Customer Reviews


118 Reviews
5 star:
 (89)
4 star:
 (19)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book
Modern men are in a crisis according to Stephen Mansfield, in his latest book entitled Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men. The crisis is found in men who don’t take responsibility for the children they father, and in the increasing number of men entrapped in the criminal justice system. The cause of this crisis can be found in the changing role of men resulting...
Published 11 months ago by James A. Barnes

versus
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good idea, but tries to cover too much
Stephen Mansfield’s book that describes itself a “an utterly invigorating guide to being your most masculine self” was a book I looked so forward to reading. At first, I was very thrilled by what the pages contained. Mansfield begins with his “Four Manly Maxims” that are important for men to hold. I agree with them wholeheartedly, and he...
Published 8 months ago by Adam Faughn


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

39 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Book, November 19, 2013
Modern men are in a crisis according to Stephen Mansfield, in his latest book entitled Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men. The crisis is found in men who don’t take responsibility for the children they father, and in the increasing number of men entrapped in the criminal justice system. The cause of this crisis can be found in the changing role of men resulting from the feminist movement and the absence of positive male role models in most modern families. In the book Mansfield describes what it takes to be a manly man, and how, through the example of many men throughout history, average men have overcome challenges to become great men who lead nations and change the course of world events. He presents the characteristics of manly men, and how every man should strive to become manly men of character.

Particularly inspiring are the backgrounds of Harry Truman and Winston Churchill. These two men came from different backgrounds and suffered many failures throughout life, to lead their nations through the Second World War. Harry Truman, didn’t have a formal education like most modern American presidents, but became more knowledgeable and wise through self-study and becoming an insatiable reader. Through the examples of these great men, Mansfield shows how today’s men can also achieve greatness.

I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Manly Men, November 29, 2013
By 
To be a man is to: ? The age old adage goes one way or another depending on who you ask. For those who fought to protect their country’s freedom, manliness lies in sacrifice, tears, and bloodshed. For another it may be in exploring unknown frontiers, uncovering what has not been seen. And for yet another, loving a woman is their definition of manhood.

Each man knows, however, that manliness is not encapsulated by a singular definition. That would be like describing a tree simply as tall; while omitting its fruit, leaves, provision of shade, or texture. In the same way, men are made up of a plethora of qualities.

Intro, Stephen Mansfield, stage left. Mansfield’s wonderfully titled Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men purposes to resurrect “your inborn, timeless, essential, masculine self.” Listing four “Manly Maxims” and sixteen attributes that collectively define manliness Mansfield calls out to men who are aiming to restore the original image of man to their life.

Being a man has always been a goal of mine. Having the XY chromosome is not enough. I want to crochet a scarf, and wear it while I climb a 14k mountain. I want to read a poem to woo a beautiful woman (You can find her on twitter @robynmederich). I want to prepare a meal and eat it at a table and chairs that I also built. All of these things are manly, but they aren’t enough. A man doesn’t comprise of external affairs only. A man will find himself complete when he combines external adventures with internal traits.

Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men is a great guide for men of any station in life. White collar, blue collar, no collar; men from all can gain from this book.

Call me crazy but I believe the book has been intentionally designed to bring reading pleasure to a man. The hard exterior with cloth binding is enjoyable to hold. Brief but direct chapters confront a man sharply, but not insultingly. Perfect font size and line spacing make it easy for the eyes to breeze through and brain to remember.

Each chapter discusses a character trait a historical person (and neat artistic drawing of them) to illustrate the character trait with. The end of each chapter contains personal/group questions as a way to analyze one’s own life. There are songs, poems, and quotes by notable manly figures which aid the book’s overall theme, aesthetic, and goal of helping men become manly men.

I highly recommend this book to men. Women, it’s just not for you. Not in a “Little Rascal – He-man, woman-hater” way, but more like how you don’t want me in the kitchen when you’re in there, Robyn. I totally get it. :-)

Also, please know this is not a right-wing-conservative, blow-stuff-up, be-a-jerk, drink beer, eat meat, rock-n-roll book. This book is about redeeming man’s purpose on this earth. To be strong, caring, legacy-leaving, intentional, God fearing manly men.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent overview, November 22, 2013
Mansfield's Book of Manly Men, offers what it promises: an explanation of what true masculinity and manliness looks like, at least in Mansfield's opinion. In a world where manliness and masculinity are often frowned upon, books like this are always pretty refreshing even when I don't agree with everything they have to say.

Perhaps one of the most important elements of this book is that it doesn't condone the feminist movement by encouraging men to be more like women, nor does it ask men to behave in ways that women find appealing. Instead, this book is an urging for men to return to godly manliness, to stand up for what the believe in, to behave honorably, and to do the right thing even when it's difficult.

This book also contains plenty of quotes, stories, and historical fun facts to keep things interesting. If you're looking for a book to use in a class discussion, there are plenty of study questions included.

Mansfield's is separated into two sections. The first includes his maxims. This section gives a thorough overview of what being a man generally entails and what Mansfield believes makes a man manly and masculine. The second section includes trademarks of masculinity, including friendship, integrity, and forgiveness. Each chapter gives an overview of what this trademark looks like, includes discussion questions, and often a poem or Psalm. There are pictures throughout the book, as well.

I'd suggest this for teenagers or young men who aren't really sure what they want to be or how they want to behave, but who want to make a difference in the lives of the people around them. If you're looking for something that's going to help build character, this book is a good starting point.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good idea, but tries to cover too much, February 13, 2014
By 
Adam Faughn (Nashville, TN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Stephen Mansfield’s book that describes itself a “an utterly invigorating guide to being your most masculine self” was a book I looked so forward to reading. At first, I was very thrilled by what the pages contained. Mansfield begins with his “Four Manly Maxims” that are important for men to hold. I agree with them wholeheartedly, and he illustrates his four points very well.

For the remainder of the text of the book–which is the bulk of the material–Mansfield then shares many traits that men need to have in their lives. Traits such as humility, humor, presence and many others fill the pages. Each chapter, then, uses a historical figure to illustrate that masculine trait and how it made a difference. In theory, it was a good idea. To my mind, though, this stretched the book a little far. The chapters are very uneven, both in length and in their strength. Personally, I think Mansfield tried to do too much in one book by covering all these areas in addition to the “manly maxims” that are in the first part.

Overall, the book has some great material for illustrations and quotations. It is obvious that Mansfield has done his homework in collecting materials for each of his chapters. I would have rather the book dug more in-depth into the “manly maxims,” and the multiple chapters on qualities been another book. Trying to do both watered down an otherwise good and very needed book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure trove of wisdom!, December 10, 2013
Of all the books on manhood that I have read in 2013, this is by far the best and one that I would highly recommend if you are still looking for a Christmas present for a friend (or have a son who is coming into his teenage/young adult years). This book presents a solid, Christian defense of manhood and offers an honest criticism of the failings of many men—particularly those who revel in permanent adolescence or aggressive machismo.

At the outset, Mansfield introduces what he considers the four essential manly maxims:
-Manly men do manly things
-Manly men tend their fields
-Manly men build manly men
-Manly men live to the glory of God

Here we see the focus of this book: Mansfield wants to outline the importance of action, responsibility, brotherhood, and godliness. Each of these elements is an aspect of to what it means to be a man, far more so than the presence of barrel-sized biceps or epic Duck Dynasty beards.

In the second (and largest) section of the book, Mansfield points to the lives of figures such as Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill, Rudyard Kipling, G.K. Chesteron, Booker T. Washington, and Witold Pilecki to demonstrate different aspects of manly character. I found these portraits really intriguing and their life stories excellently illustrated the character traits of integrity, quest, honor, legacy, restoration, forgiveness, humility, and many more. The wide array of these qualities pieced together a really complex and compelling vision of manhood. Mansfield shows time and time again how struggles and suffering turned men into godly examples.

The last section of the book—which is short, but really interesting—is an appendices looking at fifty quotes, ten books, and ten movies that the author finds particularly important in encouraging godly manhood. This section wasn’t mind-blowing, but many quotes are worth putting up on the wall of your home office or sharing with your men’s group.

Simply put: This book offers a treasury of wisdom to reflect upon and life stories that will inspire you to new heights. This book is a great addition to any man’s library! I highly recommend it.

(This book was received free of charge from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to give a positive review)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This one fell flat on inspiration, January 26, 2014
By 
Michael Lee (Brooklyn, MI USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
“I want you to experience manhood by example rather than by precept.” That’s Stephen Mansfield’s intent in his book, “Mansfield’s Book of Manly Men”. I liked the overall premise, but it was quite under-developed. He didn’t convince me. Instead, some of it exuded more “girly-man” aspects than “manly”. In short, I still recommend “Wild at Heart” as the book for manly men. Nevertheless, I need to provide a full report of this one.

The book is divided into three parts, and each chapter is quickly readable. By far, I thought the best part of the book was the Foreword, which was written by Lt. Gen William G. Boykin (retired), former commander of Delta Force. If I were to write a book about manly men, someone like Boykin would definitely be the one to do it. Boykin did well at setting up the tone of the book, whetting my appetite for a hard-hitting guy book. “What makes a man a warrior is his willingness to place himself between what he holds dear and anything that threatens it. Honor is the chief motivator for the warrior. Dishonor is unthinkable. He does the right thing without expectation of reward because honor is an intrinsic value that, when manifested in one’s life, provides its own rewards” (p. xvii). Good stuff, indeed. I had similar high-level expectations for the rest of the book. Although I was inspired by his last chapter, “Presence”, I didn’t find the book – as a whole – to be very inspiring.

Here’s the general layout of the book:

In Part 1, Mansfield sets forth his four “Manly Maxims”. Those are as follows:
#1 – Manly Men do Manly Things
#2 – Manly Men Tend Their Fields
#3 – Manly Men Build Manly Men
#4 – Manly Men Live to the Glory of God

In Part 2, Mansfield presents several characteristics of “Manly Men”. This is where the book began to fall, in my opinion. While I like the premise, I found the chapters to be relatively weak on impact. I was greatly disappointed with the first chapter, “Honor”.

Honor is a great virtue; it’s powerful. Sadly, the chapter is not. Although Mansfield intended to inspire men to greatness and godly strength, he chose a rather weak example to begin his quest. Of all the great men in the world who have lived honorable, noble, and inspirational lives, Mansfield chose Jabez as his first exemplar. You remember Jabez, don’t you – the guy who “inspired” the book, “The Prayer of Jabez”? Well, Mansfield chose him as the “man of honor”, so to speak. It was weak, indeed. Sadly, it lowered the tone for the remainder of the book as many chapters similarly lacked inspirational depth.

It wasn’t until the last chapter, “Presence”, that I finally felt inspired. Here, Mansfield spoke of famed basketball coach John Wooden. Something about Wooden’s mere presence moved people. Manly men radiate something powerful when then they enter a room, something that arises from their lives, something that surrounds them, something that draws others in and makes others better. He wrote, “If your version of manhood is principled and holy and turned toward the good of others, it will simply radiate – as it should” (pp. 237-238).

Finally, in Part 3, Mansfield offers his favorite quotes, books, and movies for “Manly Men”. In short, I agreed with very few of his recommendations. I thought, in fact, he could have chosen more manly books and movies than he did. There was no mention of courage- and honor-inspiring books like “Lone Survivor” or “Roberts Ridge”, or movies like “Braveheart” or “300”.

Rating: I give Manly Men just 2 1/2 stars. Without the Foreword and the last chapter, “Presence”, I thought this book would have completely collapsed.

Disclaimer: I received this book free of charge from Booksneeze (Thomas Nelson Books) in exchange for my unbiased review of it. All opinions are mine and were not forced upon me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nothing here that my wife or mother wouldn't support, or that my children wouldn't benefit from, December 2, 2013
This review is from: Mansfield's Book of Manly Men: An Utterly Invigorating Guide to Being Your Most Masculine Self (Hardcover)
Over the last few years I've read several books on "what it means to be a man." Some have been good and some not so much. Mansfield's is easily my favorite.

I chose to read this book because I read Mansfield's The Search for God and Guinness a few years ago. It was one of the most interesting and well written history books I'd read, and it's one that I've thought back on often since then. So I was eager to read Mansfield's newest, and it didn't disappoint.

Mr. Mansfield's book does not promote the stereotype of a "manly man." There's no praise for the sexist, domineering, loud, or brawling. Instead, the characteristics of manliness Mr. Mansfield encourages are humility, thoughtfulness, self-sacrifice, integrity... There's nothing upheld in this book that my wife or mother wouldn't support, or that my children wouldn't benefit from.
Mansfield introduces us to his four "Manly Maxim's" early on:

"Manly men do manly things,"
"Manly men tend their fields," (after reading this one I fixed that broken ceiling fan that I had put off)
"Manly men build manly men," and
"Manly men live to the glory of God."

These maxims are explored, and readers are given examples of men from the past who have exemplified the manly virtues. We read of Winston Churchill, Booker T. Washington, Rudyard Kipling, and others worthy of study. Mansfield does not paint a perfect picture of these men. He points out their flaws--sometimes major flaws--but shows how they overcame them, just as we can.

Reading this book has caused me to think deeply about my life. It encourages me to be a better husband, father, friend, and member of the community. I hope to instill these virtues in my own son and the other young men in my life, and I'll definitely recommend this book to them.

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Does It Take to Be a Man?, December 8, 2013
By 
W. T. Parsons "Daddypundit" (Abingdon, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Mansfield's Book of Manly Men: An Utterly Invigorating Guide to Being Your Most Masculine Self (Hardcover)
I have long been a fan of Stephen Mansfield's books. I have even had the privilege to interview him. But I have never anticipated a book as much as his latest volume, Mansfield's Book of Manly Men: An Utterly Invigorating Guide to Being Your Most Masculine Self.

His inspiration for this book was drawn from King David's deathbed instruction to his son Solomon: "I'm about to go the way of all the earth. So be strong and show yourself a man." (1 Kings 2:2). Solomon would have likely known exactly what David meant by that statement. But most men today would not because our culture has so utterly confused men about what their true role should be. Or as the author puts it:

My goal in this book is simple. I want to identify what a genuine man does - the virtures, the habits, the disciplines, the duties, the actions of true manhood - and then call men to do it. (pg. 8)

He starts out by setting out four principles that he refers to as Mansfield's Maxims:

Manly Men Do Manly Things (pg. 21)
Manly Men Tend Their Fields (pg. 28)
Manly Men Build Manly Men (pg. 34)
Manly Men Live to the Glory of God (pg. 37)

After presenting these principles, he then explores a number of virtues (such as honor, integrity, vision, etc.) that a real man should reflect in his life. With each principle there is an example from history of someone who personified that virtue in their life. This is a very useful approach as I think men tend to understand these principles much better when there is a concrete example to look upon who demonstrates these virtues. Most importantly, at the end of each chapter are a series of questions that are intended to be used for individual reflection and application of these principles.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would highly recommend it to other men to read. In addition, if you have a son of your own this is a book you will want to read together. The questions throughout the book also would make it ideal for small group discussion.

It's time for men to step up and fulfill the role that God has for them. Thanks to Stephen Mansfield, we have a guide to show us how to do it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Book By Men For Men And About Men, December 4, 2013
By 
Nathan Albright (Portland, OR USA) - See all my reviews
[Note: This book was received free of charge from Booksneeze/Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for an honest review.]

With its cheeky and immodest title, its unabashed focus on men, and its 19th century-style cover, it would be easy for an unsympathetic reader to judge this book by its cover and to dismiss it out of hand as being sexist and hostile to women. Such a judgment would be entirely unwarranted, as this book represents a solid and Christian defense of manhood that is at once tender and loving towards women as well as honest and unsparing in its criticism of the failings of many men, particularly those who revel in permanent adolescence or preening machismo. This book has a clear point to make about what makes a man, and it makes that point honestly and directly, and with a good deal of humor that is more than hinted at on its cover, as well as with a degree of genuine pathos that is touching and a bit surprising, and even a bit sappy (in a good way).

This book is divided into three parts. The first part talks about four manly maxims: “Manly men do manly things,” “Manly men tend their fields,” “Manly men build manly men,” and “Manly men live to the glory of God.” Here we see the focus of this book, in dealing with action, responsibility, brotherhood, and godliness. Each of these elements is an essential aspect to what it means to be a man, even if one would never be confused with being macho. The second part of the book looks at historical examples from such historical figures as Jabez, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, Rudyard Kipling, Job, Jonathan, G.K. Chesteron, Booker T. Washington, and Witold Pilecki to demonstrate different aspects of manly character like integrity, humor, sacrifice, knowledge, friendship, quest, honor, legacy, restoration, wildness, forgiveness, and humility. The wide array of these qualities suggests a whole vision of manhood that includes all aspects of what it takes to be a man and a focus on character rather than appearance. The third part of the book, which is quite short, looks at 50 quotes, ten books, and ten movies that the author finds particularly important in encouraging godly manhood.

At the real heart of this book is its stories, in the way in which it shows how struggles and suffering turned men into godly examples. The author makes a very sensible and often forgotten point that we become genuine men (and, I suppose the same would be true of women) as a result of overcoming the difficulties of our life and testing our strength against the trials we face inside and outside. All too often it is easy to mock men for a lack of responsibility even while men continually face dishonor and abuse from an uncaring world that simply refuses to let men be men, or to appreciate a man who acts with honor and integrity in a world of treachery and crookedness. For its defense of manhood, and not merely talking about manhood, but acting as a man, and for its defense of manhood based on character rather than mere appearance, this book is a very excellent one. For its quotes and stories alone it will serve as a treasure trove for my own reflections on what it takes to be a man, not merely in chronological age, but in maturity. The highest, and most deserved, praise I can give for this book is that it describes the sort of man I may approximate in my better moments, and which I hope to be not only for myself, but also to encourage other men around me even as I draw encouragement from them in my own struggles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's A Must Read, December 12, 2013
I loved it. There, I had to get that off of my chest. In this book, Mansfield makes a cry for men to become men. He is forthright in letting his readers know that the book is not meant as a demeaning work against women, nor is it a book for women to read. It is for men. That was a breath of fresh air. For the rest of the scoop, read through the break.

I know you should not judge a book by its cover, but after seeing the cover of this book, I knew I would have to read it. I am completely pleased that it did not disappoint.

It is one thing for an author like Mansfield to make a cry for men to man up to their responsibilities and another to give some guidance in how to do it. Thankfully, he gives us some general ideas in how to move forward to reclaim our manliness. It caused me to think about my own life and how I have slacked in some areas while focusing on some more than others.

I also appreciate the fact that Mansfield used plenty of examples, both obscure and well-known. It helped to bring each point he was making to life.

Overall I would give it five stars. That is a high-ranking and one that I do not give lightly, but if you have a male in your life, you need to give them this book for Christmas. And then, force them to read it. It doesn’t matter if they are in high school or if they’re half a century old. Each “man” could do a better job of being a Biblical man.

To be open and comply with federal regulations, I received this book in exchange for an honest and fair review from BookSneeze. My glowing review is my own and is issued with no pressure from the publisher.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Mansfield's Book of Manly Men: An Utterly Invigorating Guide to Being Your Most Masculine Self
$19.99 $15.92
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.