Customer Reviews

67
3.6 out of 5 stars
Marcy Cardio Mini Cycle
Color: GreySize: OSChange
Price:$59.99 + Free shipping
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on January 16, 2012
So, this item is what it says .... no more, no less. The real issue is that it "crawls" while you are using it. Because it is so light, it moves while you are pedalling which is extrememly annoying. Other than that, it is OK for the price.
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69 of 78 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2011
I bought this unit because i like the fully enclosed units. I was disappointed the blonde in the pictures doesn't come with it, but that's no fault of the product.

Assembly is quick; you screw the legs on with 4 screws, 2 each leg. You screw the pedals on and you are done. you can use the supplied 2 in 1 tool to accomplish the assembly task. I would recommend you use a bit of threadlocker on the screws of the legs so you will never worry about it getting loose.

The digital counter is a fun addition, it can count the number of rotations, or estimate calories burned.

The resistance knob works on my unit.

Protip: use this cycle on a carpeted area to keep it from sliding out of reach.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
I did some research before purchasing one of these bikes, unfortunately my boss decided not to allow me to keep it at work, but it will still be nice for days when I am snowed in or otherwise restless but need to get something done at my computer.

Pros-
This machine makes hardly any noise, would not be distracting to others or keep you from concentrating on a task. Most full sized stationary bikes are very loud, so that was a big concern for me.

The machine is sturdy enough and outfitted with little foam bits so that it doesn't move around on the floor as you peddle, I've seen reviews that say other machines do this

My leg muscles are fairly in shape but after awhile I can feel a bit of tension from my leg muscles being worked.

Comes with a timer that will tell you how long you peddled, how many "revolutions" and allegedly how many calories this burned- in the one day I took it to work I allegedly burned around 200 calories. Obviously this varies hugely from person to person but the timer is useful.

Cons-

This item comes with little tools and must be assembled. It wasn't difficult, but I don't see why it couldn't have come in a slightly larger box and been pre-assembled so there's less chance of the person assembling it breaking something.

Definitely not a substitute for a real workout- think of it as a way to add more activity at times when you are unable to fit in a real workout or must be doing something else. I was hoping to use it at work as I get physically restless and work in a call center.

This unit is a bit heavy and bulky. I'm 5'8" and was just able to use it under my desk without hitting the top. If you are taller, this may not be a good purchase for you.

The pedals are not very large. I have a size 10.5 ladies' foot- about 26.5 centimeters long. I was able to peddle in these wearing shoes, but it is easiest in socks. There's still a definite chance your feet will slip off the pedals, though. You have to kind of get the knack of it, it's not like peddling a stationary bike. Again, taller people may not be happy with this unit.

I haven't really attempted to use the tension settings much, so I can't speak to that. It's worth the $40, but I think if you have the budget for a stationary bike or the ability to easily maintain a gym membership both would be a better option for those seriously looking to get into shape. This is more of a fidget toy.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
I really enjoy working out with the Marcy Mini Cycle! I usually do about 1 hour with my arms and YES I get a real good sweat going!! I will do another 45 minutes with my legs and yes I keep sweating!! Yes I can feel the burn! This is a really good piece of exercise equipment for the money! I would highly recommend!!!!!!!!!
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36 of 45 people found the following review helpful
on December 3, 2011
Just received it. Solid machine. Easy to put together. The tension knob doesn't seem to be working. I wrote customer service to see if there is a trick to it. If there is I will post. Until then I will give a 3. If a resolution is provided I will raise the rating. Added comments - I called the company to advise when I turned the tension knob something snapped so the tension would not change. Their very unhelpful suggestion was to take the unit apart to determine if I could see what snapped. I, instead, returned the unit. Giving the benefit of the doubt I asked for a replacement which I just received. There was no snap when I turned the tension knob but turning it either way did not change anything. Whatever the tension is is what it will be. In my case, practically nothing. This machine is good for anyone just wanting to increase circulation not for actual exercise. Because there is no tension you will have to triple (at least) the time you planned to spend on it. To be fair, while looking into which mini cycle I would buy comments about tension problems were noted for many of them. It seems to be a common problem. For the solid design, ease of putting together and the fact it doesn't move across the floor when pedaling, I will keep the rating at a 3.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2012
I am still in early stages of quitting smoking...7 wks...bought this to burn some calories as I've heard metabolism slows when quit smoking. Not good! So, for these few "bucks" I am burnin' some calories!!! Yeah! I love it! I just turn my 'puter chair and aim it at the thing facing TV and it works for me. My neighbor lost 65 pounds doing this...mind you we are both Seniors! I am not overweight (yet), but do not want to be...so Thanx! Karen
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 5, 2014
Its torque resistance adjustment works via friction, not magnetism. The hand-knob bolt pushes against a rocker arm that tensions a friction BAND that wraps around a cast iron flatbelt pulley. This is a vastly superior design compared to the axle pressure method of friction utilized on a number of cheaper portable cyclers, such as the popular Drive Medical Deluxe Folding Exercise Peddler with Electronic Display , Black (which I also own). That other (inferior) method produces a far lesser maximum torque resistance, with a FAR greater generation of heat, which according to user reviews COOKS the crank axle bushings. However, this machine generates heat too; after my usual 12-sprint interval session, the cranks became luke warm to the touch. But most of that heat is undoubtedly due to the ABSENCE of ball bearings for the crank axle...

On the downside, its crank axle is attended by two pairs of cheap half-bushings molded of nylon plastic. It's not difficult to imagine that those bushings will begin degrading due to frictional heat generation after only 15+ minutes of continuous usage. That's part of the reason why I limit my workout sessions on the machine to just 10 minutes maximum. Worse, each half-bushing is fastened to the 3/32" thick frame with two small machine screws. With such minimal thread engagement, you shouldn't torque those fasteners with anything other than a nut driver. Otherwise, you could strip the threads in the frame. So that presents another problem: Since the half-bushings cannot be tightly fastened to the machine, they quickly drift apart, which causes play with the axle. I've observed that after snugging the half-bushings together, only 6 mins of maximum speed activity caused noticable play between the axle and bushings. That play could be heard as a knocking sound, and felt by wiggling the crank. If ignored, the result would be rapid wear of the bushings as a slotted hole. I solved that problem by installing a 1" dia by 5/16" wide hose clamp around both pairs of half-bushings. Each of the two hose clamps just barely clears the revolving screw heads on the flat belt pulley. Now the half-bushings stay together in good contact with the axle-- and hopefully last longer.

The pedals double as handles. Each has two open ball bearing units. Packing them with grease is difficult and impractical. So lubricate them with a light oil suitable for ball bearings using a dispenser with a long narrow nozzle, such as Lucas Oil Products 10216 Air Tool Lubricant. 16 oz..

Now during operation the only sound source from the machine is the friction strap rubbing on its pulley; a dull hiss like that of air being deflated from a bicycle tire.

As a leg bike, I have found that it is NOT useful for either cardio-respiratory fitness or calorie burning. It cannot possibly function as a fitness machine when operated by the LEGS. It's grossly unsuitable for that purpose. This is partly because its motion circle is only 8" diameter (compared to 12.5" for a typical inexpensive recumbent bike), and its maximum torque resistance is practically undetectable by a normal individual's thigh muscles. However, if the intended use is mild gentle therapy for blood circulation or range of motion, then it could function OK, albeit BRIEFLY, considering its cheap crank axle bushings. People who could use it for very gentle rehab therapy might be those who are recovering from a broken ankle/leg, or a hip/knee replacement, heart surgery, lymphodema, diabetic leg swelling, etc.. They would be expected to use it for several weeks and then throw it away.

Note that for leg cycling, when the resistance is set near its maximum resistance (at one full turn of the hand-knob back from maximum), the machine tends to wander about the floor (either hard flooring or carpeting). The solution is to butt its farthest cross-member up against the room wall's baseboard trim. That traps the machine in place. However, if the resistance is adjusted to a very low level, then the machine can stay put while being pedaled with the feet without need for being butted against something.

It works far better as an ARM bike. If you place it on a kitchen counter top or on top of a very heavy, rigid table, then you can sit in front of it and cycle away as fast as you can with torque resistance set to maximum, and it will stay put. The reason why the machine doesn't crawl about while you work it via your arms is because while one arm pushes, the other arm pulls, thereby equalizing the forces and stabilizing its position. I placed it on the top of our staircase, knelt onto a cushion placed 3 stair-steps below, and then did 12 x 30-sec SPRINT INTERVALS via my arms, alternated with very slow 20-sec active recoveries. Not only did I work up a SLIGHT sweat, but it caused my tricep muscles to fatigue considerably, despite regular weight lifting at my local gym. Moreover, the entire 9:40 session raised my HR to 154 bpm peak and 131 bpm avg.

I've since discovered that when the machine is atop of our top-loading laundry washer the arm cycling ergonomics are improved enough to enable work in the reverse direction of rotation. So now I alternate my arm sprint intervals in order to spread the burden more evenly on the muscle groups.

Although its handle centers revolve about a diameter of only 8", I discovered how to exercise my entire 23" reach with this machine. Using only a braided nylon cord (1/8" dia x 60" len) I hung the machine from two corners of a bathroom door. Then, after latching the door shut I varied my arm cycle intervals via 3 different torso distances from the machine: close, mid-range, and maximum. Maximum speed from a standing position was challenging, and could thus be useful for training boxers and mixed martial artists.

Anyone who is interested in doing 1-3 mins of arm warmup exercise just prior to a heavy weight lifting session should consider getting one of these Marcy NS-909 machines. It's worth it just for that purpose, as it could help prevent an injury. I've suffered from elbow tendonitis and from shoulder impingements, so you can understand my special interest in this machine.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on April 1, 2012
As the other reviews mentioned, I found the unit tended to creep while I used it. I also had trouble with the tension knob and heard something snap the first time I tightened it. I have no idea if the knob works now or not--I can't feel a difference when I turn it.

The unit comes with no instructions, so I guess what the display means. Additionally, the same numbers re-appear on the display after I've cleared it, so it's probably broken.

The main flaw I found is the design of the peddles: the bolt through each peddle turns independently, so they're a pain to screw in. And the wafer-thin "wrench" included is no help at all. As I got the peddle bolts nearly tightened, the "wrench"gaped and wouldn't hold tight to the bolts. The space between the shaft and the peddle is skinny, so using a regular crescent wrench is also a no-go.

One peddle loosened and came out after moderate use, stripping the threads on the shaft and making it impossible to replace the peddle. So now I have to buy an entire new unit and scrap this one.

I'm not impressed with this brand.
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on September 30, 2012
We bought this with a 78 year old in mind. We haven't set it up for her yet, so we don't know how practical it will be yet.

We did find that the resistance varied quite a bit within each turn of the crank. With the way the load varied, one leg (or arm) would have gotten much more resistance than the other. I found it very annoying to try and use the cycle with such a large change in load. It felt like I was trying to pedal a bicycle with one foot.

Rather than return it, we took it apart to see if the problem could be corrected easily. The resistance mechanism consists of a belt wrapped around a flywheel. The knob adjusts the tension on the belt to vary the resistance. The resistance was varying because the flywheel was not rotating about its center. Which basically means the belt would tighten and loosen with each rotation of the wheel. If the manufacturer were using properly designed tooling to locate the mounting holes at the center of the flywheel, this could easily have been prevented.

We removed the flywheel, drilled out the mounting holes on the crank, reinstalled the flywheel and then manually centered the flywheel on the crank. Now the cycle has a constant resistance and feels much better.

I'm not sure I really expected more for the price, but I am disappointed to see this sort of a problem that probably would have cost less than a penny per unit to prevent.

Now for the next step....

Hopefully our 78 year old will be comfortable using it while watching TV.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 2, 2013
so far its doing what it suppose to. I use it in 20 minute intervals and i break a sweat. i'm using as an upper body machine i have it on one of those folding individual tables i just hope that its high enough to get the job done
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