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Man After Man: An Anthropology of the Future Hardcover – September, 1990

ISBN-13: 978-0312035600 ISBN-10: 0312035608 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: St Martins Pr; 1st edition (September 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312035608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312035600
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #258,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

It was like something coming from a dream of the future of humans!
JMM
The short accounts of us are given in a first person fashion, departing from his other works but I didn't find them to be hard to follow.
Zekeriyah
It took me forever to find this book because it's now out of print.
Rashna Elavia{dijitalboy@earthlink.net}

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Zekeriyah VINE VOICE on January 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
I must admit that I'm somehwat surprised by the controversy surrounding this book. It certainly isn't as good as his other works (the New Dinosaurs, After Man and the Future is Wild) but it certainly isn't a terrible book either. It seems that most people dislike it either because it leans so heavily towards sci-fi/paranormal (mainly via psychic powers and genetic engineering) or because it degrades humankind. Honestly, if you have no problem with sci-fi influences or with a pessimistic attitude towards human nature then you probably won't be too offended by this book.
Like all of Dougal Dixon's books, it starts out with a brief history of homo sapiens and our ancestors. The short accounts of us are given in a first person fashion, departing from his other works but I didn't find them to be hard to follow. He then gives an evolutionary chart for the various species in his book. The book then starts two hundred years in the future, as a rift develops between the upper and lower class humans, and the genetically modified servants. Another century later, their descendants are examined. Then it jumps ahead to 500 years from present, when genetically modified humans are created to repopulate the earth (from which most large animals have been exterminated) and upper class humans are kept alive through machines, while lower class humans resort to communal agriculturalism. Another five hundred years and we come upon an earth on the brink of disaster, as both the high-tech mechanical societies and agricultural communities fail while the genetically modified humans in the wilderness survive.
The book keeps going showing the various twists and turns taken by the genetically modified humans, as they evolve into strange new organisms.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 2001
Format: Hardcover
First of all, Dixon created his book by using Wayne Barlowes idea for a similar book. Read The Alien Life of Wayne Barlowe and you will know what I mean. Dixon managed to include imaginative text, but lacked interesting looking post-humans, some looking embarassingly stupid. To say it nicely, Philip Hood was not the right illustrator for this book. It's the only field guide type book I have found on the future of mankind, so if you wanted a book of this subject you might find it entertaining, but if you want great artwork look elsewere. If it helps, the book is not centered on very futuristic post-humans, but ones engineered to repopulate the earth in an animalistic style. There are a few technologically advanced humans at the beginning and end, but are far outnumbered by the "natural" ones. As a final note, I think the book would have been far superior to what it is now if it had been left in Barlowes hands.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rashna Elavia{dijitalboy@earthlink.net} on February 6, 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book is a perfect marriage of art and science. It isn't like a typical 'textbook' science book at all. It's about how Man, using accelerated genetical engineering, could evolve in the future. We follow such specimens as 'The Hitek' who live in mechanical cradles because their bodies cannot withstand the elements of future Earth, to the Plain Dwellers, Aquamorphs, Vacumorphs etc. We follow our trails from genetically altered humans 50 years into the future all the way to the resulting generations as far as 50 million years ahead. An incredibly visually stimulating book, {the illustrations are wonderful} it also makes you wonder seriously what could lie in the future of 'Man' as a humanoid species, long after we, ourselves are gone. It took me forever to find this book because it's now out of print. If you're interested in the idea of future rather than traditional anthropolgy and you do happen to come across this book, Buy it!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael Valdivielso on August 22, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Being a lover of history, Man After Man, really is something I enjoyed. It is about the changing face of mankind and future history, something I enjoy very much. Many people complain that timeline and stories seemed confusing and that the artwork is not that great. First off, I didn't find them at all confusing and the artwork was there to help the reader picture the beings that mankind have become NOT to win any awards or prizes. Don't compare the book to others, just enjoy it. It is NOT a serious piece of work.
I do wish it had been longer and had touched a little more on the changes to the other animals and the plantlife. It would of padded out the book more. I wanted more details!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E. Botsford on November 29, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is definitely NOT Dixon's shining work...unlike After Man and The New Dinosaurs, the artwork AND story are seriously lacking here. Many of the drawings look just plain stupid, especially the mutated and engineered post-human species. Its as if Dixon took about 1/4 of the time he spent with the other books to crank out the illustrations for this one. The text that accompanies the illustrations is disjointed and doesnt make sense on the first read through. Each of the text sections is written from the point of view of one of the post-human individuals. Unfortunately, most of them sound like they were written by a 4th grader and do little to explain this fascinating new world. Dixon would have been wiser to stick to the field guide style for this outing as well. After i read this one a couple of times I began to see what he was getting at, but I still wasnt won over.
I love the concept behind this book and have loved Dixons other alternate future books, but overall the poor quality of most of the illustrations and the hokey text make this one a non-recommendation.
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