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Man-Eaters Of Kumaon Hardcover – 1947


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Readers Union; First Edition edition (1947)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: 0975105205
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (159 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

This book is about man-eating tigers in India and the man who hunted them.
daniel smith
When you are reading this book, he makes you feel like you are there alongside him.
Clint W. Cypert
He writes his stories in a flowing, descriptive style that is very easy to read.
Bernie Gaynor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By M. Larsen on August 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
It's refreshing to read the memoirs of someone who was so famous yet so humble. He killed more than a dozen of the worst man-eating leopards and tigers in India in the early part of last century but never beats his chest or commits an unethical act. He was a true hunter and outdoorsman of the highest order and his stories reflect that.
You won't get any fluff or exaggeration with Jim Corbett. He was the REAL DEAL and his chess matches against these infamous man-eaters are legendary. From the 50 mile roadmarches to the 2 day stakeouts to the high suspense tracking of wounded killers, this man was tough as nails.
This book is one of his best and a must for any hunting/adventure collection.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By "bcj222" on April 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Jim Corbett was one of eight children of a colonial postmaster stationed in the foothills of the Himalaya in India. He was born in 1875 and started hunting when he was eight years old. Between 1907 and 1938, he hunted a number of "man eating" tigers and leopards-including the Champawat Man Eater, which was responsible for over 400 deaths, and the the Rudraprayag Leopard, which was rumored to have been responsible for over 125 deaths. When a new man eater began to wreak havoc, the village people called on "Carpet Sahib" for help. In this book, which was first published in 1944, Corbett tells ten exciting and enlightening stories that keep the reader turning pages to see how they turn out. Sometimes the reader begins to wonder whether Corbett will get the tiger or the tiger will get him. Listen to Corbett tell of his meeting with the Chowgarh Tigress who killed at least 64 people and maybe twice that...
"As I stepped clear of the giant slate, I looked behind me over my right shoulder and--looked straight into the tigress' face. I would like you to have a clear picture of the situation. Her fore paws were stretched out and her hind legs were well tucked under her. Her head, which was raised a few inches off her paws, was eight feet from me. On her face was a smile, similar to that one sees on the face of a dog welcoming his master home after a long absence."

Along the way through his stories, Corbett displays amazing understanding of jungle lore and insights into the animal that probably most deserves the title "King of Beasts." He also explains what causes his prey to begin preying on people. Corbett obviously admired his quarry and considered the "tiger a gentleman.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By neurotome on March 7, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A lot of tigers and leopards die in this book. If you belong to PETA, then, this isn't the book for you. Jim Corbett begins with the premise that tigers and leopards who kill humans must be killed.

But he then begins his exposition with the story of the Champawat man-eating tigress, and how he first undertook to hunt such a beast. As I followed him into the jungle, I couldn't help but marvel at his recounting of his fear, his missteps, his eventual triumph.

But what I loved most of all was his keen eye for detail. Corbett isn't satisfied to say, "I shot the man-eater;" he must explain why that tiger's old paw injury forced her to substitute humans for her natural prey. And as you go on in the book, you begin to sense that Corbett is not a hunter who kills to bolster an inadequate ego; rather, his great joy springs from his natural affinity and long years of association with tigers, leopards, and the other denizens of the jungle.

It's probably worth knowing that in his later years, as the wilds of India became overrun with people, he turned to photo safaris; he wished to share his experiences of viewing these animals in their native habitat with the entire world, without doing any harm. If you, then, can sympathize with such a perspective, I wholly recommend this book; you'll come away with a new fascination with the great creatures we share our planet with.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By daniel smith on November 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is about man-eating tigers in India and the man who hunted them. Jim Corbett was born in India, the son of a British colonial postmaster in the foothills of the Himalayas. As a boy, Corbett spent most of his time wandering in the jungle, and became not only an expert on tigers, but on all of the jungle animals and birds.When there was a man-eating tiger about, the government officials would always ask Corbett to track down and kill the man-eater (The tigers had HUNDREDS of victims!). It was a very dangerous business, and Corbett was almost killed many times. He would sit up all night over a human kill, waiting for the man-eater to come back. This book is a very suspenseful, exciting page-turner and a bloody good read!--Daniel Smith, 5th grade homeschooler
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 22, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I had read and heard of ahimsa (loosely translated as non-violence) as preached and practised by Gandhi. I am also familiar with the much wider concept of ahimsa one finds in Hindu philosophy : a state of mind where you cease to differentiate your self from any other being. I had also read about yogis and mystics who had actually reached such a state of mind. Vedanta textbooks say that knowledge (of the ultimate reality) drives away fear. But in all these readings I was only vaguely aware of the inherent link between ahimsa and fearlessness until I chanced upon "Man-Eaters of Kumaon". How does Corbett overcome fear? Is it just a matter of cold reason? Is it just his intimate knowledge of the terrain, the knowledge of the ways of man eaters, his ability to understand and imitate the language of most of the animals that were to be found in Kumaon ? As a ten year old boy he had his first trophy when he first wounded and then stalked and finished off a full grown leopard. As a middle aged man, during an epidemic outbreak of cholera in Mokamah, where he worked as a railway contractor, he nursed back to life a cholera victim left abandoned by fellow travellers. His deep sympathy and love for those simple folk among whom he lived and worked is inseparable from the courage he showed when called upon to stand by them; one feeds on the other. These Kumaon stories are replete with instances where the victim's own folk had panicked on seeing (or even sensing) a man-eater , leaving the poor victim alone. In one instance a villager simply shut his door when he received no reply from his wife who had, a little while earlier, stepped out of her hut to relieve herself. Ironically enough most of the victims of the Kumaon "man-eaters" happened to be women.Read more ›
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