Manhattan R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(233) IMDb 8/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

Woody Allen portrays a very successful television writer who is tired of churning out pap comedy, and sets out to write a serious novel. He can make people laugh, but can he make them feel? Allen seems also set on collecting for himself every neurosis known to humankind. He sometimes lives with teenager Mariel Hemingway, but their age difference is producing guilt. Introduced to Diane Keaton, Allen finds her annoying, aggressive...and fascinating. He leaves Hemingway, however, Keaton returns to her former lover, Allen's best friends, and they become "just friends." Allen's ex-wife (Meryl Streep) has written a successful book, "Marriage, Divorce and Selfhood"--it turns Allen into a worldwide weirdo and explains her newfound lesbianism. When the abandoned Hemingway is about to leave the country to finish her education, Allen realizes the depth of his love for her.

Starring:
Woody Allen, Diane Keaton
Runtime:
1 hour 37 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Manhattan

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, Comedy
Director Woody Allen
Starring Woody Allen, Diane Keaton
Supporting actors Michael Murphy, Mariel Hemingway, Meryl Streep, Anne Byrne Hoffman, Karen Ludwig, Michael O'Donoghue, Victor Truro, Tisa Farrow, Helen Hanft, Bella Abzug, Gary Weis, Kenny Vance, Charles Levin, Karen Allen, David Rasche, Damion Scheller, Wallace Shawn, Mark Linn-Baker
Studio MGM
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Gorgeous cinematography, great dialogue and acting.
Matthew Christ
Mariel Hemingway, great music, classic Woody Allen comic attitude, and that great black and white photography by Gordon Willis - did I mention Mariel Hemingway?
Roger J. Schuman
You never feel overwhelmed, just saddened by the fact that the film is very honest.
Michael Crane

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

159 of 172 people found the following review helpful By David Kusumoto on November 14, 2001
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In 1979, Woody had the burden of trying to capture the "originality" of "Annie Hall," the Oscar-winning Best Picture of 1977.

So when "Manhattan" was released, Woody's first "true" widescreen picture (so much so that Woody insisted this film NEVER be released on video or shown on television without the black bars on the top and bottom of the screen), I wasn't quite sure what to expect.

I discovered that "Manhattan" had a completely different tone than "Annie Hall." It was more serious, but still hilarious. I became so enraptured by its themes, its music and its atmosphere that I felt, until I saw "Schindler's List" in late 1993, that I had witnessed something that comes along only once or twice a generation...and that's true greatness on film. I paid to see "Manhattan" at least four times during its initial run in 1979. I had never done this before, even when I include those popcorn pictures I had seen several times put out by Spielberg and Lucas during the 1970s. I found "Manhattan" simply incredible, so "on the mark," so revelatory about the weaknesses of people, especially so-called "intelligent" people.

Rather than go over the plot, I believe "Manhattan's" themes include the following:

1. intellectualism is overrated.
2. romance is illogical and unscientific.
3. words don't always match our actions.
4. moral structure is a man-made invention.
5. fidelity is an optimistic ideal.
6. skeletons in the closet are better left unsaid.
7. uncorrupted optimism is mostly found in young people.
8. cynicism increases as you grow old.
9. advancing years = more unnecessary baggage.
10. The more you know, the more it can hurt you.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 2000
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
No matter how many times I watch this piece of heavan, I still get teary at the line "you gotta have a little faith in people..." This is a movie with so much beauty and depth, humor and poignant romanticism. I can even accept Issac's (Woody Allen) older man/young girl romance ( and usually I am annoyed by the prevalance of this type of pairing in so many movies ) because to me ,the endearing Tracy, (Mariel Hemingway so SO wonderful here) represents the tender spirit of love, the open heart that simply feels what it feels. She is the point on which the movie pivots, with her sweet goodness and simple message of emotional purity in contrast to the over analysis the other older characters give love. There are so many levels on which to appreciate this movie. I could try to analyze it in words (as Woody and his complex, terrific cast of characters analyze their lives and loves...) but instead, I have to just tell you all with FEELING: Visit this film, the magical, dreamy, spectacular, perfect place...Manhattan.
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36 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 6, 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When Woody Allen won the Oscar (in abstentia) for writing and directing "Annie Hall," which also won the Oscar for Best Picture, it was assumed the stand-up comic turned auteur had reached the pinnacle of his career. Then Allen proceeded to go out and make an even better film with his next effort, "Manhattan." Filmed in glorious black & white (and widescreen) by the great cinematographer Gordon Willis, the opening sequence combining indelible images of New York City with Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue" is a paean to city Allen loves and the most rhapsodical sequence in any of his films.
Rather than talking about the plot per se, "Manhattan" is best explained as a convoluted series of wrecked and ruined relationships centering around Allen's character, Isaac Davis. Isaac is divorced from Jill (Meryl Streep), who is now living with Connie (Karen Ludwig), and planning to write an expose on her marriage. Isaac is having an affair with 17-year-old Tracy (Mariel Hemingway), but then he meets Mary (Diane Keaton), the mistress of his best friend Yale (Michael Murphy), who is married to Emily (Anne Byrne). Ultimately, however, this is not a film about love, but rather a film about loss, because you just know that forced to make choices, Isaac is going to make the wrong ones. Tracy and Mary are characters constructed as such polar opposites and it never dawns on Isaac to focus more on what each has than on what they lack.
Of course, today this film is obviously open to reinterpretation given Allen's very public personal life and it is now assumed that the Isaac-Tracy relationship was a sign of things to come rather than a dramatic construction.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Fink on May 10, 2002
Format: DVD
It makes me sad (not to mention angry) that some people make the statement that this movie is about "a child molestor." The same people who say this are the ones that praise "There's Something About Mary" and "American Pie" for it's "comic innovativeness." This is NOT a documentary, it is simply a situation, and Tracy (the girl) was not forced into her position as girlfriend--it is a choice. Let's not forget this was the 70s, and while that's not an excuse, shame on those who imply that this beautiful movie is simply about a man and an underage girl.
That said, this is one of the most gorgeous movies ever made. Although "Hannah and Her Sisters" is probably my favorite Woody Allen movies, this is Allen's cinematic masterpiece. Words can't describe how beautiful the lights of Manhattan look as they sparkle through the trees in Central Park. But the acting shines as well. Diane Keaton is both hilarious and sad as a neurotic woman who is so full of herself and yet so unlucky in love; Woody Allen plays a divorced, neurotic man (shocker. . .); and while Mariel Hemingway isn't terrible, the tone of her voice and her manner did grate on my nerves a little. . .but that didn't ruin the movie at all. She is the voice of reason not only to Issac (Allen's character) but for the entire film.
It's a true testament to the genius of Allen that his movies, which usually end so sad, can still fill you with hope. It's as if he's telling the audience that it's the journey, not the destination, that's important. Everything about "Manhattan" shines, even after more than 20 years. I highly suggest this movie to anyone who hasn't seen it.
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