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Making Sense Out of Suffering Paperback – July 1, 1986


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Servant Books; Second Printing edition (July 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0892832193
  • ISBN-13: 978-0892832194
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,423 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter Kreeft, professor of philosophy at Boston College, is the author of such well-received books as Between Heaven and Hell; The Unaborted Socrates; Yes or No?: Straight Answers to Tough Questions About Chrisitanity; Heaven: The Heart's Deepest Longing; and Prayer: The Great Conversation

More About the Author


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--- NEW! -- Charisms: Visions, Tongues, Healing, etc. (feat. Dave Nevins)

---"Beauty" -- The branch of philosophy dealing with aesthetics.
---"C. S. Lewis and Mere Christianity" -- C.S. Lewis' masterpiece
---"Christianity in Lord of the Rings" -- The cleverly disguised role of God
---"Culture War" -- A call to arms, mapping key enemies and battlefields
---"Existence of God" -- A magnificent overview of the arguments
---"Good, True, Beautiful" -- C.S. Lewis on three great transcendentals
---"Happiness" -- How do you get it? Christ's version vs. the world's
---"Heaven" -- The heart's deepest longing
---"Hollywood Screenwriting" -- Encouragement to film's creative storytellers
---"If Einstein Had Been a Surfer" -- Rediscovering intuitive thinking
---"Lord, Liar, or Lunatic" -- The famous argument for Christ's identity
---"Problem of Pain" -- C.S. Lewis's brilliant exposition on suffering and evil
---"Sex in Heaven" -- Imaging the fire of God's love
---"Sexual Reconnection" -- Healing the link between sex & love
---"Shocking Beauty" -- The live character of Christ
---
---

Lecture scheduling and more info:
http://www.peterkreeft.com



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Customer Reviews

Some of the Psalms are very relevant as well.
matt
This is a book that will appeal to all Christians, Catholic or non-Catholic, and to all persons searching to understand the meaning of suffering.
Oswald Sobrino
He quotes C.S. Lewis in saying, "God whisphers in our pleasures but shout in our pain. Pain is His megaphone to rouse a dulled world."
Charles E. Greer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

100 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Oswald Sobrino on October 6, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Peter Kreeft has written an intellectually stimulating book on something we all have to face: suffering. He does so by giving us clues from philosophy, the arts, and the Bible to the meaning of suffering. As a Catholic Christian, Kreeft finds the ultimate meaning of suffering in the life, death, and resurrection of Christ. It is a book worth reading and re-reading. In my view, his most striking insight is how in literature, including the biblical story of Job, the protagonist must undergo suffering before the final triumph of good over evil. He urges us to view ourselves as protagonists in the midst of our own life stories. If good finally triumphs, as Christians believe, then the story is worthwhile, even with its inevitable suffering. Like a true philosopher, he also includes a thought-provoking chapter on why modernity can't understand suffering. This is a book that will appeal to all Christians, Catholic or non-Catholic, and to all persons searching to understand the meaning of suffering.
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77 of 79 people found the following review helpful By K. Eames on May 9, 2000
Format: Paperback
Peter Kreeft has done a masterful job of creating a readable work that can both address the confounding issue of God and suffering, and at the same time bring comfort to a wounded believing heart. Though rightfully indebted to C. S. Lewis, Kreeft brings a philosopher's precision to this topic, which differs from Lewis's more popular, though no less effective, approach. Moreover, there are times when Kreeft's prose is crafted so well, it can make the reader want to stand up and cheer - which can be awkward in public places. I have purchased multiple copies of this book to replace ones I've given to others. This is the book for the broken-hearted contemplative who seeks to make meaning out of his or her sorrow and better understand God's role in their pain. I am grateful to Dr. Kreeft for the comfort he has delivered through this compassionate and intellectually honest book. I recommend it unreservedly.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
Kreeft's best asset is that he has read the right books. His task in this tome is to tackle the giant question that looms over our modern era: Why do we suffer? If you are willing to wait for an answer, you'll probably believe it. A reader might grow impatient because Kreeft does what modern philosophers are reluctant to do--or don't believe they can do--which is to state absolutes. We are never totally happy, for example. Who is patient enough to really consider that anymore? It is our right as an American! But Kreeft will lure you away with a colloquial style and wise exhortation. He brings with him the wisdom of many ages: Socrates, to Jesus, to C.S. Lewis. Kreeft is best at exposing the fallacious thinking that guides our popular mindset. Once that thinking is cracked, Kreeft fills those flaws with the universe's strongest glue: the love of God. This is a compelling work, one that can be read during a moment of grief, and should certainly be read after. This book would have received a 10, but I admit (and Kreeft probably would too) that C.S. Lewis' efforts in this area are better.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Donner C. S. Tan on July 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
I read Kreeft's Making Sense out of Suffering more than twenty years ago and since then have gone on to read quite a number of other books on the same thread. I must say that Kreeft's book stands as one of the best, if not the best concise one-volume popular work that brings together a variety of disciplines - novelists, poets, prophets, philosophers, scriptures - to bear on the age-old existential issue of suffering. The book carries with it the suspenseful quality of a who-dunnit, that makes it unput-downable once you embark on it. You keep racing and grasping forward as the answer gets better and better with each chapter till you come to see afresh the familiar face of the One, acquainted with sorrows and griefs and by whose stripes our wounds are healed. Kreeft is not only a wise man. He is an empathetic conversational partner. What begins as a book that engages the intellect ends with words that touch the heart deeply. It is one of those books I count in my now sizeable collection as one that has left in me a deep imprint of truths that has pointed me and keeps pointing me to the Saviour. Thank you, Professor Kreeft!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "mikolajm" on May 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
I would like to strongly recommend this book to all. It handles the hard question in a very sober and inspiring way and even humorously :-). Kreeft has not the role of an excathedral theologian or philosopher. No, he is a philosopher in the true sense. Majeneutics, the Socratic method of philosophical dialogue, is mixed with reflexions. The author points out and by hints lets the reader find the answer. He is a seeker, voyager and a challenger like we all. Like any good voyager he has his common sense and lot of experience as compass and ofcourse lot of professional knowledge and wisdom. Thouse of us who luck it or can not structure our life-experiences should read this humble and beautifull creation of a genius. Suffering makes sense. AMDG
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Penni L. Smith on March 12, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Eschewing easy answers, Peter Kreeft calls us to explore the mystery of suffering. Examining the thoughts of philosophers, artists, and prophets, he shares clues to the why of suffering. This culminates in Jesus, "the one who would solve the problem of suffering by suffering, who would solve the problem of death by dying, and in so doing transform the meaning of suffering and death."

People of our day think feeling good is the ultimate objective, and therefore see suffering as an incredibly bad thing. But when you realize the ultimate objective is the glory of God, suffering is truly a momentary light affliction. Peter Kreeft helps us understand that.
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