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Managing the Older Worker: How to Prepare for the New Organizational Order Hardcover – August 10, 2010


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (August 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1422131653
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422131657
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.4 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #233,600 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“In an eye-opening 2010 book called Managing the Older Worker: How to Prepare for the New Organizational Order (Harvard Business Review Press), Peter Cappelli and Bill Novelli write that many companies are reluctant to hire or retain older workers — even though evidence shows that “on virtually every dimension that is relevant to employers, older workers come out ahead of their younger colleagues.” — CFO magazine

“Powerful” - The Economist

About the Author

Peter Cappelli is Professor of Management at the Wharton School and Director of Wharton's Center for Human Resources. He authored Talent on Demand and The New Deal at Work. Bill Novelli is the former CEO of AARP, a membership organization of 36 million people age fifty and older. He is the author of 50+: Igniting a Revolution to Reinvent America.

More About the Author

Peter Cappelli is the George W. Taylor Professor of Management and director of the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He holds a doctorate from the University of Oxford, and he conducts research in human resources practices, talent and performance management, and public policy related to employment. He is also the editor of Academy of Management Perspectives.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By JoAnn Becker on September 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Written for top executives and HR professionals, Peter Cappelli and Bill Novelli have brought focus to the strongest force now occurring for why organizations are not employing experienced (i.e., older) talent - the younger supervisors are uncomfortable managing older workers. Their copious research explains:

1. How this illegal age bias in today's market is far greater than the discrimination that occurred when women and minorities entered the workforce
2. Dispels all of the myths for not employing the older worker (e.g., they do not cost more)
3. Explains why all surviving organizations will need to employ the older worker.

Finally, they provide many examples of organizations who "get it" and what they are doing, and explain four management practices to be incorporated in organizational cultures for productive workforces.

A must read for every leader and HR professional, but also for supervisors and managers (both young and old), and workers of all age groups. The authors have too much research (on white and blue collar jobs, and within and outside of the US) to be ignored.

Organizations like Achieving Results from Change assist organizations to align with their findings and recommendations.
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Format: Hardcover
Age doesn't mean a decline in quality if managed right. "Managing the Older Worker: How to prepare for the New Organizational Order" is a guide for the manager faced with today's growing population of aging people in the workplace as retirement plans are failing and people are returning to the workforce. With advice on how to use these employers to empower one's workplace, be leaders through experience, and will often work because it's what they want to do rather than what they must do. "Managing the Older Worker" is a complete and comprehensive guide for readers who want a more complete understanding of how to manage the useful and complex aging worker.
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Format: Hardcover
As is the case of almost every other important business book, this one is research-driven as indicated by the footnotes on Pages 161-179. In it, Peter Cappelli and Bill Novelli explain how to prepare for what they characterize as "the new organizational order." Indeed, Peter Drucker would suggest (and I agree) that much of that order is already in place and all of it will be soon.

Of special interest to me is a role reversal in the workplace that is without precedent. It creates unique challenges to which Cappelli and Novelli refer in this excerpt from their Preface: "To oversimplify, younger managers don't really know how to manage older workers - and older workers don't know how to get what they need from their younger managers." They recommend a different approach, o0ne they explain during the course of their rigorous and insightful examination of what they characterize as of a neglected dimension of diversity."

They address issues associated with business challenges such as these:

o The defining (and unique) characteristics of "the older worker phenomenon"
o Various myths about older workers...and what in fact is true
o The nature of "new business realities" that must be accommodated
o The case for older workers
o How to confront ageism effectively
o How to helper younger supervisors
o How to "craft a better deal" for older workers
o How to make an older workforce "work for you"

Here are three excerpts that are representative of the several dozen passages that caught my eye:

"It is certainly true that older individuals use more health care than their younger colleagues. On the other hand, most employers still offer health-care benefits to employees and their [begin italics] dependents [end italics].
Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
In a great new book "Managing the Older Worker", authors Cappelli and Novelli start out by debunking some of the common myths that abound about older workers. For example, myths such as "older workers will not stay as long" (their turnover rate is actually lower than younger workers); "older workers will have less physical and mental ability" (the authors show that knowledge and experience account for these), are just two.

I was particularly impressed with the business case the authors put for employing older workers. For employers, the authors' extensive analysis of various research studies, is well described to define just what an older worker can bring to the workplace and how organisations really do need them. For instance, the things that older workers have in abundance - interpersonal skills and highly tuned cognitive ability - have increased in need in the workplace over recent decades by 36% and 35% respectively.

This book is timely. The average age of workers is getting older. Employers and indeed as the authors point out, governments need to be aware of not only what the older worker can bring to the workplace, but also how to best manage this growing workforce segment.

The book is well written with sufficient scenarios and short cases to show just how the authors' suggestions have or are, working in practice.

It's hard to find fault with this book. If I had to find one, I'd say that there is so much good information here about the older worker, that it takes a while to get through it all.

However, if you are an HR, L&D person or someone charged with employing, deploying, developing and training your organisation's people, this book is a must read. Highly recommended.

Bob Selden, author What To Do When You Become The Boss: How new managers become successful managers
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