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Marketing Myopia (Harvard Business Review Classics) Paperback


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Marketing Myopia (Harvard Business Review Classics) + The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives + Leadership and Self-Deception: Getting out of the Box
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Product Details

  • Series: Harvard Business Review Classics
  • Paperback: 90 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press (May 6, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1422126013
  • ISBN-13: 978-1422126011
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 2.5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #362,374 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Theodore Levitt was an influential scholar and former editor of Harvard Business Review whose writings radically altered the way marketing is practiced and studied. He wrote eight books on marketing, including Innovation in Marketing and The Marketing Imagination.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Gerard Kroese on May 14, 2003
Format: Digital
Theodore Levitt was lecturer in Business Administration at the Harvard Business School when this Harvard Business Review Classic was originally published. He now is Professor of Business Administration Emeritus at Harvard Business School.
This article was groundbreaking when it was published originally in 1960. It questions in a new and challenging way by urging organizations to define their industries broadly to take advantage of growth opportunities. "In truth, there is no such thing as a growth industry, I believe. There are only companies organized and operated to create and capitalize on growth opportunities." He discusses the four conditions which are responsible for a self-deceiving cycle of bountiful expansion and undetected decay: (1) increasing population; (2) production pressures; (3) mass production; and (4) dangers of research & development. Each is discussed in detail. During this process, he describes the difference between sales and marketing: "Selling focuses on the needs of the seller, marketing on the needs of the buyer." Levitt use railroads, oil and corner grocery industries to explain his points. The main point he tries to get across is that "the organization must learn to think of itself not a producing goods or services, but as buying customers, as doing the things that will make people want to do business with it." This e-document is complemented with a retrospective commentary by the author, written in 1975.
Fantastic article by Harvard Business School professor Theodore Levitt. It was an eye-opener for many companies in the 1960s and still is the starting point for marketing-courses at business schools. The author claims that most of the ideas within the article are based on works by others, in particular Peter F.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dean M. Alms on December 19, 2009
Format: Digital Verified Purchase
This is a timeless piece. With many great examples of how we get caught up in our own thinking. The best story is how the railroad industry leaders were derailed when the failed to recognize they were in the transportation industry, not the railroad industry. I read this article every year or so just to keep me on my toes. Brilliant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Me from NY on August 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent Book!
Changed the way I though about my business and customers. Helped me realize what my true business is and how to better target my marketing. A must for every small business owner.
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Format: Paperback
Levitt is famous for stating in this article that railroads floundered about 50-years ago because they saw themselves in the railroad business, not the transportation business; similarly with Hollywood more recently - seeing itself in the movie business instead of the entertainment business. However, to contend that railroads could have made serious inroads into trucking and aviation flies in the face of anti-trust law and the often-quoted 'stick to your knitting' rule.

Levitt also says that there is no such thing as a growth industry - only companies organized and operated to create and capitalize on growth opportunities. Industries that assume themselves to be riding some automatic growth escalator invariably descend into stagnation. Four conditions usually guarantee this: 1)The belief that growth is assured by an expanding and more affluent population. 2)The belief there is no competitive substitute for the industry's major product. 3)Too much faith in mass production and the advantages of declining unit costs as output rises. 4)Preoccupation with a product that lends itself to carefully controlled scientific experimentation, improvement, and manufacturing cost reduction.
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