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Marble City: Photographic Tour Hardcover – May 21, 1999


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 88 pages
  • Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press; 1st edition (May 21, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1572330430
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572330436
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,217,803 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

<br><strong><a href=http://utpress.org/utpressblog/><img src=http://utpress.org/images/events.gif border=0></a></strong><br>
Conceived in 1853 as a canny real-estate scheme by two young investors expecting to get rich off the idea, Market Square came to be Knoxville’s most public spot, a marketplace familiar to every man, woman, and child in the area. By the 1860s, it was the busiest place in a burgeoning city, a place to shop, work, play, eat, drink, and live. In a town that became bitterly divided by politics, race, and background, Market Square became a rare common ground: a place to buy all sorts of local produce, but also a place to experience new things, including the grandiose Market House itself, considered a model in a progressive era.
 
Beset by urban blight by the mid-1900s, Market Square had become more of a curiosity than a point of municipal pride, and the neighborhood declined. After years of fevered controversy, the city razed the Market House and struggled to modernize the old Square itself. Through a combination of public and private efforts in the 21st century, Market Square seems to be returning to its original diverse spirit.

Market Square details the colorful history of this wonderfully eccentric place, a place that is once again familiar to the whole community, suggesting why, on a good day, Market Square can resemble—as a reporter described it in 1900—“the most democratic place on earth.”

Jack Neely is the award-winning Secret History columnist for Metro Pulse, Knoxville’s weekly newspaper. He is the author of <i>From the Shadow Side and Other Stories about Knoxville, Tennessee</i>, and, with Aaron Jay, of <i>The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville’s Graveyards</i>.

About the Author

Jack Neely is the award-winning Secret History columnist for Metro Pulse, Knoxville’s weekly newspaper. He is the author of <i>From the Shadow Side and Other Stories about Knoxville, Tennessee</i>, and, with Aaron Jay, of <i>The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville’s Graveyards</i>.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a regular reader of "Colonel" Jack Neely in MetroPulse (Knoxville's alternative newspaper) and one who appreciated his previous volumes, Knoxville's Secret History I and II, I eagerly awaited this book. If you are interested in East Tennessee history and the people who made it--"Parson" Brownlow, Paul Y. Anderson, Lloyd Branson, the McClungs, General William Caswell, Joseph Mabry, Captain William Rule, Thomas O'Conner, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Edward T. Sanford, Calvin Johnson, the Bethel Cemetery, blues singer and composer Ida Cox, James Agee's father, Frances Hodgson Burnett's mother and many others--you need this book. Many of the gravesites are in Knoxville's Old Gray Cemetery. Take this book and visit the cemetery and revisit East Tennessee History and those who made it. The photographs are also outstanding! Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jack E. Rouse on October 31, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating book, even if the reader is not from the Knoxville area. Packed full of interesting and personal historical information, it is well-written, and the black and white photographs are "museum quality." Many of the people buried in the cemetery were prominent and will be recognized by those interested in 19th and early 20th century history. In addition, the photographs showcase the art form of memorials in the "golden era" of stonework. The book was advertised as "New," and it arrived in new condition - well packaged and in the original clear plastic wrapping. I purchased the book on Amazon, and the price was among the lowest listed.
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3 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 26, 1999
Format: Paperback
Another excellent work by Jack Neely
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