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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW
This is the book on how to make a business WORK! I am president of a small company and immediately took the ideas and practices out of this book and applied them to great success. This is not a quick read, and every item will not pertain to each individual person, but the observations presented explained a huge number of obstacles I was facing. If you are trying to...
Published on March 6, 2002 by Amazon Customer

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad quality printing
The printing is terrible, most of pages are very light, out of ink, very difficutl to read!

Is it possible to replace with the better printing quality book?
Published 4 months ago by xiaowei meng


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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, March 6, 2002
By 
Amazon Customer (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
This is the book on how to make a business WORK! I am president of a small company and immediately took the ideas and practices out of this book and applied them to great success. This is not a quick read, and every item will not pertain to each individual person, but the observations presented explained a huge number of obstacles I was facing. If you are trying to manage any form of modern organization, buy this book and spend the time reading it. It made me a huge Drucker fan.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than worth the price, July 15, 2008
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
I had originally rented this book from the library with an intention of zipping through it to obtain a general idea and feel for the concepts presented. I found myself constantly stopping to take notes and unable to finish the entire book during the loan period. After renewing twice and hardly making it a quarter of the way through I decided I would have to purchase the book.

As the General Manager of a small business with no formal training and little prior experience in managing a company this was the best investment I could have ever made. I'd recommend you take notes as you read in order to get the most of this book. Read it a second time a year after you finish it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars insightful, practical and still relevant 35 years after being published, November 2, 2008
Domain specific know-how is obviously essential to effective management. In this book, Peter Drucker discusses non-domain-specific know-how for management. Even though the book is long at 861 pages, it is NOT wordy and he makes every sentence count.

Insightful, practical, straight-forward and meaningful (to me) discussion topics included job design, organizational design, growing and selecting managers, improving organizational productivity, strategy, and managing innovation.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars worth every penny and time spent, March 8, 2006
By 
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
this book is just great. i find it a straightforward and no frills book. yet reading it makes business interesting and encouraging. a truly indispensable reference and guide to management, better than any textbook i have come across in terms of giving clarity to the big picture. for that i have huge respect and admiration for peter drucker.

peter drucker is just "the man" in management in my book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The True Spirit of Management, September 10, 2010
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This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
A very practical book! I came across this in my first professional job after college in the Wall Street area in 1974. The officers in the Consulting Company, where I worked, used this pretty much as their Bible on running their business. We used to meet regularly as a staff and discuss Peter Drucker's ideas. Management wanted us to be versed in this stuff.

I personally latched onto his thinking. It made sense! It worked! I carried it with me to other companies on Wall Street as I grew into management positions, and later in the Management area of several computer manufacturer's Software Engineering Research and Design departments.

Drucker was famous for the whole concept of Management by Objectives (MBO). Besides being the "latest craze," it met with great success. It was a logical tool for businesses to plan their growth, future, operations and the management of their day-to-day business, departments, etc. This grew into what we know today as Strategic Planning.

This book still has tremendous value today. I have replaced my original hardcover copy twice. It has stood the test of time. I find that the most valuable chapter in this good-sized book has been Chapter 36, "The Spirit of Performance." That was a chapter which emphasized:
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To Make Common Men & Women Do Uncommon Things--The Test Is Performance, Not Good Feelings--Focus on Strength--Practices, Not Preachments--The Danger of Safe Mediocrity--What "Performance" Means--What to Do with the Non-performer--"Conscience" Decisions--Focus on Opportunity--"People" Decisions--The Control of an Organization--Integrity, the Touchstone.
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It basically encompassed the most essential things a manager had to know about managing, motivating and dealing with people. It spoke of things like responsibilities, accountability and fairness. It was extremely uplifting. For instance, it taught:
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The spirit of performance requires that there be full scope for individual excellence. The focus must be on the strengths of a man--on what he(/she) can do rather than on what he(/she) cannot do.

"Morale" in an organization does not mean that "people get along together"; the test is performance, not conformance. Human relations that are not grounded in the satisfaction of good performance in work are actually poor human relations and result in a mean spirit. And there is no greater indictment of an organization than that the strength and ability of the outstanding man(/woman) become a threat to the group and his performance a source of difficulty, frustration, and discouragement for the others.

Spirit of performance in a human organization means that its energy output is larger than the sum of the efforts put in. It means the creation of energy. This cannot be accomplished by mechanical means. A mechanical contrivance can, at its theoretical best, conserve energy, but it cannot create it. To get out more than is being put in is possible only in the moral sphere.

Morality does not mean preachments. Morality, to have any meaning at all, must be a principle of action. It must not be exhortation, sermon, or good intentions. It must be practices.
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Thirty-six years later, I still go back to this. I have had reason twice to go back to this just in the last few months. This and an essay, "A Man Subject to Authority." from a spiritual book, "Unprofitable Servants: Conferences on Humility," by Nivard Kinsella, O.S.C.O., were resources I kept close at hand and referred to frequently. Coming from two completely different sources they seemed to compliment each other very well. The essay began it with, "Humility is the most necessary of all the virtues. It is so at all times and for everyone. If it can be said to be more necessary for one than for another, that one is the person who is in authority." In a sense, it could have fit right into Drucker's chapter on "The Spirit of Performance." I think both were bordering on sort of a universal truth concerning dealings with people.

I think, even after retirement, I'll have a copy of both of these books, which open first to the above sections, in close proximity--never too far away! In fact, only a few months ago, I bought an audio copy of the book on CDs. I hope to listen to the whole thing sometime in the near future. Why? It always seems to spur me on. In writing this, I once again took a look at the end of Ch. 36. It does me good. We need more of this in our country. I'll share it with you here:
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This chapter has talked of "practices." It has not talked of "leadership." This was intentional. There is no substitute for leadership. But management cannot create leaders. It can only create the conditions under which potential leadership qualities become effective; or it can stifle potential leadership. The supply of leadership is much too uncertain to be depended upon for the creation of the spirit the enterprise needs to be productive and to hold together.

But practices, though seemingly humdrum, can always be practiced whatever a man's aptitudes, personality, or attitudes. They require no genius--only application. They are things to do rather than to talk about.

And the right practices should go a long way toward bringing out, recognizing, and using whatever potential for leadership there is in the management group. They should also lay the foundation for the right kind of leadership. For leadership is not magnetic personality--that can just as well be demagoguery. It is not "making friends and influencing people" that is flattery. Leadership is the lifting of a man's vision to higher sights, the raising of a man's performance to a higher standard, the building of a man's personality beyond its normal limitations. Nothing better prepares the ground for such leadership than a spirit of management that confirms in the day-to-day practices of the organization strict principles of conduct and responsibility, high standards of performance, and respect for the individual and his work.
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That's what makes this book great!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great from a Job and Organizational design standpoint, April 17, 2009
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
A very encouraging book. A long read, however extremely straight forward. Great from a job and organizational design standpoint. Great insight into "non-domain-specific know-how for management." Learn how to ask the right questions about your company. A must read for business.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A monumental treatise on management and its functions!!!, October 23, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
This book is only one of its kind! Written well over years ago, even today it is of utmost relevance to all businesses. Recently we have come across so many "management gurus" who propogate different theories which ordinary business managers cannot relate to. One is never sure what the assumptions have been in such studies, nor does one know the extent of their applicability to the ordinary business.
BUT WITH PETER DRUCKER, YOU ARE ALWAYS SURE!!!
Go for this book if you want to have a real insight into the challenges a company faces and the right questions to ask to overcome those. An absolute must read for anyone serious about business management!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic and necessary read for all leaders and managers, December 23, 2012
This review is from: Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices (Paperback)
Wisdom and time saving, performance increasing words just leak from the pages. I wish every first time manager would read and really absorb the words from the pages. As I read the book I thankfully realized that I have been doing many of the things Drucker recommends but it did make me think how valuable it would be if you consciously knew to perform the way Drucker advises. I work in a "knowledge worker" environment and his advice is priceless. I really enjoyed the advice that Drucker dispenses in "how to manage your manager". Again, if you knew these pearls of wisdom early in your career, the sky is the limit for you. In summary, a must read !!!!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, "if only"..., November 11, 2010
This book looks like it's going to make a nice doorstop. It's thick as someone's arm and written about a subject that most people-- including managers-- could seem to give a damn about. Management. What methods have been used, what is effective, and what is the social responsibility of a corporate entity.

Let's deal with that last one for a moment. Because this is the singular problem with this book. Drucker somehow makes the subject interesting, it is well researched, and there are many keen observations on psychology and society throughout, as well as the core subject. BUT, this book deals in a sort of pie-in-the-sky ideal of how corporations should be run. How managers should behave. And the reality, as the history of the US in the past 20 years has demonstrated, is anything but. He emphasizes the importance of profit not as a MOTIVE but as a MEANS. Do we see that anywhere in the boardrooms of major corporations, let alone the White House or floor of Congress? He emphasizes the importance of looking at the long view, and of maximizing the future of a company based on the reality of humans and human behavior, rather than trying to turn humans into robots. Do we see that in the sweat-shops in China pouring out our iPhones?

No. This makes this book a lot like watching the first four seasons of the West Wing: how we wish it would be, rather than how it is. But if you have the chance to change how management is approached, by all means read this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Drucker Delivers, July 12, 2014
By 
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As others have stated, this is a great management books. I was a Drucker fan before this book, but now I am fully committed to his teachings.
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Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices
Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices by Peter F. Drucker (Paperback - April 14, 1993)
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