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Managing Generation X: How to Bring Out the Best in Young Talent (Revised Edition) Paperback – August 17, 2000


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Managing Generation X: How to Bring Out the Best in Young Talent (Revised Edition) + Generations at Work: Managing the Clash of Boomers, Gen Xers, and Gen Yers in the Workplace
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Revised Edition edition (August 17, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393320758
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393320756
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #700,397 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This is an update of Tulgan's 1995 guide to the new workforce, which he compiled when he left a Wall Street law firm to start his own consulting firm. Relying on interviews with 100 Gen X workers, he attempted to debunk stereotypes about these latest entrants into the job market. Tulgan, himself a member of Generation X, found that these employees are not "slackers" but, rather, are flexible, technologically savvy, and self-confident. He disputes misconceptions that they have short attention spans, are disloyal, and are unwilling to defer gratification. He then recommends management strategies that will optimize their skills and traits. Over the last five years, Tulgan has interviewed thousands more Xers, and he has fine-tuned his original observations. In 1995, he had Xers growing up watching images of themselves on The Brady Bunch and Mork and Mindy. Now he identifies Ally McBeal as their cultural influence. But the biggest change, as Tulgan notes, is that many in this age group are now in positions of management themselves or that they may even run companies of their own. David Rouse
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

From the Author

A guide to managing rising young stars. Managing Generation X, my first book, is a guide to managing rising young stars in the workplace. In candid interviews, Generation Xers discuss their work experiences and identify effective and ineffective management styles. One of my goals in writing the book was to move beyond the pop-psychology surrounding Generation X and examine the deeper issues unique to Xers in the workplace. Thank you for your interest.--Bruce Tulgan , October 21, 1999.

More About the Author

Bruce Tulgan is internationally recognized as the leading expert on young people in the workplace and one of the leading experts on leadership and management. Bruce is a best-selling author, an adviser to business leaders all over the world, and a sought-after keynote speaker and management trainer.

Since 1995, Bruce has worked with tens of thousands of leaders and managers in hundreds of organizations ranging from Aetna to Wal-Mart; from the Army to the YMCA. He has been called "the new Tom Peters" by many who have seen him speak. In recent years, Bruce was named by Management Today as one of the few contemporary figures to stand out as a "management guru" and he was named to the 2009 Thinkers 50 rising star list (the Thinkers 50 is the definitive global ranking of the world's top 50 business thinkers). And on August 13, 2009, Bruce was honored to accept Toastmasters International's most prestigious honor, the Golden Gavel. This honor is annually presented to a single person who represents excellence in the fields of communication and leadership. Past winners have included Marcus Buckingham, Stephen Covey, Zig Ziglar, Deepak Chopra, Tony Robbins, Ken Blanchard, Tom Peters, Art Linkletter, Dr. Joyce Brothers, and Walter Cronkite.

Bruce's forthcoming book THE 27 CHALLENGES MANAGERS FACE: STEP-BY-STEP SOLUTIONS TO (NEARLY) ALL OF YOUR MANAGEMENT PROBLEMS (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2014) will be published in September. He is also the author of the best-seller IT'S OKAY TO BE THE BOSS (HarperCollins, 2007) and the classic MANAGING GENERATION X (W.W. Norton, 2000; first published in 1995). Bruce's other books include WINNING THE TALENT WARS (W.W. Norton, 2001), which received widespread acclaim from Fortune 500 CEOs and business journalists; the best-seller FAST FEEDBACK (HRD Press, 1998); NOT EVERYONE GETS A TROPHY: HOW TO MANAGE GENERATION Y (Jossey-Bass, 2009); MANAGING THE GENERATION MIX (HRD Press, 2006); and IT'S OKAY TO MANAGE YOUR BOSS (Jossey-Bass, 2010). Many of Bruce's works have been published around the world in foreign editions.

Bruce's writing appears regularly in human resources, staffing and management journals, including a regular column in TRAINING magazine called 'Sticky Notes' and a regular column in the Huffington Post. His writing has also appeared in dozens of magazines and newspapers such as the Harvard Business Review, BusinessWeek, HR Magazine, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and USA Today. As well, his work has been the subject of thousands of news stories around the world.

Before founding RainmakerThinking in 1993, Bruce practiced law at the Wall Street firm of Carter, Ledyard & Milburn. He graduated with high honors from Amherst College, received his law degree from the New York University School of Law, and is still a member of the Bar in Massachusetts and New York. Bruce continues his lifelong study of Okinawan Uechi Ryu Karate Do and holds a fifth degree black belt. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut with his wife Debby Applegate, Ph.D., who won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Biography for her book THE MOST FAMOUS MAN IN AMERICA: THE BIOGRAPHY OF HENRY WARD BEECHER (Doubleday, 2006).

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
It takes a recruiting and retention crisis to make businesses really wake up and take notice of Tulgan's commentary on the needs and expectations of Generation X. Of course every generation wants what they want--training in marketable skills, creative challenges, growing responsibility, performance-based compensation, timely rewards, etc.--but the difference is Xers negotiate for these things at the beginning of their careers-- not waiting around to climb some corporate ladder for five years before they get them.
Xers are challenging organizations to make the radical changes they've been dragging their feet on for the past 20 years.
Tulgan makes the case that the new fast-paced, global, techno-centered economy demands workers who are flexible, techno-savy, adaptable, entrepreneurial; people who are willing to reinvent themselves daily, jump from project to project, team to team. His star Xers are just those people.
As a management trainer, I'm meeting them and their bewildered managers every day. And it's clear that the dialogue between and among the generations is one of the healthiest--and hotest--topics around. Tulgan's book provides a springboard for a coversation that can only result in positive changes for everyone. Xers are "the workforce of the future," helping to define "the workplace of the future" for all of us.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
Tulgan's book is important because of what it stands for. It's not a call to arms, but a call for workers and managers to get together to consider what has changed about today's world of work and, in particular, the motivations and behaviors of younger workers.
Most, if not all, young readers in the workforce will relate to Tulgan's message and hope that more managers take the time to listen to Tulgan's argument. Older readers will either take note and better manage their younger troops, or they will defensively reject Tulgan's work because of its implication that they are doing something wrong.
It's fun to read about individual workers' real life experiences being "managed." As one who has been on both ends of the management relationship, the book reminds me that there is not one right way; rather, I must be flexible and think of different ways to motivate and retain employees. I don't have to decrease my demands of workers. If I get it right (with Tulgan's help), I can be a more demanding manager and get more out of workers in a mutually beneficial relationship. Check out Tulgan's concept of "fast feedback" and other motivational ideas. This stuff works!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mark DiNino on November 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
I am about as much of a GenXer as can possibly be being born in 1970. For my entire life I saw a great deal of things as "off key", such as the broken homes, the druggies, and being mistreated by many of the Boomers in the workplace. This book proved to me that it was not just my little world, but an actual issue. Bruce disarms the sterotypes of GenXers extremely well. This is a must read for anyone, Xer or Boomer, to successfully manage the most driven and innovative generation in American history.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Canoetripper on October 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have a habit of highlighting as I read, and this book has more yellow in it than any of my others! As an Xer (former military officer and now clergy), I saw myself on just about every page. Tulgan offers many excellent insights into the formation of our generation and how we are best approached. He also offers some truths that are true for GenX, but not necessarily unique to GenX. The first half of my book has more yellow in it than the last half, in which Tulgan begins to restate himself. Nevertheless, this book is worth the price of admission and is a must read for all managers.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
Excellent way of really getting to understand how Xers work and think. Reading Tulgan's book has inspired me to make changes in the work place and has changed my relationship with Xers in a very positive way. Thanks Tulgan!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
It's fantastic. The book captures the generation gap in the workplace in the nineties and captures the mindset of my generation better than any book or article I've ever read. Read it.
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