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Map Across Time:Gates of Heaven Series (The Gates of Heaven Series) Paperback – Bargain Price, March 4, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: The Gates of Heaven Series (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: AMG Publishers (March 4, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0899578896
  • ASIN: B005M4DYPW
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.8 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,768,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this second book in the Gates of Heaven series, Lakin (Someone to Blame) spins a tale of twins, a prince and a princess, who must travel through time to undo the curse that threatens their father's kingdom. On its surface a Christian work, using Old Testament quotes and Hebrew words spontaneously uttered in dialogue and exploring themes of healing, sacred places, and the struggle between good and evil, the novel owes more to classic fairy tales than to religious allegory. As in many fairy tales, the characters are flat, existing mostly as types—the beautiful princess, the wise nursemaid, the friendly talking animal—rather than complex human beings. The writing similarly lacks nuance at times; though Lakin is an effective storyteller, her prose often veers into cliché when tackling the story's ambitious themes. Despite flaws, the novel is fast-paced and tightly plotted, which means that the reader will quickly be drawn into the complex twists and turns of the story and, in fairy tale tradition, led toward a surprising yet satisfying conclusion. (Mar.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

C. S. Lakin lives in the otherworldly kingdom of California, in a forest that resembles Tebron. In addition to the many fairy tales she writes, she also forays into the real world with her many psychological mysteries. Her novel Someone to Blame (winner of the 2009 Zondervan novel contest) released October 2010. When she is not writing, she works professionally as a book copyeditor and writing coach. She has two amazing daughters, a dedicated and encouraging husband, a demanding but lovable black lab pup, and three persnickety but irresistible cats. Whenever possible, she disappears for days atop mountain peaks or explores the ocean sixty feet below the surface. The rest of her life is spent between sea and sky waiting for a city not made by human hands.

More About the Author

C. S. Lakin is an award-winning novelist, writing instructor, and professional copyeditor who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. Lakin's award-winning blog for writers: www.livewritethrive.com provides deep writing instruction and posts on industry trends. Her site www.CritiqueMyManuscript.com features her critique services. She teaches workshops and critiques at writing conferences and workshops around the country.

The first six books in her seven-book fantasy series, The Gates of Heaven, are out in print and ebook, allegorical fairy tales drawing from classic tales we all read in our childhood.

Lakin's relational drama/mystery, Someone to Blame, won the 2009 Zondervan First Novel award, released October 2010. Her other suspense/mysteries are Innocent Little Crimes (top 100 in the 2009 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Contest), A Thin Film of Lies, and Conundrum. And sci-fi enthusiasts will love Time Sniffers: a wild young adult romance that will entangle you in time!

She also publishes writing craft books in the series The Writer's Toolbox, which help novelists learn how to write great books!

Follow her on Twitter: @cslakin and @livewritethrive and like her Facebook Author Page: http://www.facebook.com/C.S.Lakin.Author

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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The Map Across Time is the story of twins, Adin and Aletha.
Amazon Customer
I highly recommend this book; adults (the intended audience) and teens will enjoy reading it, and younger children will enjoy having someone older read it with them.
D. Williams
It is a story of good versus evil, but it is definitely a fresh tale with some very cool twists.
Favorite Christian Books

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. Williams VINE VOICE on March 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
Adin and Aletha, fraternal twins, are the prince and princess of Sherborne. They face the death of their mother, the queen, when they are about ten years old, and then the downward spiral of their father. With a king goes a country, so Sherborne falls into serious problems as well. The twins, as they become young adults, learn details about their mother's death and their father's problems and learn of a very special map that guides one through time, not simply place. They use this map to save their father and their country, traveling in time to do this.

This fairy tale does cite the Bible frequently; many of the quotations and paraphrases are from the Old Testament (Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes), with a sprinkling from the New Testament. These citations are blended in very seamlessly and artfully; readers do not feel as if they're being preached to. The author also uses a language called Law'az, with definitions in a glossary in the back matter and an explanation that it is a derivation of ancient Hebrew.

I highly recommend this book; adults (the intended audience) and teens will enjoy reading it, and younger children will enjoy having someone older read it with them.
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Format: Paperback
The story of the birth was told time and time again, but was so mystical that no embellishment could improve upon the truth. Aletha's little body began to descend through the queen's birth canal. Reya, who would later tend to her, watched the child as she came out feet first, but then was puzzled when she suddenly stopped. It was a mystery because the child held tight to something and wouldn't let go. What was the babe grasping? The queen began to howl and push once again. The yo'shana was quickly solved when Aletha quickly started to move and pulled her twin, Adin, into the world clasping his wee hands in hers. The princess was beautiful, but her twin was weak with twisted features and legs. The King would later humiliate him by saying he was nothing more than a "misshapen disgrace of a son."

Ten-year-old Aletha would later think that "All her life she had been watching over Adin for as long as she could remember," but wa simply love that bound them. The King, on the other hand, marveled at the beauty of his daughter and shunned her twin. He had "steadily fallen apart" over the years with greed and insanity quickly overtaking his mind. The Queen lay dying and the twins had little time left to be with their mother who loved them equally. She struggled to give them each a silver locket engraved with the law'az an ancient language that could no longer be deciphered in their land, save for a few words. "Ahabah 'az maveth" were her final words. Reya started as she knew what they meant ... "Love is as strong as death."

There had been a qa'lal placed on Sherbourne, a curse that would continue until everything was destroyed. The King would later believe the prince, a boy who would do anything to gain his love, was plotting against his very life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kara Grant on February 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
The Map Across Time by C.S. Lakin
Review by Kara Grant

An ancient curse plagues the kingdom of Sherbourne, and unless it is stopped, all will fall to ruin. The King, obsessed with greed, cannot see the danger. But his teenage twin children, Aletha and Adin, know they must act. A hermit leads Adin to a magical map that will send him back in time to discover the origin of the curse. Once back, Adin must find the Keeper, who protects the Gate of Heaven, but all he has is a symbol as a clue to guide him. Unbeknown to Adin, Aletha follows her brother, but they both arrive in Sherbourne's past at the precipice of a great war, and there is little time to discover how to counteract the curse.

One unexpected disaster after another forces the twins to make difficult choices. Adin's only hope to correct the past is to return to the future to manipulate events so his quest can succeed. Through his trials and failures, Adin learns that nothing can stop heaven from accomplishing its goal, and that all events work for the good of those who trust heaven. An epic fairy tale with surprising twists, embracing the enduring power of love and faith (from Christianbook.com and back cover).

[...] please see page 36 of this magazine for a 5 question interview with C.S. Lakin in the Feb/March 2012 issue

My review: When the story begins Adin and Aletha's mother, the queen of Sherbourne, is dying. Since this book is all about the twins and their journeys, we know nothing about the queen yet I was touched by her death and it leads to profound consequences in the plot. The first thing I noticed was that Adin and Aletha are very close and every decision they make is to protect one another as well as their kingdom.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on February 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed the first book in C.S. Lakin's Gates of Heaven Series, The Wolf of Tebron . I'd read Grace Bridges' review and it sounded like something right up my alley--"a fairy tale for adults." It's a great story.

I liked The Map Across Time even better, though!

The Gates of Heaven series isn't a real series in that the books can be read out of order. They take place in the same world, but aren't necessarily chronological.

The Map Across Time is the story of twins, Adin and Aletha. Their mother the queen is deathly ill. Their father the king is suffering the effects of the curse that has invaded their land. Their future is doomed until Adin stumbles across a talking pig who brings him to a hermit's house. And the hermit leads Adin to a map that will take him back in time, where Adin must find the cause of the curse and its cure.

The concept is simple. The execution is not. The story is complex, and rich, and twisty is such a lovely way! Time travel is one of those concepts that makes my brain feel as if it's being pinched. I just can't wrap my mind around the paradox. Lakin, though, laid out a story that wove the crossed-over timeline perfectly. Brilliant.

The only--and I mean only--thing that bothered me was the use of the "old language." Where words in italics were thrown in here and there, words that all seemed to have randomly placed apostrophes. I doubt this will bother most people, but it is a pet peeve of mine. I will say that their use thinned out as the book went on, and it never once got even close to bugging me enough to make me stop reading. Every ounce of the rest of the book was enjoyable. And the use of the old language was actually integral to the plot!

I highly recommend the book for fantasy and fairy tale fans.
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