Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $6.49 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Margaret Mitchell's Gone ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: :
Comment: Ships within 24 business hours.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood Hardcover – February 16, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1589795679 ISBN-10: 9781589795679 Edition: First Edition

Buy New
Price: $20.46
27 New from $9.00 28 Used from $2.50 3 Collectible from $35.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.46
$9.00 $2.50
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$20.46 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood + The Making of a Legend: Gone with the Wind
Price for both: $28.61

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing; First Edition edition (February 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781589795679
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589795679
  • ASIN: 1589795679
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,031,932 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Timed to coincide with the 75th anniversary of the landmark film, this volume charts Mitchell's course from unpublished author to enduring, international success. Brown, a rare book dealer, and Wiley, who has for 25 years published a quarterly Gone With the Wind newsletter, set aside exegesis in favor of the lesser-known "insider" look at one of publishing's benchmark phenomenon, the book industry during the '30s and '40s, the toll that fame exacted upon Mitchell and her husband John Marsh, as well as the challenges of building and preserving a legacy. Featuring key players in Mitchell's story—including her brother and lawyer Stephen Mitchell, friends Lois Cole and Allan Taylor, Macmillan editors, producer David O. Selznick, and others—the authors expertly turn even the most technical subjects into an adventure. Whether contending with onerous contracts, copyright infringements, unauthorized editions, betrayals, and other problems stemming from sudden acclaim, Mitchell remained grounded in principles, responding with grace and a firm insistence on accuracy. She is revealed here as a most humane figure in a sobering, affective examination of celebrity that is also a testament to perseverance. Photos. (Feb.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review

Oh my goodness what a beautiful book! I started reading and couldn’t put it down last night, turned off the light close to 1am. A real winner. (executive producer of Georgia Public Broadcasting's documentary, Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel)

In a narrative as engaging and well-paced as that of Gone With the Wind itself, Brown and Wiley chronicle the journey of the story that captured the world’s imagination and the woman whose tireless efforts changed the way books are made, sold, and read. This is a celebration of the unique power great books have to shelter, heal, and unite us and it is a must-read for anyone who has wondered what life is like for the artists whose work changes our lives. (Rebecca Joines Schinsky The Book Lady's Blog)

History is one of my loves and any book that delves into the hidden, behind-the-scenes stories of great events fascinates me. Ellen Brown and John Wiley have written just such a book, explaining the untold story of Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind. This is a must read for any aficionado of this classic in American literature. (Steve Berry, New York Times bestselling author)

Who would have thought that reading a book about the writing of Gone With the Wind could be almost as riveting as the real thing? In this deep examination of the life and times of GWTW, Brown and Wiley have inked a masterwork of their own. Booklovers of all stripes—not just those who bleed scarlet when pricked—will be enthralled by this story of one of the great literary successes of modern times. (Dean King, author of Skeletons on the Zahara and Unbound)

...[T]he story behind the story is the riveting equivalent of a literary thriller. (Style Weekly)

Entertaining and thoroughly researched, Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind provides fascinating new insights into the woman who created one of the world's most famous and enduring couples. (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Amazingly, Brown and Wiley have written a book about a novel that...reads like a novel. (Boomer Magazine)

With such comprehensive research and dynamic writing, this book is certain to appeal to a wide audience of literary, history, and film buffs. (Fine Books & Collections)

...[R]eads like an intriguing international mystery. Granted unprecedented access to records and correspondence about the book’s publishing, movie that followed and legacy that remains, the authors reveal the whole saga—worthy of a fainting spell from Scarlett herself. (Deep South Magazine)

[Brown and Wiley] tell a new version of events and give a fuller picture of the phenomenon than anyone before. (River City Fiction blog)

A must-read for aficionados, Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind is engaging history—and a powerful testament to the plucky Georgian who birthed her fictional baby and then, with dignity and grace, protected that child from tasteless, dishonest and unworthy assaults. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

...[T]he authors expertly turn even the most technical subjects into an adventure. (Publishers Weekly)

Immaculately researched and addictively readable...a fascinating read for both casual and fervent fans alike. (Gone With the Wind Scrapbook)

Who would image that a book about the publication history of a novel would be so fascinating? (Author Magazine)

A beat up manuscript that was viewed as unfinished quickly became a cultural icon. Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood tells the story of both Gone with the Wind and its author Margaret Mitchell. An enigma of her contemporaries, people for years have wondered how the novel came into being and how it cached on so hotly, as well as what was the intent of the author during the story's dramatic almost cliffhanger ending. A fascinating exploration of literature, culture, and film, Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood is a fine read and highly recommended. (Midwest Book Review)

Fans of GWTW will surely enjoy this new book, but anyone with an interest in writing, publishing, or bookselling will find something to appreciate in this look inside the industry. Mitchell's book had quite a life of its own and reading about it from conception to publishing phenomenon to international copyright horror is endlessly fascinating. Margaret Mitchell alone imbues the book with such a charming and vivacious spirit I felt I couldn't get enough of her. (Cavalier House Books, Denham Springs, LA)

...[W]ill fascinate not only fans of the book and movie, but anyone interested in literary/filmmaking development. (Las Vegas Review Journal)

Learning more about how this fascinating book came into being and how it still stands up to today's reading demands is a captivating subject, and Brown and Wiley do an admirable job shining light on the process. (Ventura County Star)

[W]ill enthrall the general reader as well as the wannabe author. (StarNews)

A fascinating exploration of literature, culture, and film, 'Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood' is a fine read and highly recommended. (Midwest Book Review)

People with an interest in Gone With the Wind and the publishing business in general will find much to fascinate in this captivating history of the Gone With the Wind empire. Highly recommended. (Devourer of Books blog)

Brown and Wiley give Mitchell’s monumental novel its due here. Drawing on meticulous research and unprecedented access to private papers, they follow Gone With the Wind from the glimmer of an idea to explosion as a global bestseller, hugely popular film, and subject of heated copyright battles. This is a vivid, highly readable account of the life of a story—and, incidentally, of its spirited, scrappy author. It is also a remarkable contribution to publishing history and literary studies. (Susann Cokal, Author of Mirabilis and Breath and Bones)

Any novice writer who aspires to pen a phenomenally successful novel will come away wide-eyed from this detailed and well-documented account of the creation, publication, and ongoing product management of Margaret Mitchell’s famous novel of the Civil War South, which celebrates its 75th anniversary this year. Freelance author Brown and Gone With the Wind collector Wiley take readers on the journey from Mitchell’s typewriter to Hollywood, showing how much care is required to maintain legal rights when it comes to publication, movie production, and merchandising, not to mention the 1930s price wars between drugstore book racks and traditional bookstores. The authors show the genesis of the novel itself, which Mitchell started as a way to fill time as she recuperated from an ankle injury. Once she completed the manuscript, prepublication interest grew. Before long, she found herself coping with fan mail and autograph seekers. The book concludes with current efforts by Mitchell’s estate to uphold the copyright, which expires in 2031. VERDICT This will appeal to all fans of the book or the film, as well as popular literary history buffs and writers. (Library Journal)

[A] fascinating perspective on the life of a tremendously successful book...

Customer Reviews

Their book was a pleasure to read.
Jill Meyer
Margaret Mitchell's Gone With The Wind, by Ellen F. Brown & John Wiley documents the journey of one of the most loved & famous novels in history.
cat
Not one of these real-life characters seems very likeable.
IsolaBlue

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By R. P. Ewing on January 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am not a hardcore GWTW fan, nor a lover of biographies or history for that matter. That being said, Bestseller's Odyssey was a great read and I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the life and times of Margaret Mitchell's great work. I received an advance copy of Bestseller's Odyssey with few preconceptions and so was not surprised to discover how little I understood of the publishing industry. What I was not expecting was to be so intrigued by the nature and number of legal hurdles which Mitchell and her work overcame. Extending far beyond its initial print publication, this book details all those who shaped the ultimate path of Gone with the Wind.

Despite my original ambivalence (apologies all) towards GWTW, I found myself rooting for Mitchell as she struggled to protect her work and maintain her principled stance. My appreciation for Mitchell deepened reading how she overcame each successive challenge as she shepherded the book along its way. I chuckled reading the frequent excerpts from Mitchell's genteel yet fierce correspondence. The depth and breadth of this book was impressive and left me rueful for simpler, more civil times.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jill Meyer TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Co-authors Ellen F Brown and John Wiley have produced an incredibly well-researched and well-written book about Margaret Mitchell and her one amazing book, "Gone With The Wind". Brown and Wiley concentrate more on Margaret Mitchell, her husband John Marsh, and other members of her "team" after the book was written than of the actual writing itself. The writing of the book, hereafter referred to as "GWTW", was just the beginning of the story.

Getting the manuscript - which was in bits and pieces in envelopes scattered throughout the Marshes' apartment in Atlanta - to Macmillan Publishers in NYC and then into print in 1935 and 1936 took the efforts of author, publisher, friends, and family members. The most important members of Mitchell's "team" were her father and brother, both Atlanta lawyers. Margaret's brother, Stephens Mitchell, acted as her adviser on all legal matters from her initial dealings with Macmillan, through to movie contracts with David Selznick, and then foreign rights. Stephens, an older brother, survived Margaret who died after being struck by a car on Peachtree Street in 1949. Mitchell's husband was also an important assistant to her in her business dealings.

Because, basically, after the book was written, what followed after "creativity" were "business matters". Publishing rights both domestic and foreign, movie rights, and the all-important "sequel" rights. And, of course, the work of "selling" the book was also "business". Margaret Mitchell, a basically shy woman, did not want to do very much publicity for her book. She was polite to her adoring fans, answering all letters, but she would not "sign" books. She wouldn't speak to groups about her book and she wouldn't be interviewed, either.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Joslin on January 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
While the whole book was phenomenal and informative, the last 3 chapters would make a riveting story in and of themselves. The ongoing saga of legal rights, responsibilities, and the struggle faced by her husband, brother, and later the trusts involved in handling her book and movie rights blew me away. All of this due to the unbelievable novel, Gone With the Wind!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By S. Ozbun on September 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The story of GWTW's journey from hobby to bestselling novel has been written about many times. Any GWTW novice knows how Margaret Mitchell starting writing the book as something to do while she recovered from a broken ankle, wrote pieces of it here and there for years, then gave it to an editor almost as an afterthought. By the time she realized what she had done and, panicking, contacted the editor to say "forget it and send it back!", the guy was already hooked and offered her a contract to finish it. The rest, as the saying goes, is history, and GWTW remains one of the best-loved, bestselling, most influential and culturally iconic novels in American history.

I, however, am not a novice when it comes to GWTW, so I was thrilled to stumble upon this new book Ellen Brown and John Wiley in our local library while looking for yet another historical fiction on medieval England. Unlike so many other books and articles I have read on the subject, this promised to be a thorough look at the odyssey of the book itself - not so much about Margaret Mitchell or how or why she wrote it, but how the book evolved into what it is today.

It was, in a word, fascinating.

Most books probably have an interesting story behind their publication, but GWTW has some specific quirks. Mitchell and her husband John were not novelists, nor were they familiar with the publishing world. They had a different opinion about how things should work, and as such, their approach to the publication and distribution of the book turned some heads in the book business. Mitchell was also terrible protective of her work of art, and she fought unheard of copyright issues around the world to protect her intellectual rights.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood
This item: Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood
Price: $26.95 $20.46
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com