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Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists Paperback – November 17, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0071741675 ISBN-10: 0071741674 Edition: 1st

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Making Things Move DIY Mechanisms for Inventors, Hobbyists, and Artists + 507 Mechanical Movements: Mechanisms and Devices (Dover Science Books) + Basic Machines and How They Work
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics; 1 edition (November 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071741674
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071741675
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dustyn Roberts is a traditionally trained engineer with non-traditional ideas about how engineering can be taught.  She started her career at Honeybee Robotics as an engineer on the Sample Manipulation System project for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, scheduled for launch in 2011.  In 2006 she founded Dustyn Robots after consulting for two artists during their residency at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in NYC.  She continued consulting projects for students and artists while working full time at Honeybee, and eventually moved to consulting full time on projects ranging from gait analysis to designing guided parachute systems. In 2007, she developed a course for NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program called Mechanisms and Things That Move that led to the book you see here.  She also participated in the pilot of Battle of the Geeks where her team designed and launched a rocket across a canyon in Africa, and has attracted media attention by Time Out New York, IEEE Spectrum, and local organizations.  

Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University with minors in Robotics and Business, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and is currently working on a PhD in Mechanical Engineering at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University.  She currently lives in New York City with her partner, Lorena, and cat, Simba.

More About the Author

Dustyn Roberts is a traditionally trained engineer with non-traditional ideas of how practical engineering can be taught. She started her career at Honeybee Robotics as an engineer on the Sample Manipulation System project for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, scheduled for launch in 2011. In 2006 she founded Dustyn Robots after consulting for two artists during their residency at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center in NYC. She continued consulting projects for students and artists while working full time at Honeybee, and eventually moved to consulting full time on projects ranging from gait analysis to designing guided parachute systems. In 2007, she developed a course for NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program called Mechanisms and Things That Move that led to the book that you see here. She also participated in the pilot of Battle of the Geeks where her team designed and launched a rocket across a canyon in Africa, and has attracted media attention by Time Out New York, IEEE Spectrum, and local organizations.

Dustyn holds a BS in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University with minors in Robotics and Business, an MS in Biomechanics & Movement Science from the University of Delaware, and is currently working on her PhD at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University. She lives in New York City with her wife, Lorena, and cat, Simba.

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Customer Reviews

Your book is easy to read, informative, and very well laid out.
Scotttechguy
It covers everything from basic electronics to fabricating metal and wood parts for your projects.
Tekkie
If your just getting started or you want to learn more about how things work this is a great book.
leslie rosales

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 58 people found the following review helpful By M. Petit on December 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a paper engineer and artist with some electronic experience, I have found that learning about gears, pulleys, motors, and the actual mechanics of getting things to move somewhat daunting. There are basic books geared towards beginners as well as books filled with inspiring complex examples that are impossible to navigate unless you already have a high level of expertise. This book is the book I've been looking for. It is really useful and very comprehensive in its approach and scope. It starts with the basics, but, takes you through a wide array of materials, techniques, and examples. Its section on motors (and arduino control) is great. I think its a fantastic book for students and individuals with varying skills, experience, and interests. Highly recommend it.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By John M on December 26, 2010
Format: Paperback
I'm sure the way you respond to this book will depend heavily on your experience level as a mechanical and electronics tinkerer. I happen to be right in the bullseye of the author's target audience: this book is perfect for where I am in my informal education in those areas. My favorite part is that Ms. Roberts makes specific recommendations for tools and for parts and materials sources. The information is presented in a very logical order. It is intentionally not too deep - just the bare essentials to get you started experimenting. But with plenty of information about how to go further. If you want to learn how to build machines that move, this is a great place to start.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By moreecstatic on December 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
I have been waiting for this book! I teach product design at a local university, and my students often have questions that I can't answer about topics discussed in Making Things Move. The language here is perfectly suited for this purpose, the information is very clear and the example projects are nicely explained and documented. The hand sketches are great, because they capture the excitement of making things, and put one in the mood to start sketching and inventing! Thanks to this author for producing a needed book that will help many non-professional people as they try their hand at mechanical design and robotics.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By William E. Wagner III on February 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have a PhD and teach Electronics at a university and this is a great introduction to mechanical movements. Most of my students are interested in robots and this book provides easy to understand explanations and sources for the materials. I have also helped FIRST Robotics teams and again this is a great reference. I was also impressed with the projects in the book. These would make great starting points for science fair projects or class room demonstrations. Each of the many topics is covered in enough depth to cover the basics with references listed to find more information. Many examples are given of actual parts with detailed descriptions of the specification sheets.

I did notice one mistake. On page 101 of the paperback version, it says that alternating current fluctuates between 0V and 120V. It actually fluctuates from about 169 V below ground to 169 V above ground. It supplies the same average power as a 120 V DC source, which is why it is called 120 V AC. This is a minor mistake in an otherwise great book.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Djair Guilherme on December 31, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an amazing book that really delivers what it promises. Excellent reference material. I had never learned physics in a way as interesting as the one presented by the author. Recommend.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Trimbler12 on January 31, 2011
Format: Paperback
I really really enjoyed this book. For me, the best part was that it made all of the concepts seem attainable a a non-technical person like myself. I'm working on building my first robot right now and so far the ideas I've picked up here and coming in very very handy.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. Kelly on March 12, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I deal mainly with the age groups of 8 to 15, so this book is a welcome addition to my library. While many of the concepts in the book do require some math skills and the language/style of the writing isn't geared towards the 8-12 age group, the concepts by themselves are explained fairly easily and in simple language that I believe most kids will be able to follow (or at least spark enough curiosity to hunt down a parent or teacher to ask for help). Starting out with a good discussion on the 6 basic types of machines - lever, pulley, wheel and axle, inclined plane/wedges, screws, and gears - it just gets even better from there.

She covers:

* materials
* Fastening techniques
* Friction and Torque (I learned a LOT in this chapter)
* Power/Work/Energy
* Types of motors and how to control them
* Bearings, couplers, etc...
* way much more...

10 chapters in all, with projects galore to test what you've learned... it's an outstanding book. (She even throws in a breadboard and Arduino summary/primer in the back of the book.)

With lots of photos and great hand sketches, this book would make a great gift to any budding engineer, tinkerer, robot fanatic, and/or DIYer. I read it in a few days and am amazed at the amount of information packed into this book.
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28 of 36 people found the following review helpful By stephane on June 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is a very fun and approachable book to getting started and excited about building/making things. I find this book is great for building the vocabulary needed to understand and build things. It's an easy read and is very digestible.

My biggest complaint is the disappointing electrical sections. The author spends effort trying to build intuition on mechanical devices; however this treatment stops when it comes to electrical design. The primary effort to give the reader intuition on circuits has a grotesque error (pg 102 fig 504) in the circuit diagram where the capacitor is misconnected (should be in parallel, not series!)

The author presents some basic equations such as ohms law, but does not provide examples on how it's used. A missed opportunity is when she explains diodes; instead she simply states a 220k resistor with 5V supply should be fine with most LEDs. The reader is lost what to do in any other situation.

While she provides detailed information on how to read mechanical data sheets for browsing McMaster; on the circuit side, all of this is missing on basic devices such as resistors, leds, transistors or capacitors. The reader will be completely lost attempting to browse the dizzying array of parts at digikey or mouser. The reader is pointed to canned solutions provided in the text with little intuition to expand or modify.

The author advocates the importance of sketching out mechanical diagrams, yet does not mention or even show any circuit schematics. Without understand how to read a schematic, it is difficult, if not impossible to communicate design and debug broken ones. Instead she attempts to communicate circuit diagrams with black and white pictures of bread boards...
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