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Man and Woman, One in Christ: An Exegetical and Theological Study of Paul's Letters Paperback – November 21, 2009


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Man and Woman, One in Christ: An Exegetical and Theological Study of Paul's Letters + Discovering Biblical Equality: Complementarity Without Hierarchy
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; 1 edition (November 21, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310219884
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310219880
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.9 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #217,497 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Philip Payne’s work has always been characterized by careful, detailed exegetical study of the biblical text. In Man and Woman, One in Christ, Payne brings decades of meticulous research to its proper culmination in a compelling and thoroughly biblical demonstration that Paul the apostle to the Gentiles was a wholehearted supporter of women serving in any and all sorts of ministerial roles they are called and gifted to undertake. Indeed, he demonstrates at length that Paul should no longer be seen as the “party of no” when it comes to women in ministry or their equality in Christian marriage. This book deserves the highest commendation.” -- Dr. Ben Witherington III

About the Author

Philip Barton Payne (PhD, Cambridge) has served with his wife Nancy for the Evangelical Free Church Mission in Japan for seven years. He has taught New Testament studies at Cambridge, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Gordon-Conwell, Bethel, and Fuller, and is known for his studies on textual criticism, the parables of Jesus, and Paul's teachings on women.

More About the Author

Philip Barton Payne has served with his wife Nancy in Japan for seven years with the Evangelical Free Church, where they ministered to students in the Kyoto Christian Studies Center and lectured about the New Testament in various Japanese Seminaries. He has taught New Testament studies at Cambridge, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Gordon-Conwell, Bethel, and Fuller, and is known for his studies on New Testament Textual Criticism, the Parables of Jesus, and Paul's teachings on women.

He is also the founder and president of Linguist's Software, Inc. He founded Linguist's Software in 1984 in response to requests for the Greek, Hebrew, and Japanese fonts he had created for use in his studies and ministry. Linguistsoftware.com now sells fonts and keyboard software for more than 2000 languages, including the fonts being used to produce the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum, the United Bible Societies' The Greek New Testament, the Oxford Hebrew Bible, and the Koehler-Baumgartner multi-volume Hebrew Lexicon. Phil and Nancy have three children David, Kimiko, and Brendan.

Academic Qualifications

*B.S. (Biology, Pre-Med) Magna Cum Laude, Wheaton College, 1969
*M.A. (New Testament Studies) Summa Cum Laude, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1972
*M.Div. Summa Cum Laude, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1973
*New Testament Studies under Martin Hengel and Peter Stuhlmacher, Tübingen University, 1973, 1974
*Ph.D. New Testament Studies under J.P.M. Sweet and C.F.D. Moule, Cambridge University, 1976

New Testament Teaching Positions

*Cambridge University Colleges: Supervisor of New Testament Studies 1974-1975
*Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1976
*Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, 1984-1987
*Bethel Theological Seminary, 1986
*Fuller Theological Seminary Northwest, 1988-

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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I highly recommend this marvellous book.
Shirley L. Barron
After a long, passionate discussion, I must say that Payne has finally persuaded me in the end that these verses could very well have been interpolated.
Dr. Marc Axelrod
If you think you know what the Bible says on gender but have not read this book, I strongly encourage you to read it.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Paul D. Adams on February 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Whether or not readers align with Payne's conclusions, his research is comprehensive and fair-handed. Anyone who takes seriously the teachings about women in ministry and the Word of God will find here a biblically faithful, historical responsible, and culturally insightful defense of evangelical egalitarianism. To ignore Payne's research is to miss some of the most important findings to date on a topic that continues to divide Christianity in North America. I very much appreciate the author's commitment to all the relevant biblical data. While he shows appreciation for the cultural and social backgrounds surrounding the Pauline corpus, Payne does not "foreground" them unnecessarily such that they eclipse God's holy Word. His high regard for Scripture is evident on every page and he plainly states his full belief in inerrancy of Scripture. Moreover, he takes on the loudest voices from the other side (Wayne Grudem, Douglas Moo, Andreas Köstenberger, et al.) and graciously engages them without compromising his findings. Quite simply this is the best treatment today.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marc Axelrod VINE VOICE on September 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a strong scriptural look at the unity of women and men in Christ according to Paul's writings. Dr. Payne wrote this for the Evangelical Free Church so that they would reconsider their stand of not ordaining women. He cogently argues from Galatians 3:26-29, 1 Corinthians 12:12, Colossians 3:11, and elsewhere that Paul's uniform vision is Jew and Gentile, man and woman, slave and free, united and equal in Christ. No problem there.

Dr. Payne goes on to expound some controverted texts in 1 Corinthians. He argues at length that wherever the word kephale (Head) shows up in 1 Corinthians 11:1-10, we should interpret this to mean source rather than leader or authority. Therefore, Paul is not saying that the leader of every man is Christ, and the leader of the woman is man, he is saying that the source of every man is Christ, and the source of the woman is man, and the source of Christ is God. He gives parallels in ancient literature, but the argument is strained. The head covering debate is really a hair covering issue rather than a hat covering issue according to Payne, and this may be right. He also shows from 1 Corinthians 11:5 that both women and men can pray and prophesy in church.

Payne then goes into 1 Corinthians 14 and gives a painstaking, 42 page deliberation on why verses 34-35 were interpolated into the text centuries later. He argues forcefully for this, because he knows if Paul really did say that women are to be silent and submissive in the churches at all times, this shoots down Payne's position that women can pray and preach and lead in church.

Payne shows that these verses were not quoted in the first couple of centuries of the church, and when they show in later texts, they are not always in the same place.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Shirley L. Barron on January 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
Philip Payne's new book is an extraordinarily well-done study of Paul's letters, in the area of women's roles in the church. Payne has studied this subject in detail for several decades. His knowledge of the 1st century AD background, of New Testament Greek, of textual criticism, and of the theological issues is extensive. His viewpoint is thoroughly evangelical. He zeroes in on several controversial passages in Galatians, I Corinthians, Ephesians, and I Timothy. He shows convincingly that Paul desired that all social groups be equal in status and potential role in the early church: Gentiles as well as Jews, slaves as well as masters, AND women as well as men. His tone is irenic, although he often quotes the views of those who believe in hierarchy and/or patriarchy. He shows how careful exegesis refutes the views of those who believe that women must remain in non-leadership roles in the church. His discussion of I Corinthians 14:34-35 is outstanding, demonstrating that these two verses are almost certainly an interpolation that came into the NT text a few generations after Paul wrote his original letter. Regarding the 1st letter to Timothy, Payne discusses the fact that there are NO masculine pronouns in Paul's lists of requirements for overseer, elder, or deacon roles that would limit these roles to males, showing rather that "anyone" or "whoever" fits the characteristics (such as trustworthy, hospitable, gentle, being above reproach, etc.) could aspire to one of these roles, which is said to be a "noble task."
Dr. Payne originally started his studies of these passages from an adversarial viewpoint, attempting to prove the hierarchical stance, but after prolonged study found that he must come to opposite conclusions. I highly recommend this marvellous book. It does require close attention in reading but is worth the effort. Definitely five stars.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By George P. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 3, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In feminist criticism of Christianity, the apostle Paul often emerges as chief among sexists. He subordinated wives to husbands in the home and women to men in the church, enjoining females to be “submissive” to and “quiet” before males. Sometimes, it is conceded, Paul made noises in an egalitarian direction, e.g., Galatians 3:28. On the whole, however, he advocated patriarchy, or as contemporary advocates call it, complementarianism.

In Man and Woman, One in Christ, Philip B. Payne argues that Paul has been misread. Far from being an advocate of patriarchy—in home or church—Paul is an egalitarian. Or rather, to state the matter positively: “Paul repeatedly affirms the equal standing and privileges of women and men in the church and in marriage.”

Payne reaches this conclusion through

• an examination of the Hellenistic, rabbinic, Old Testament, and early Christian backgrounds to Paul’s teaching (chapter 1);
• a survey of women Paul names as ministry leaders (chapter 2);
• an outline of Pauline theological axioms that imply sexual equality (chapter 3);
• and a painstaking exegesis of the relevant Pauline texts: Galatians 3:28 (chapter 4); 1 Corinthians 7 (chapter 5); 11:2–16 (chapters 6–13); 14:34–35 (chapter 14); Ephesians 5:21–33 and Colossians 3:18–19 (chapter 15); 1 Timothy 2:8–15 (chapters 16–23); and 1 Timothy 3:1–13 and Titus 1:5–9).

Some of the arguments Payne makes will be familiar to anyone who has kept up with the literary debate between egalitarians and complementarians, which has been ongoing among evangelicals for several decades. Indeed, Payne’s own scholarly output on the topic has made a signal contribution to these debates. He states that Man and Woman, One in Christ has been 36 years in the making.
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