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Manufacturing Victims: What the Psychology Industry Is Doing to People Paperback – February 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 420 pages
  • Publisher: Robert Davies Pub; 1552070328 edition (February 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1552070123
  • ISBN-13: 978-1552070123
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,036,836 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

...argues that psychology has changed from a respectable academic discipline into an industry eager to sell its products... -- The Mail on Sunday (London)

Renegade psychologist dukes it out with feelings folks. -- Mark Sauer, San Diego Union-Tribune

Tana Dineen...arguably the planet's preeminent psychotherapy critic. -- Michael Roberts, Denver Westword

Tana Dineen...the woman who put psychology on the couch. -- Lynn McAuley, Ottawa Citizen

This gun is not for hire! Clinician slams the expert-witness racket. -- LA Daily Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

A former practicing psychologist and director of a psychiatric hospital in Canada, Tana Dineen holds both a Master's and Ph.D in Psychology.

After a long career in the field, Dr Dineen came to the conclusion that psychology, originally a science dedicated to the curing of serious pathology, has become diluted into what is now a broad range of pseudo-science and pseudo-therapy. Patients with little seriously wrong are offered therapy which is often of unproven value and kept on a payment string for as long as possible, focusing on what the therapist claims is wrong with them rather than what is right with them. From th adage of a cure for every ill, we have arrived at an ill for every cure and the ever-increasing use of psychology of little probatgive value in legal cases which often were no more based on scientific logic than the witch trials of centuries past became too much for Dr Dineen to stand. No longer believing psychology could reform itself from the inside, she left clinical practice and now runs a B&B in Victoria, British Columbia. She also writes several columns each month on various topics for Canadian newspapers. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 68 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 4, 1998
Dr. Dineen is certainly right when she attacks the many sloppy and poorly trained therapists in the world today. Psychology has become the new religion, and like all religions it has spawned a disturbing assortment of irrational cults. Foremost among them is "trauma theory"--the dogma that virtually all psychological problems stem from abuse and neglect in early childhood. The patient must, it follows, learn to hate the abusive parents and blame every disappointment and failure in life on them. What is not blamed on parents is blamed on "society" in general and on relatively trivial day to day traumas like finding a bug in your food, getting into a shouting match with your lover or having your purse snatched. The author is absolutely correct that there is no evidence that childhood experiences determine adult behavior, and that there are many people who have experienced far worse traumas than middle class Westerners could ever imagine and show no signs of psychopathology. Obviosly there is no need to bring everyone into the mental health system. There are those who need care and those who don't. Dineen exposes a virtual conspiracy among some mental health care providers to make everyone a patient and label everyone in society as fundamentally weak and flawed. Needless to say, I appreciated many aspects of this book. But before I sign off, I must complain about a few things. Dr. Dineen is great at criticizing the quack theories and fuzzy thinking others, but offers few suggestions about helping those who actually have mental illnesses. At times, she seems to shrug the whole issue off. It is clear from the book that she does not take the approach of Thomas Szasz and deny that mental illness exists.Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Arch on June 24, 2007
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Anyone who is a psychologist should read this. Tana is so sensible and so right. Readers who like this book will also enjoy 'Destructive trends in mental health.' The profession of psychology needs to take a close look at itself.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 27, 1998
Make certain to read this book -- it injects a healthy dose of reality into the popular view of psychology. It also points out the many angles from which psychology bombards the average consumer. The necessity for psychology is ingrained in Americans, and for a person to reject its "truths" is so shocking, we must conclude that the person is in denial.
Note to the editors: the past tense of "LEAD a horse to water" is "LED a horse to water."
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5 of 105 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 18, 1999
<And when I recently read that 400,000 American children are on Prozac, and that the company has requested permission to market coloured and flavoured Prozac pills (=candy) for children> Yup, those darn sickos at Lilly! I don't know where you got your info, but it's pretty doubtful that Lilly would apply for this since they've only done clinical tests on patients 18 or over. Also, I happen to know an expert in adolescent psychiatry and he says Prozac could actually have the opposite effect on pre-teens.
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