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Man and the Mediterranean Forest: A History of Resource Depletion Hardcover – October 1, 1981

ISBN-13: 978-0126872507 ISBN-10: 0126872503 Edition: 1St Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 194 pages
  • Publisher: Academic Pr; 1St Edition edition (October 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0126872503
  • ISBN-13: 978-0126872507
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,233,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Arly Allen on December 17, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is a classic. The author is a professional forester who has done extensive fieldwork in Cyprus. He is also a fine historian with a knowledge of ancient and modern literature on the Mediterranean basin. This is a scholarly book of less than 200 pages that is well written and easily enjoyed by the layman.
10,000 years ago the Mediterranean Basin, from the Atlantic ocean to the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers was covered by vast forests. To the North, the forests extended to the retreating glaciers in Scandinavia. To the South, they extended from the seashore deep into what is now the Sahara Desert. In the East,deep forests of giant trees spread from the sea coast of Israel north through Lebanon and Syria into Turkey and then down into Iraq.The climate was temperate, the rivers ran clear all year long, and the soil was fertile.
The original inhabitants were hunters and gatherers, and for them the forests were both a challenge and a rich source of food. With the coming of agriculture, however, the forests became the adversary: Quid est agricola, silvae adversarius. Agriculture required clearing the forests for fields. As population increased, villages were built using wood. From these grew towns and then cities. And as these grew the forest was cut for fields, for timber and for firewood. Civilization and deforestation grew together.
Thirgood shows how civilization and deforestation were symbiotically linked. The forests supplied wood for cooking, for heat and for building. Wood became the prime strategic resource for the cities and kingdoms that grew from them. Timber was necessary for the building of ships, which made possible long-distance trade. But wood was also the prime fuel, necessary for the making of pottery and metalsmithing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Arly Allen on December 17, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is a classic. The author is a professional forester who has done extensive fieldwork in Cyprus. He is also a fine historian with a knowledge of ancient and modern literature on the Mediterranean basin. This is a scholarly book of less than 200 pages that is well written and easily enjoyed by the layman.
10,000 years ago the Mediterranean Basin, from the Atlantic ocean to the Euphrates and Tigris Rivers was covered by vast forests. To the North, the forests extended to the retreating glaciers in Scandinavia. To the South, they extended from the seashore deep into what is now the Sahara Desert. In the East,deep forests of giant trees spread from the sea coast of Israel north through Lebanon and Syria into Turkey and then down into Iraq.The climate was temperate, the rivers ran clear all year long, and the soil was fertile.
The original inhabitants were hunters and gatherers, and for them the forests were both a challenge and a rich source of food. With the coming of agriculture, however, the forests became the adversary: Quid est agricola, silva adversarius. Agriculture required clearing the forests for fields. As population increased, villages were built using wood. From these grew towns and then cities. And as these grew the forest was cut for fields, for timber and for firewood. Civilization and deforestation grew together.
Thirgood shows how civilization and deforestation were symbiotically linked. The forests supplied wood for cooking, for heat and for building. Wood became the prime strategic resource for the cities and kingdoms that grew from them. Timber was necessary for the building of ships, which made possible long-distance trade. But wood was also the prime fuel, necessary for the making of pottery and metalsmithing.
Read more ›
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