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Manufactured Landscapes

0 , 0  |  Unrated |  DVD
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)

List Price: $89.49
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Product Details

  • Actors: 0
  • Directors: 0
  • Format: Multiple Formats, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Zeitgeist Films
  • DVD Release Date: May 8, 2007
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000MMLOAG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #399,838 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Manufactured Landscapes" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Famed Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky travels the world observing changes in landscapes due to industrial work and manufacturing. "A disturbingly beautiful film - an experience full of aesthetic pleasures, tempered by sorrow, and the sickening recognition of our own culpability, as we see people and the earth doing their best, but ultimately failing, to cope with the larger consequences of our indulgent, oblivious, wasteful, global economy". - Film director Mark Achbar.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
Length: 2:18 Mins
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
I didn't know what to expect after the opening 8-minute tracking shot spanned a Chinese factory's considerable length. "Manufactured Landscapes" is about the work of Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky, but this film is unlike any other I've seen on the subject of an artist and his work. Burtynsky has made a name -and many beautiful photographs- in "industrial landscapes". Struck by the ways in which modern humanity has transformed Earth's landscape, he seeks out "the largest industrial incursions" he can find. His photographs are fascinating and surprisingly beautiful representations of the heart of modernization and globalization.

Director Jennifer Baichwal accompanied Burtynsky on several trips to Asia, observing the artist at work and allowing a movie camera to see the industrial landscape as he does. This gives the photographs context that they don't normally have, and Burtynsky takes the opportunity to comment in a spare narration. Baichwal wisely subscribes to the same philosophy as Burtynsky in never interpreting or demystifying the photos. I was pleasantly surprised to see how many of Burtynsky's photographs are presented in the film and amazed at how well the movie footage supports and directs the viewer into them.

After photographing extraction industries for 10 years, Burtynsky turned his attention to China, where all those materials coalesce and are turned into products we consume. We go with him as he documents the rapidly changing landscapes at a factory, a village that recycles "e-waste", a shipyard, coal mine, the incredible Three Gorges Dam, and China's fastest-growing city, Shanghai. A short trip to a shipwrecking beach in Bangladesh is particularly astonishing. "Manufactured Landscapes" showed me things I had never seen before.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Beauty of Waste July 28, 2007
Format:DVD
Jennifer Baichwal's documentary is a companion to renowned artist Edward Burtynsky's large-scale photographs depicting man's violent alteration of natural environments. Burtynsky achieved notoriety when he documented mine tailings, rail cuts, quarries and oil refineries, mostly located in North America. Baichwal shows Burtynsky at a lecture and exhibition of this material then travels to Asia with him to document the process of creating art based on China's industrial revolution. Manufactured Landscapes opens with an amazing tracking shot from the sidelines of a factory so enormous that the shot lasts eight minutes. There are stunning views of recycling yards and mountains of electronic refuse. Manufactured Landscapes takes us to the site of the Three Gorges Dam, 50% bigger than any previous such project, and to the ruins of the eleven cities that had to be demolished to make its construction possible. In Bangladesh, we witness an area that's become the final resting place for old oil tankers, which are being scrubbed clean of oil by teenagers. The central theme of Manufactured Landscapes is that the things we've come to regard as indicative of progress and human advancement have created a huge dependence on the extraction of natural resources that undermines the health of our planet and consequently our own. Beinchwal's documentary doesn't need to lecture because the visual evidence is so compelling and, ironically, so beautiful.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format:DVD
The camera is at the end of a long row of workers. It starts tracking to the next row, and the next, and the next. The camera operator's in no hurry, and as the rows continued, I became agitated. I wanted it to be over. To do something, anything, I began to count the rows. Seven minutes later --- this was surely the longest tracking shot in the history of film --- we were at the end of an enormous factory in China.

You want to see this movie --- you need to see this movie --- for many reasons, and scale is the first. We talk about global warming and environmental degradation and maybe we see a picture of an ice cap and a polar bear or a giant landfill, but we rarely see how big these things can be.

Edward Burtynsky is all about big.

He started, decades ago, by wondering what happened to the quarries that produced giant slabs of stone. What he found were excavated masterpieces --- inverted monuments, exactingly carved, extending hundreds of feet into the earth. In their way, they're gorgeous.

In the last few years, Burtynsky has moved on to China, an agrarian country transforming itself, at warp speed, into an industrial powerhouse. That means: a factory that produces 20 million flat-irons a year. The third largest aluminum recycling yard in the world. A dam so big --- the largest ever conceived, by 50% --- that 1.1 million people had to disassemble their homes and evacuate 13 villages so the thing could be built.

Many of these images show factories and apartments that are new and shiny, light years from what we think of as sweatshop workplaces and workers' housing. But don't be fooled. Much of the labor we see is so repetitive that none of us would last an hour.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A suggestion to whoever views this film May 9, 2012
By Yaduck
Format:DVD
After reading the thoughtful reviews, the only thing I would like to add is to whoever views this fine film should take an extra few minutes and watch the "extra features". There is a commentary by the artist offering his views on the accelerated growth of the city of Shanghai. His observations on the future of this Chinese city is fascinating and horrifying. It is a "must see", in my humble opinion.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Thought provoking!
Published 14 days ago by Kurt Nelson
5.0 out of 5 stars Eye opening documentary!
Showing how we are each part of the problem, we can only hope that the damage halts and reverses. Although we all are to blame, the Chinese government is just awful.
Published 16 days ago by john kennedy
5.0 out of 5 stars the only movie i've ever purchased. everyone should watch it.
from the factory in china to the recycling center. from the shipyard to shipbreaking beach. china, bangladesh, the 3 gorges dam. very interesting and insightful. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Noel Allen
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorites. Just see for yourself.
"I think rather than present it as a polemic between right and wrong, I like the open ended nature that allows these photos to become discussion points. Read more
Published 7 months ago by C. Telenko
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent film introduction to the human and environmental impact of...
This is not an Academy Award-winning film, nor will it keep you on the edge of your seat with suspense or fear. Read more
Published 7 months ago by Rama
1.0 out of 5 stars Meh.
Visually interesting, but really felt it was more oriented to serving the director's ego than it was to making a political statement.
Published 8 months ago by Morgan
4.0 out of 5 stars Stark realism- epic photography- a real message for all
Very insightful, well directed and phtotgraphed documentary highlights some of the positives and negatives of the our "progressive" society-and the price that Mother... Read more
Published 15 months ago by Bourne415
5.0 out of 5 stars love it
Burtynsky does an excellent job of bringing you a whole new look at our world today.

The images are beyond the imagination and I love the fact that he narrated the video... Read more
Published 15 months ago by photo_tina
3.0 out of 5 stars China Development
Seems to be more of a propaganda film. I was looking for more of a film on buildings and manufacturing. I know China rashes their country but it's their problem not mine.
Published 16 months ago by James, JingMu
5.0 out of 5 stars Watch if you dare.
Educate yourself and watch this. Sometimes I felt that the filmmaker kept his camera on a scene a little too long, but, know what? We deserve it.
Published 16 months ago by Carol G. Nix
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