Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth (Pelican) Paperback – January 1, 1986


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$61.28 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Pelican
  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (January 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140225552
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140225556
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,637,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 32 people found the following review helpful By George Kocan on April 25, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The is a most important book because it sets the record straign about Margaret Mead. Her book on Samoa created a false understanding of primitive peoples. She went to Samoa to do her PhD dissertation and came back with a myth that supported the prejudices and biases of her graduate advisor, Franz Boas. She purportedly discovered that the Samoans were the personification of Jean Jacque Roussoue's "Noble Savage." There were unspoiled by the vices of Western Civilization. The biggest vice was supposedly the West's repressive sexuality that gave rise to social aggression of various kinds. Derek Freeman blows all of this out of the water. He points out among other things that Mean did not know the language and stayed there only a few weeks. This does not come up to the standards of methodology that anthropologists have come to accept to accurately understand and describe a culture.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Robert Vance Rose on January 2, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Freeman's classic has revolutionized our conception of anthropology, and thrown this field, and others, into complete confusion on university campuses throughout the world.

Mead had a fantastically large influence on the thought of the 20th century, and it has been horribly misleading. The real origin of this ridiculous view of humanity was written about 1750 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his most influential "Emile, or on Education". In this absurd invitation to Utopia, Rousseau, father of modern socialist and collectivist idealogy, postulated that "love", or humanistic altuism, is the only natural instinct in the human species. Any other emotional drive is antithetical to social progress, and has been caused by the nefarious influence of "bourgeois" values. (See Bloom's recent translation of Rousseau)

Believe that, and I will sell you a large and famous bridge at an unbelievable price!

God bless Derek Freeman! Maybe some day our world will recover from Mead and from Rousseau!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 13 people found the following review helpful By land lover on November 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
Derek Freeman's vicious critique of Mead's book was declared by the American Anthropological Society to be "unprofessional" and simply not a scholarly work. Better to see Shankman's writing on Mead, his articles and books, which offer a more unbiased treatment of the issues.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Frequently Bought Together

Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth (Pelican) + Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilisation (Perennial Classics)
Buy the selected items together