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Guy Mannering (Penguin Classics) Paperback – November 25, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Paperback: 552 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (November 25, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014043657X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140436570
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.9 x 5.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #456,236 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The volumes have been carefully and critically edited from the original manuscripts and now the texts, which in each case capture large numbers of readings never before printed and clear away elements of corruption in existing editions, are as close to what Scott originally wrote as the skills of the editorial team can make them. The Edinburgh Edition respects Scott the artist by 'restoring' versions of the novels that are not quite what his first readers saw. Indeed, it returns to manuscripts that the printers never handled, as Scott's fiction before 1827 was transcribed before it reached the printshop. Each volume of the Edinburgh edition presents an uncluttered text of one work, followed by an Essay on the Text by the editor of the work, a list of the emendations that have been made to the first edition, explanatory notes and a glossary! The editorial essays are histories of the respective texts. Some of them are almost 100 pages long; when they are put together they constitute a fascinating and lucid account of Scott's methods of compostion and his financial manoeuvres. This edition is for anyone who takes Scott seriously. The Edinburgh Edition is essential to any Scott scholar![the student] will turn first to the superbly specific textual essays that follow the readings. Unique to this handsome edition is Scott's graphic depiction of characters from Edinburgh's literary scene. The latest additions to the monumental Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels ! all three editors maintain consistently high quality in preparing what will surely be the standard edition of Scott's complete novels ! as might be expected, the Essays on the Text are of central importance in the editions, because of the minutely detailed yet lucid accounts of the textual choices made. The volumes have been carefully and critically edited from the original manuscripts and now the texts, which in each case capture large numbers of readings never before printed and clear away elements of corruption in existing editions, are as close to what Scott originally wrote as the skills of the editorial team can make them. The Edinburgh Edition respects Scott the artist by 'restoring' versions of the novels that are not quite what his first readers saw. Indeed, it returns to manuscripts that the printers never handled, as Scott's fiction before 1827 was transcribed before it reached the printshop. Each volume of the Edinburgh edition presents an uncluttered text of one work, followed by an Essay on the Text by the editor of the work, a list of the emendations that have been made to the first edition, explanatory notes and a glossary! The editorial essays are histories of the respective texts. Some of them are almost 100 pages long; when they are put together they constitute a fascinating and lucid account of Scott's methods of compostion and his financial manoeuvres. This edition is for anyone who takes Scott seriously. The Edinburgh Edition is essential to any Scott scholar![the student] will turn first to the superbly specific textual essays that follow the readings. Unique to this handsome edition is Scott's graphic depiction of characters from Edinburgh's literary scene. The latest additions to the monumental Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels ! all three editors maintain consistently high quality in preparing what will surely be the standard edition of Scott's complete novels ! as might be expected, the Essays on the Text are of central importance in the editions, because of the minutely detailed yet lucid accounts of the textual choices made. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.

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Customer Reviews

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The story has a fast pace with lots of action and suspense.
Mr Peter G George
Kudos to Penguin Classics for tapping into the Edinburgh Edition and providing us with a cheap, well-annotated text of this neglected classic!
Waverley36
With this background I approached Guy Mannering with some trepidation but ended up enjoying the book thoroughly.
Amis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Mr Peter G George on March 12, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Scott's second novel Guy Mannering begins in the 1760s and concludes "near the end of the American war" in the early 1780s. Scott is deliberately vague about dates, as his focus in this novel is not on historical events or persons. The story begins with Guy Mannering's chance visit to Ellangowan the home of the Bertrams a noble Scottish family somewhat in decline. It is the night when Henry Bertram is born and Mannering an amateur astrologer sets out to make a chart of the boy's future. He is disturbed by the result however, and declines to reveal what he has foreseen, asking the family to wait five years before reading the prediction. Mannering leaves only to return some twenty years later to find that the fate of the Bertram family has become intimately connected with that of his own and that somehow, despite his own scepticism about his abilities as an astrologer, his predictions in an uncanny way have mirrored events.

Scott's skill as a storyteller is shown well in this novel. The story has a fast pace with lots of action and suspense. The major characters are confronted with the dangers of a lawless time, including murder, smuggling and abduction. Moreover, they must carry out their romances despite the disapproval of their parents. As is so often the case with Scott, much of the pleasure from reading the tale comes from the various minor characters he describes. Dominie Sampson is an unforgettable character hilariously awkward of speech and manner, constantly exclaiming "prodigious", but fiercely loyal to the Bertram family. Meg Merrilies, an unusually tall, mysterious gypsy fortune-teller, is likewise fascinating with her apparently supernatural ability to influence events.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By P. J. Carter on October 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
This novel combines action, humor, unforgettable characters and intelligent writing. The author takes you into the landscape-you feel every bump in the road. A very accessible novel, considering Scott's other works. While I loved The Antiquarian, the Bride of Lammermoor, Waverly and Rob Roy, Guy Mannering is the best so far, with a plot that never falters and a few heroes that inspire admiration as well as inquiry. There is also little of the thick, unintelligible scot's dialect that can trip up the average reader. While Scott falls short on his female love interest,(she's only human) he excels in the character of the female lead, a brave gypsy filled with a sense of her own doom.

Please read Scott. He's good, and good for you.

Note to dog-lovers: the fun-loving Dandie Dinmont Terrier takes its name from this novel.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Waverley36 on February 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read Walter Scott for atmosphere, for mood, for humor and characterization and perhaps most of all, to listen to his voice. Scott has an endearingly present narrative persona--he's that chatty, knowledgeable, and even slightly eccentric uncle, the one with all the hobbies and interests and entirely too many books, who seems to be a kind of expert on every subject. The best Scott novels tap into this feeling of cozy kinship and exploit it, and in the end this is often more important than the story proper.

More than many other Waverley novels, more than Waverley itself certainly, Scott's second novel, Guy Mannering (1815), excels at producing this complicated, friendly, peculiar narrative hodge-podge. There's a bit of everything here, from romantic scenery to sharp satire, from a bookish name-dropping to curse-muttering gypsies. There's smugglers and kidnappers, astrologers and cranks, the Scottish lowlands and the English lake district. Like all Scott, there's old and new joyfully intermingled--a birth mystery worthy of Tom Jones yet a good deal of what would become Treasure Island. More Gothic and less historical than Waverley, more fun than Heart of Midlothian, less forced than Ivanhoe, this novel was an unexpected treat. It remains underrated and understudied.

Consider that Scott dashed this novel out in six weeks, and you'll get some idea of both his own considerable talents and also the casualness, almost carelessness of its tone. Like all of his novels, Guy Mannering should be imbibed slowly, savored rather than gulped. Kudos to Penguin Classics for tapping into the Edinburgh Edition and providing us with a cheap, well-annotated text of this neglected classic!

Addendum: Someone asked me, so I thought I'd add: this is the novel featuring Dandy Dinmont, for whom the popular terrier is named.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. M Mills TOP 1000 REVIEWER on October 6, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Guy Mannering is the second of the Waverly novels by Scotland's greatest novelist Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). The novel was first published in 1815 cementing quondom poet Scott's best selling fame with the general public.
The novel begins on a dark and stormy night in southwest Scotland during the reign of George III. England and Scotland were united as Great Britain in 1707; one of Scott's motivation for penning the Waverly novels was to introduce English readers to their new fellow citizens north of the border.
Guy Mannering is a young Englishman who finds shelter from the storm at the estate of the Laird of Ellangowan. Mannering enjoys astronomy and astrology. He predicts to Mr. Bertram, owner of Ellangowan, that he will have a son who will face momentous events during his fifth, tenth and twenty-first year of life. That night is born Harry Bertram. A few years later Harry is stolen at the age of five by smugglers aided and abetted by the evil lawyer the odious Glisson.
Sixteen years pass. Mrs Betram has died and her husband the weak laird also sinks into the grave insolvent. The lawyer Glissin obtains the estate. Nothing has been heard of little Harry who had been abducted on the same night his protector on a mountain ride Mr. Frank Kennedy, a government revenue agent, was murdered. Harry Bertram (under the pseudonymn of Mr, Brown) returns to Scotland. He had been raised in Holland and became a British soldier in India serving under Colonel Guy Mannering. Mannering and Henry have quarreled. Henry is in love with Julia Mannering the high spirited daughter of the Colonel. While on his way back home to Ellengowan, Henry meets Mr. Dandie Dinmont a colorful farmer who is being beaten by thugs on a dark road.
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