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A Man of Glass & All the Ways We have Failed Paperback – March 14, 2011


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Editorial Reviews

Review

J. A. Tyler's second novel, A Man of Glass & All The Ways We Have Failed, is a different kind of storytelling. It breaks all rules of traditional plot and narrative, and instead relies on its staggering language and imagery to move the reader steadily from one page to the next. Call it prose, call it a poem, call it a mirage, if it seems necessary. It isn't. It's the emotion that matters, the description, the different elements in the earth that they both become as a result.
--Amanda Kimmerly, Fringe Magazine

Seriously one of the coolest prose books I've read in a long long time.
--Tyler Gobble, Vouched Books

Reading this novella is an experience in itself - one that requires wrapping your head around these images and trying to find meaning while waiting for the snippets of information in-between. Descriptive language expresses the longing and heartache dominates the piece. Repetition and interplay of words make for beautiful passages.
--Megan Mowry, The Hipster Book Club

Everything about this thing is just a little different than we thought things could be. And so it's difficult to define: it's difficult to want to define it. This is like a Miranda July film. It's like finding a grocery list with all the things you needed. It's like old home movies on a projector; with people you didn't know you were related to, having nothing but good times. This is like a circle. This makes you think about words: individual words. It makes you say them out loud until they don't mean what you thought they meant.
--Micah Ling, Book Punch

A Man Of Glass & All The Ways We Have Failed is a beautifully-woven narrative which understands and utilizes the effects that minimalism has on a reader. Beyond this, the novel is fueled in such a way that is often underrated and largely unseen, and demonstrates the power of such subtleties as figurative language, structure, as well as a truly talented writer. After it has been stripped bare, the novel is left naked, exposed, unhindered, beautiful.
--T. D. Fields, Feed

J.A. Tyler's A Man Of Glass & All The Ways We Have Failed is filled with haunting and elegant prose, full of imagery that appeals to all senses. Each word, each line, is packed with energy, and there is this epic tension that forms from sentence to sentence:

"Glass crumbles and her hair dries, her body dries, and the towels go up on the rack and the boat it goes back in her head, the last drips running down her ankles. A captain and his sword, the words she doesn't hear."

The work is powerful in its silence, meaning there isn't any forced language, but rather the fluidity of diction magnifies each poetic scene. --Shome Dasgupta, Laughing Yeti

About the Author

J. A. Tyler's debut novel(la) Inconceivable Wilson was released in late 2009 and was followed in 2010 by this sophomore release: A Man of Glass & All the Ways We Have Failed. Published by Fugue State Press - the same brilliant indie publisher who brought the world Noah Cicero's The Human War, Joshua Cohen's Cadenza for the Schneidermann Violin Concerto, and Shane Jones's The Failure Six - this new novel(la) is at once a love poem and a eulogy, a shriek of pain and a whimper of realization, a lusting and a relinquishing.

More About the Author

Born in 1978 and currently residing in Colorado, J. A. Tyler's work has appeared in Black Warrior Review, Redivider, Cream City Review, Diagram, Fairy Tale Review, Columbia Poetry Review, and New York Tyrant and has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and cited in Dzanc Books's Best of the Web series, Wake Forest's &Now series, Wigleaf's Top 50 Very Short Fictions, and the StorySouth Million Writers Award.

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