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Managing Up: How to Forge an Effective Relationship With Those Above You Paperback – October 19, 2004


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Managing Up: How to Forge an Effective Relationship With Those Above You + Its Okay to Manage Your Boss: The Step-by-Step Program for Making the Best of Your Most Important Relationship at Work + Managing Your Manager: How to Get Ahead with Any Type of Boss
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Business (October 19, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385507739
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385507738
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

After fourteen years of working shoulder to shoulder with GE tough guy Jack Welch, Roseanne Badowski is not afraid of what she calls the "s-word." She argues that all of us are secretaries as well as managers. In Managing Up, Badowski leverages lessons she learned in building a stellar relationship with her boss. She offers smart and solid advice beginning with her "Can you start on Monday?" interview with Welch, and then turning to the skills of "navigating a boss Monday through Friday." The book' s chapter titles may sound prosaic, but her approach crackles with energy and fresh ideas. For example, she writes about trust by including "time-tested phrases for breaking bad news." She details the perils of being unprepared and puts in a good word for nagging. She also makes a persuasive argument for the advantages of cultivating impatience to enhance productivity. With splashy anecdotes and checklists, Badowski offers realistic and and disciplined counsel. Hero worshippers be warned: Although Welch wrote the book's introduction, Badowski is such an engaging no-nonsense advisor that she becomes the most compelling manager represented in her book. --Barbara Mackoff --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The business book market is jammed with books for bosses, telling them how to manage, lead, create corporate strategy and get more from employees. Badowski's tome takes a different approach, but is just as useful: it's meant for all workers, regardless of their position. Because, as she wisely points out, everyone has a boss. Badowski, who has the distinction of being Jack Welch's former executive assistant, here explains how she survived and thrived during her 14-plus years as the boss man's "secret weapon." She's written a snappy little guide, mixing anecdotes with clear-cut tips on how to partner with higher-ups. She advises readers to "make the agenda of the person you work for your own" and asserts that "individuals solve problems-not senior management." Of course, not everyone is lucky enough to have had such a celebrated corporate leader as his or her boss. But if workers can follow Badowski's advice, they may find ways to win over crabby supervisors-or at least strengthen their relationships with other colleagues.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Jane Berger on April 16, 2003
Format: Hardcover
"Managing Up" amounts to a practical and entertaining survival guide for those who find themselves somewhere on the food chain to the south of the lion kings of the corporate jungle. The author draws on her fifteen years as executive assistant to the legendary Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, to offer valuable insights, advice, and common sense perspective on what it takes to keep the boss happy, maximally productive, and hugely successful. Despite her admiration for Welch, Rosanne Badowski makes a compelling case for the vitally important role played by "support staff" in keeping business enterprises functioning smoothly. In fact, by the end of the book, it was clear to me that a considerable portion of the Jack Welch mystique was the product of the hard work, long hours and dedication that Badowski brought to the job. How do you run a massive operation like GE and spend almost every weekend on the golf course? You find a Rosanne, that's how. And what made "Ro" run? She says it's all about the pride and passion of being part of a winning team. But there is another P-word -- process. The Welch-Badowski team combined Jack's leadership genius with Rosanne's incredible talent for driving a relentless process that kept the CEO on top of things. "Managing Up" gives readers a good look at that process and at the rewards that come from hard work and doing one's best no matter who gets lionized.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Verne Harnish on April 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is a must-read, fabulous and fun (quick to read) book. I've never read such a straightforward and insightful look into the specific daily routine, style, and approach of a top executive. From her invaluable list on page 114 (how to prepare Jack so he was effective in meetings) to Chapter 11 on simplicity and how the annual calendar shaped Jack's routine, I picked up so many practical tips. And if you only read four pages, read pp. 156 - 159. I personally enjoyed the insider stories behind the Kidder Peabody mess and how Jack handles adversity (hint, he doesn't spend one minute looking in the past), to what Jack emotional felt when he had to let an executive go. You just don't get these kinds of insights anyplace else.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert Wynkoop on December 31, 2003
Format: Hardcover
After seeing Rosanne interviewed on the Today Show, I bought a copy for my wife who was working for an entrepreneur at the time, and one for my own administrative assistant. Neither of them, I think, finished the book so I figured that I might as well read it.
The most insight Badowski gives is that leadership does not flow always flow from the top down; rather, it can flow up the management ladder and lateral as well. If we define leadership in terms of influence rather than position this makes sense. The relationship between the executive and his subordinates should be one of mutual encouragement. Do not get me wrong here- I am not talking about the warm fuzzy feelings of New Age pop psychology, but of the blunt reality that my success in life, business and ministry depends on those above me, below me and along side me being successful. Rosanne simply states what should be oblivious to anyone- if we work for the success of those around us we too will succeed.
Yes, the book was full of insights and information on how to forge effective working relationships, but I have to come back to the observation I made in my first paragraph- my wife and secretary did not complete reading this book. I think they were expecting more of a textbook on how to be a effective administrative assistant. Much of the book, however, dealt with the history and corporate culture of Jack Welch and GE. Although I was fascinated by it, they found these parts irrelevant.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kollapse on June 9, 2005
Format: Paperback
...which explains her success as a partner with Jack Welch.

Ro has hit the nail on the head here. It's not really about keeping his favorite yogurt on tap or catering to his needs, it's about removing the obstacles and the minutiae so that the leadership can lead instead of wasting time on those things that can be done by others. It's more about being a true partner than it is about being a sterotypical assistant.

My take on this book is that although written by an assistant, it is applicable to anyone who has a boss and who wants to be a solution instead of just an employee. Many people take issue with being asked to handle things that they deem are "personal" for thier boss. That conversation is a waste of time and will be a deciding factor on how high you will go in your career. Make no mistake, for leaders of large organizations, there is no distinction between a personal and a work life. They are one. So, Ro really points out that being a solution for Jack sometimes meant that she had to make sure those "personal" things were managed to completion by someone other than Jack. That freed Jack up to take care of business.

Pre-managing your boss is a great way to bring speed to the entire organization. Ro stated early on that she was a creator of time. That is one of the most powerful offers that one can make to their boss and their organization. Time is the most precious asset that many of us claim to not have enough of. By ensuring that Jack didn't have to sweat the small stuff and sift through unneccessary crap, she was able to create the time for Jack to become the leader he is and to bring more prosperity to the organization and the people who support it. Be it personal or business, she handled it.
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