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Mande Music: Traditional and Modern Music of the Maninka and Mandinka of Western Africa (Chicago Studies in Ethnomusicology) Paperback – October 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0226101620 ISBN-10: 0226101622 Edition: 1st

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Mande Music: Traditional and Modern Music of the Maninka and Mandinka of Western Africa (Chicago Studies in Ethnomusicology) + African Rhythm and African Sensibility: Aesthetics and Social Action in African Musical Idioms
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Product Details

  • Series: Chicago Studies in Ethnomusicology
  • Paperback: 500 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press; 1 edition (October 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226101622
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226101620
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #808,990 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Charry brings a keen analytical ear and practical eye to these musical traditions, as well as extensive library and archival research. . . a great resource and reference point for anthropologists and historians of West Africa, and anyone interested in African music. It is also pleasant to read. . . The detailed documentation is animated throughout by his respect and admiration for a great musical tradition." -- Times Literary Supplement (June 29, 2001)

"exhaustive . . .  Charry's work should be an example for others to follow. . . a much-awaited addition to the study of West African musics, and will surely be an indispensable reference for many years to come." -- Research in African Literatures vol. 32, no. 2 (2001)

"a superb descriptive job. . . . an excellent and comprehensive model of the study of African music, this volume is a must for all students of African music and ethnomusicology." -- Choice

From the Inside Flap

With Mande Music, Eric Charry offers the most comprehensive source available on one of Africa's richest and most sophisticated music cultures. Using resources as disparate as early Arabic travel accounts, oral histories, and archival research as well as his own extensive studies in Mali, Guinea, Senegal, and The Gambia, Charry traces this music culture from its origins pre-dating the thirteenth-century Mali empire to the recording studios of Paris and New York. He focuses on the four major spheres of Mande music-hunter's music, music of the jelis or griots, jembe and other drumming, and guitar-based modern music-exploring how each developed, the types of instruments used, the major artists, and how each sphere relates to the others. With its maps, illustrations, and musical transcriptions as well as an exhaustive bibliography, discography, and videography and a compact disc (available separately) this book is essential reading for those seeking an in-depth look at one of the most exciting, innovative, and deep-rooted phenomena on the world music scene.

More About the Author

Eric Charry is Professor of Music at Wesleyan University, where he teaches courses on music in Africa, music in the Americas, rock and r&b, and improvisation.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 6 customer reviews
Especially amazing are the 28-page bibliography and 24-page discography/videography (all in fine print).
Phil Rogers
This is an excellent source of information, if you want to expand your mind with new musical notions and information this is the book for you.
St. Pete Mom
In a time when our world is getting a little smaller, Eric gives us the information in a clear and concise manner.
Alan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Phil Rogers on July 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
A couple of years back I was perusing the contents of production sampling CD's, hunting for African percussion sounds to write music with on my sampling keyboard. I kept coming across names for drums like "tatango", "sabar", "sabaro", "kutiriba", "kutirindingo", and so on. I wondered that the different names meant, and how are/were these instruments used together to generate music, either traditional-sounding or else a fusion of various elements/styles? And what did the drums look like, and how was each one crafted? (Oftentimes these made-for-producers' CD's are remarkably devoid of useful documentation.) I found all the answers I needed in this book, clearly delineated.
For starters, the Mande people and their close relatives inhabit a relatively large area of westernmost Africa, including much of Mali, Guinea, and Senegambia, as well as parts of the Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, and to a lesser extent, other surrounding countries.
As regards this specific topic alluded to above - the farthest western branch of the Mande world mainly uses a three-drum ensemble of modified hourglass-shaped drums (waisted drums, shaped somewhat like a section of the symmetrical outline of a female torso as seen frontally or from behind). The ensemble is known collectively as "kutiro". The drums usually use peg-style tuning rather than the more familiar Malian weave tuning/suspension seen on djembe drums from further to the east.
Tatango and sabaro are synonyms for the kutiro ensemble. Sabaro is also the name of one of the three (different-sized) drums of the ensemble--kutiriba and kutirindingo are the others. By contrast, the "sabar" drums are further to the west, from the coastal Wolof tribe, a non-Mande people.
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By michel wittek on September 29, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
magnifique!
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By igael on July 18, 2014
Format: Paperback
bien
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