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Making Out in Chinese: Revised Edition (Mandarin Chinese Phrasebook) (Making Out Books) Paperback – September 15, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Making Out Books
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Tuttle Publishing; Revised edition (September 15, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804833907
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804833905
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 4.3 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #533,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Cheesy title but actually a good reference! Have to remember that this is still a Tuttle book. Has pinyin with tone marks AND characters. The language is also (presumably) not the stuffy phrasing you find in textbooks, but none of that outrageous slang nobody really uses, or would dare to use." —Goodreads

About the Author

Original edition by Ray Daniels who studied Chinese as an exchange student in Taiwan and Beijing. He met his Chinese wife in a tea shop in Taiwan.

Revised by Haiyan Situ, a Beijing native who has taught Chinese at the University of Otago, New Zealand.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 20, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is full of useful colloquial slang expressions, as well as good conversational phrases. Its sections are divided by theme (e.g., Basic Phrases, Getting Acquainted, I've Got the Munchies, etc.) which make finding phrases pretty easy.
My only gripe is that the author does NOT use standard "pinyin" phonetics to write out the Chinese words in the Roman alphabet. It seems as though he has modified the standard pinyin consenants and vowels in an effort to make it sound more like real English pronounciation. This is great for someone who has never studied Chinese using the standard pinyin system, but for some who has trained themselves to read pinyin (which is a screwy system to begin with) the phrases in the book are difficult to pronounce, and more importantly, difficult to memorize (through visual symbolic recognition based on already-learned words).
I would hope that a new revision of the book be written for standard Chinese pinyin, if possible.
P.S. The phrases and words related to sexual intercourse are in good number and detail. The author did not abstain from including even the dirtiest of phrases.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ultimate Reviewer on January 20, 2004
Format: Paperback
The new edition, which has been revised by someone other than the original author now contains Chinese characters, Pinyin and a simplified pronunciation guide for each entry. If you are looking for a complete guide to slang then this book is disappointingly thin on the ground. It gives one way to say something, that is a valid way, but it misses out other ways that are just as likely to be encountered in common, everyday usage. I was impressed with some of the attention to cultural, idiomatic usage, that was very helpful, such as the euphemistic way Chinese people refer to a woman's level of beauty. Finally, one caveat with learning Chinese - If you are starting out, you can't learn to pronounce it well from a book alone, even if it does include Pinyin, or other make-shift phonetics, as this one does. You just won't be understood. For the price, this book is OK, but just OK. I feel that a lot more could have been included and hope that the publisher will produce a follow up like they did with "Making Out in Japanese".
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Laura De Giorgio TOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 6, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very small phrase book. As far as phrase books go, it contains much less information than any regular sized phrase book. As such, it may be most suitable for someone who knows no Chinese and would like to learn just a few expressions.

On the other hand, this booklet does include few slang expressions, some insults, dating and sex-related language which you won't find in a regular phrase book.

All words / expressions are written in English, in Chinese simplified characters, and in pinyin.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DocCaligari on November 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a review of _Making Out in Chinese_ (revised edition) by Ray Daniels.

When you learn any foreign language in an academic setting, your teachers begin with the standard, "proper" vocabulary and grammatical constructions. This is as it should be. You cannot understand the exceptions until you understand the rules, and slang changes too quickly to be built into the textbooks. However, at some point you need to branch out and learn more specialized terms and expressions. The "Making Out Phrase Book Series" from Tuttle (a respected language learning publisher) is designed to address this need. (The fact that many copies of this book will just be bought as novelty items or gag gifts does not detract from its serious use.)

The selling point of this slim volume is its vocabulary, phrases and slang related to romance and sex, but it also includes sections on topics like "Basic Phrases" and "Getting Acquainted." This book is obviously intended for use by those with little or no background in the Chinese language. The Introduction explains how to pronounce the tones of the standard Mandarin dialect. The main text tells you how to pronounce phrases, using the Pinyin phonetic system (the one you would learn in school), but it accompanies this with a non-standard, "intuitive" romanization. (So "Thank you" is both "Xie xie" and "Shieh-shieh," with tone marks in each case.) Chinese characters for phrases are provided, which is useful if you can read them, but also helps if you just want to point to an expression like "Where is the restroom?" instead of trying to pronounce the question yourself. (Characters are given in simplified form, the standard in the People's Republic, and the phrases are taught with a Beijing accent.
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17 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
The first problem with this book is the lack of Chinese characters making it virtually worthless for more advanced Chinese learners. Secondly the romanisation is not pinyin, nor any other recognisable system. Thirdly this should be entitled "making out in Taiwanese" as a good 20~30 percent of the phrases in the book would not be recognised by mainlanders.
If you want a book on Chinese slang then get either 'Mutant Mandarin' or 'Outrageous Chinese' by James Wang (China Books, San Francisco) although these include a lot of liumang and Beijing punk slang that doesn't travel well, or Li Shu Juan's 'Chinese-English Dictionary of Modern Slang in China' (ISBN 962-238-222-3, Hong Kong) the only failing of which is to not always distinguish Cantonese and Northern slang.
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