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Marketing High Technology Hardcover – June 2, 1986


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press (June 2, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 002907990X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029079904
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #823,118 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Thomas J. Perkins General Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers Davidow writes about successful product crusades. Indeed, he is a crusader here, but for all marketing, for all companies: a tough challenge but one handled masterfully. This book should be required reading not only for marketeers, but for all those who depend upon successful new products -- from engineers to financiers. -- Review

About the Author

William H. Davidow is a general partner with Mohr Davidow Ventures in Menlo Park, California. Before forming this venture capital firm, he was senior vice president of sales & marketing for Intel Corporation and shepherded the renowned Intel 8080 and 8086 to success. Prior to joining Intel he was a marketing manager for Hewlett-Packard's computer group. Davidow graduated summa cum laude from Dartmouth College and holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

More About the Author

Bill Davidow has been a high-technology industry executive and venture capital investor for more than thirty years, having worked at managerial positions at Intel Corp., Hewlett Packard, and General Electric. He is now an active advisor to Mohr Davidow Ventures, a venture capital firm. An electrical engineer by training, he has earned degrees at Dartmouth College, the California Institute of Technology, and Stanford University and is the author of Marketing High Technology and a coauthor of Total Customer Service and The Virtual Corporation. His most recent book, Overconnected: The Promise and Threat of the Internet, was released January 4, 2011.

Customer Reviews

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See all 26 customer reviews
I was greatly impressed by the book.
Alan Cheung
This is a useful book for all marketers, executives, engineers, and financial decision makers.
J. G. Heiser
If you can read one book to guide you in high tech marketing, this is it.
C. Aras

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By J. G. Heiser on February 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a great guide to success in the high-tech marketplace. Although it predates Geoff Moore's model, it is completely complementary to Moore. Unlike Moore, Davidow goes into much more depth in terms of appropriate marketing activities. This is a useful book for all marketers, executives, engineers, and financial decision makers. It accurately portrays the dangers of making marketing decisions with an engineering mindframe instead of using business concepts.
Davidow's personal experience at Intel was invaluable in making compelling case studies.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Andy Hayler on December 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover
and I have read a few! This is a wonderful, practical book laced with real-life experiences from someone who has been in the marketing trenches at Intel and is now a VC. It is free of consultant jargon and gets straight into pragmatic advice. My only (minor) criticism is that it does tend to assume you are in a large corporation rather than a start-up, but the lessons seem equally valid. So many business books are disappointing, but this one had something useful on almost every page. Well done William Davidow!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alan Cheung on October 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I was greatly impressed by the book. I really can't believe that what I have seen in the book is wriiten by a PhD in electronic engineering! William has no marketing expertise or experience before he join the company HP. Nevertheless, by his extremely strong observation and analytical mind, he had develop a excellent strategy to successfully market high technology. In addition, at the end of the book, he also added 16 factors to evaluate the high-tech marketing plan. As a marketing student, I must confess that, it is much more worthwhile to read this book attending hundreds of hours of lecture! Although one may thought that the book was written in 90s such that the thoeries should be outdated. However, I believe that truth remains true no matter how old it is. So, I will not hesitate to recommend this book to anyone (especially for marketing students)!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The book gives good insight into all the issues regarding marketing High Technology. If one were to think of interfaces, the Marketing <-> Customer interface is explained quite well. However, the interaction between Enginering and Marketing is not discussed in depth. Nonetheless it is a good read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jean-Claude Balland on March 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I first read this book when it was introduced. It was an eye opener, and I never found a better book since to introduce people - be they students or practitioners - to technology marketing. Davidow's definition and explanations of marketing are the best I have ever seen("Marketing must invent complete products and drive them to commending positions in defensible market segments"). It is one of the few that really captures the two side of marketing without verbose statements. His description of the complete product is a classic and the way he relates the program that lead to the victory of Intel over Motorola in the early days of the microprocessor should be a must read for any marketing manager. This is a classic and the fact that it is still in demand 20 years after its first publication is a testimony to its eternal value.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Berry Gibson on December 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This well written book is a good source of classic high tech marketing principles. You should realize before buying that the book is 20 years old. There are many outdated statistics and anecdotes (and interesting prognostications) that while true at the time, seem a little irrelevant today. I found the history of the marketing strategy in the computer processor industry of the 70's and 80's to be fascinating. In the end, though, I wished I had looked at the copyright date of the book before purchasing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paul Marc Oliu on February 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I purchased "marketing High Technology" from Amazon not knowing much about it's author William H. Davidow. I am in the process of learning what are sort of best practices, etc. for marketing technology. So, as far as theory is concerned, I have little to know real knowledge of different schools of thought etc..

Fortunately, I was very surprised to see theory applied to real life. Yes, as many have noted, some of what Mr. Davidow talks about is dated. His was the world of computer chips and hardware... not the internet. Nonetheless, his hands on experience to marketing to this reader seem as timely as ever.

If there is one lesson I've taken from "Marketing High Technology" is that "a product" is created in the marketing department. With all the thought, sweat, etc. that goes into building a device, it only becomes a product until after marketing has properly positioned it within a defined marketplace.

Equally interesting is his understanding of what marketing is supposed to do. From doing the analysis, to the positioning, to defining the buyer, his total view of marketing is certainly timely. A flashy slogan does not suffice.

His approach is also enlightening. Marketing a product for Davidow should be like a crusade... and how you engage your competition is like warfare. After all, especially in the business Davidow thrived in (Intel), the consequences of failure are high.

There are a number of insights within the book. I was especially intrigued by his 16 questions when evaluating a marketing department. After reading them, I understand why he thinks most marketing deparments fail to be what he expects.

An interesting read, especially when he discusses his experiences with Intel, I highly recommend.
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