Malaria and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $50.00
  • Save: $5.00 (10%)
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Malaria: Poverty, Race, and Public Health in the United States Hardcover – September 25, 2001


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$45.00
$31.37 $20.22
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014

Frequently Bought Together

Malaria: Poverty, Race, and Public Health in the United States + An Introduction to the Geography of Health
Price for both: $97.20

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (September 25, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801866375
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801866371
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,833,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is a fresh (and plausible) explanation for the disappearance of another southern germ of laziness, and it is presented in a study that does a fine job of packaging its findings within a richly documented historical context.

(Kenneth F. Kiple Journal of Southern History)

Margaret Humphrey's monograph on malaria in America has a strong storyline and a well-articulated thesis. It combines modern knowledge of malaria transmission and the genetic basis of resistance with a sound appreciation of the social, geographical and cultural nuances of the disease in American history.

(W.F. Bynum Times Literary Supplement)

A fascinating story of the spread of malaria through the USA following its introduction in the 17th century, through its greatest geographical coverage in the 19th century.

(Allan Saul Nature Medicine)

The main purpose of this book is to carry out an in-depth dialogue on the mystery of malaria and its existence in some parts of the world and disappearance in another based on the historical facts... The insight that [this] history provides has enormous value for global health.

(Doody's Health Sciences Review)

[ Malaria] is a masterpiece and is recommended reading for anyone involved in or interested in health care.

(Ronald C.HamdyMDFRCPFACP Southern Medical Journal)

A complex and fascinating story of the social history of malaria.

(Elizabeth Fee American Historical Review)

Gracefully written, perceptive, and well-documented, it will make historians of medicine, public health, and the social history of the American South grateful for her efforts.

(Medical History)

The lack of jargon makes the book accessible to a wide audience.

(Leo B. Slater, PhD Journal of the History of Medicine)

Accessible to a wide audience. A great breadth and depth of research underpins each chapter.

(Leo B. Slater Journal of the History of Medicine)

Humphreys, trained both as a physician and a historian, is uniquely qualified to tell the story of malaria in the United States. She uses her medical knowledge and her understanding of the social history of the United States, particularly of the South, to reveal malaria's previously unexplored American career. It is a story containing some unexpected twists that Humphreys reveals with thoughtfulness, elegance, and wit. She allows readers to see malaria's history from the various perspectives of physicians, patients, communities, and public health workers.

(Todd L. Savitt, Ph.D., Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University)

Margaret Humphrey's eminently readable and convincing history of malaria in the United States follows in the tradition of Erwin H. Ackerknecht's classic study, completing the story that work began by describing malaria's last stand in the southeastern United States and by carefully analyzing the factors which let to its final demise. More than an exercise in historical epidemiology, this book offers fascinating insights into scientific and popular ideas concerning disease and healing.

(Randall M. Packard, Department of History, Emory University)

From the Publisher

"Humphreys, trained both as a physician and a historian, is uniquely qualified to tell the story of malaria in the United States. She uses her medical knowledge and her understanding of the social history of the United States, particularly of the South, to reveal malaria's previously unexplored American career. It is a story containing some unexpected twists that Humphreys reveals with thoughtfulness, elegance, and wit. She allows readers to see malaria's history from the various perspectives of physicians, patients, communities, and public health workers."—Todd L. Savitt, Ph.D., Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University

"Margaret Humphrey's eminently readable and convincing history of malaria in the United States follows in the tradition of Erwin H. Ackerknecht's classic study, completing the story that work began by describing malaria's last stand in the southeastern United States and by carefully analyzing the factors which let to its final demise. More than an exercise in historical epidemiology, this book offers fascinating insights into scientific and popular ideas concerning disease and healing." —Randall M. Packard, Department of History, Emory University


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Harry Eagar VINE VOICE on March 8, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
MALARIA: Poverty, Race, and Public Health in the United States, by Margaret Humphreys. 196 pages, illustrated. Johns Hopkins

In “Yellow Fever and the South,” Margaret Humphreys showed how generations of local efforts failed to stop the scourge, but the disease fell immediately to a centralized attack; in fact, the disease in effect created a national public health service. That was in 1905.

In “Malaria,” we find that a similar approach did not work. In fact, although malaria disappeared, the disease won. It was not eliminated; rather it eliminated its necessary hosts (us) by chasing us away.

The American South was marginal territory for malaria anyway. More than half a century after malaria disappeared from the South, it remains unconquered in Africa, south Asia and some other places.

Humphreys, a physician, historian and Southerner, writes with skill, sympathy and candor. She is not afraid to call on her family’s experiences in the Tennessee Valley to illumine her subject. And she packs a lot of information in a few pages.

One factoid not in the book, but helpful in understanding the problem, is that when young Abe Lincoln was lawyering in Illinois, malaria was the leading cause of death there. It retreated for a variety of reasons.

Humphreys argues that malaria is not a disease of poverty but of location. Not a disease of a particular class or ethnic background, but universal, although some groups have some resistance: Afro-Americans are almost immune to the vivax type, which was the most widely spread in the United States. Yet by the 20th century blacks were the principal sufferers, and from the most awful type, falciparum.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again