spices from around the world. Field Guide to Seafood (Quirk Books 2007) is a complete guide to choosing fish and shellfish, whether you live in the US or abroad. The series of four food field guides is a must on the shelves of food writers, editors, and culinary students.

Her masterly Starting with Ingredients: Quintessential Recipes for the Way We Really Cook was published to outstanding reviews. With over 550 recipes and detailed, practical, information about the background, culture, history, and uses of 100 important ingredients, this book flies off the shelves in the United Stated and Canada. Starting with Ingredients: Baking does for baking what the first book did for general cooking in 60 chapters. Find uncommon international recipes, detailed ingredient information, and dozens of invaluable tips.

¡Ceviche!: Seafood, Salads, and Cocktails With a Latino Twist (Running Press 2001), which Green co-authored with chef Guillermo Pernot, received a James Beard Award for "Best Single Subject Cookbook." Her book, The Bean Bible: A Legumaniac's Guide to Lentils, Peas, and Every Edible Bean on the Planet! (Running Press 2000), was described by Booklist as "a comprehensive guide to the world of beans and bean cookery belongs in every cookbook collection." When Running Press re-released it as as Beans: More than 200 Delicious, Wholesome Recipes from Around the World with new photographs and recipes, the book appeared in a New York Times feature on top holiday cookbooks.

The beautiful oversized book, Georges Perrier: Le Bec-Fin Recipes (Running Press 1997) features a collection of recipes from Philadelphia's landmark restaurant that Green co-wrote with the renowned French chef.

Green has conducted numerous cooking classes, had many television appearances and radio interviews, and is a highly reputed television and print food stylist. As one of the pioneer chefs who helped make the city of Philadelphia a dining destination, Green began her career in the mid-1970's as Executive Chef at the renowned Ristorante DiLullo, where her culinary achievements landed the restaurant a prestigious four-star rating. In 1988, The Philadelphia Inquirer inducted Chef Green into its Culinary Hall of Fame, citing her as one of the ten most influential people in the city's food industry for her uncompromising efforts at working with local farmers.

Green cites her childhood, which she spent traveling and living abroad, as the inspiration for her culinary pursuits. She has been reading about, writing about and preparing and perfecting food for most of her life. Today, Green spends her time writing food guides and cookbooks, consulting to restaurants and institutional food service providers, teaching, and leading culinary tours.

Customer Reviews

I searched and searched for a recipe book on how to make handmade pasta dough.
Jenn
I recently learned to make pasta from scratch and am looking forward to trying out the recipes in this book.
Swist
This is a great book with very easy step by step instructions and great pictures for even a beginner.
TDNP718

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

253 of 254 people found the following review helpful By Becky in NOLA TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 6, 2012
Format: Flexibound Verified Purchase
Length: 4:08 Mins
I have a lot of cookbooks, anymore it takes a pretty special cookbook to get my heart thumping and inspires me to immediately take it in the kitchen and get to cooking. Making Artisan Pasta is just such a book. I have other pasta books, such as the joy of pasta, and usually they are maybe 25% actual pasta recipes, and the rest is sauce or soup or casseroles using the pasta. There is nothing wrong with that, but Making Artisan Pasta is a book about the pasta, about what ingredients to use, how to use them, how to make the pasta, form the pasta, and tons and tons of ideas and tips on making amazing pasta.

The pictures are simply inspirational. From step by step photos of how to accomplish making the pasta, to beautiful and inspiring finished products. This book could be intimidating, working with dough and various ingredients and appliances and gadgets, making different shapes. But it's totally not, Aliza Green writes clear simple instructions that would make the most dough-frightened person feel enabled to make luscious pasta. Between her clear instructions and tips, and Steve Legato's amazingly clear instructional photos, this is a book to really give a person confidence and a can-do attitude.

There are some pastas that simply call for special gadgets to make them, it's the nature of the pasta, but if you don't want to spend a penny on new fun equipment there are still plenty of pasta recipes you can easily make. The author gives several techniques on how to make pasta. She gives three ways of mixing (hand, stand mixer, food processor) and different ways to roll out the pasta- rolling pin, sheeter (hand cranked pasta machine) and the extruders.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Sherri Dodsworth on January 7, 2012
Format: Flexibound Verified Purchase
I have recently gotten into making homemade pasta and was looking for a book to provide me with a variety of recipes, techniques and education on various types of pasta and this slim volume totally delivered on that request. It is also filled with gorgeous color photos on evey page illustrating step-by-step instructions for producing perfect pasta every time. This is not a source book for sauce recipes - this focuses solely on making the pasta itself. I like its focus on simple, inexpensive hand tools rather than expensive gadgetry, and its in-depth info on various aspects of the simple ingredients used to create great pasta at home. I highly recommend this book.

http://www.amazon.com/Making-Artisan-Pasta-Handmade-Dumplings/dp/1592537324/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325997788&sr=1-1
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100 of 113 people found the following review helpful By Kristi Gilleland TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 19, 2012
Format: Flexibound Verified Purchase
I have recently acquired a pasta machine. I was just wanting to make simple pasta and looking for recipes. This book is maybe more for someone looking to make really, really fancy pasta or maybe sell pasta. it had a purist sort of bent to it. It went into wooden dies and hand shaping pasta, and it did have some recipes just for the pasta itself. It has lots of pictures.
One thing that raised my eyebrow a bit was the discussion on eggs. The author goes into a detailed discussion of eggs but I was left feeling like maybe she really didn't know much about them in spite of the fact she wrote a lot about them. For instance, we have free range chickens, and the best eggs are the ones right out from under the chicken, but the author says eggs aren't good for 2 days after they are laid. I suppose my family would just disagree. Also, she leaves out a very important tip about fresh eggs, that the easiest way to tell if one is bad is just to float it in water. Good eggs don't ever float. The best sink quick.
This book would be great for you if you are looking for sources to buy wooden or high end pasta shapers and plates.
If, however, you're an every day cook that has a pasta maker and could care less if your plates are bronze vrs plastic, there might be better beginner books out there. I'm going to try to find another one that's more appropriate for a beginner like me.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Eric J. Goodemote on February 29, 2012
Format: Flexibound
This book is wonderful; I was a complete pasta-making novice when I received it as a gift and I managed to succeed in making great pastas right away by following the clear, concise instructions in this book. The large, colorful pictures aren't merely pretty to look at; they offer a crucial benchmark against which to judge the success of your pasta-making endeavors. I particularly liked seeing how my own Ukrainian cherry dumplings looked like the ones in the book's pictures. It gave me a gratifying sense that I'd gotten it right.

Another nice touch is that the book doesn't limit itself to Italian pastas, but explores many noodle-making traditions from around the world, and you'll find global favorites among its pages such as Japanese udon noodles, Chinese pot-stickers, Turkish manti, and Polish pierogis.

While this book will provide hours of delicious amusement, I do regret that it contains a lot of recipes requiring specialized equipment that cannot be used for anything else. Unless you're willing to shell out about $40 for a cavatelli machine or $60 for a corzetti stamp, some of the recipes in this book will be off limits to you. I would also have appreciated a little more guidance on obtaining some of the less common ingredients. Recommendations on how to obtain good chestnut flour for the vast majority of readers who have never even seen it before would be nice, for example.

All the same, I would recommend this book with great enthusiasm to anyone considering taking up pasta-making as a hobby. I would love to see the author turn this into a series, with another book or two containing more recipes.
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