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Marketing Myths That Are Killing Business: The Cure for Death Wish Marketing Paperback – June 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 308 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (June 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070113610
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070113619
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,993,366 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starting with the position that American business sustained severe but avoidable losses during the 1980s, marketing consultants Clancy and Schulman provide an iconoclastic analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of marketing in this nation. Their methodology is controversial: they target 172 major myths that they believe are sapping the vitality of America's business enterprises, including the assumption that "most marketing programs work." The authors expose what they consider to be the faulty logic and managerial fallacies that undermined efforts in the 1980s to cope with planning, research, marketing channels, brand equity, gap analysis and sales force management. While the assessment of myths is engaging and the coverage of positioning and small business issues enlightening, the book frequently leaves the reader wanting more hard data to understand both the problems and the proposed solutions. Fortune Book Club dual main selection.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In this work, Clancy and Shulman, the heads of a marketing strategy group, expose the fallacies of conventional marketing thought--or, as the case may be, the lack of thought. While its practitioners lead people to believe that marketing is high-level science, in actuality marketing today resembles medicine at the start of the 20th century--as many are being harmed as helped by its procedures. The authors cogently mix appropriate theory with practical examples. Parallels can be drawn between Marketing Myths and the writings of Theodore Levitt, Philip Kotler, Robert Townsend, Douglas McGregor, and Peter Drucker. Business is fraught with risk, but risk should be based on sound fundamentals. This work does a fine job in presenting these fundamentals, although a bibliography would have been helpful.
- Steven Silkunas, Southeastern Pennsylvania TA, Philadelphia
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 8, 1997
Format: Paperback
Not only is it easy to read, but it's shocking in its ability to zero in on what's wrong with the marketing business. A must read! For those who want more detail, try reading their first collaborative effort, The Marketing Revolution. Bottom line--if you buy no other marketing book, buy one of these two books. They are Marketing Bibles with enormous power.

Why? Because they lay out in excrutiating detail how marketeers have been relying on well-worn mths to conduct business--myths that have no basis in fact. Thus, is it any wonder that so many marketing efforts either don't work or when they do work can't be explained. I should know. Prior to reading these books, I fell for the same myths. Not any more, thanks to authors Clancy and Shulman.

Gene Pinder
Director of Marketing
U.S. SPACE CAMP
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Adam Lefton on September 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a business consultant, one of the most important things I can do for my clients is to help them overcome their "time honored traditions". While you might think that the need to call in outside consultants is indicative of management's recognition that the current way of doing things isn't working any more, quite often the opposite is true. Organizational inertia, especially in the area of marketing, is often difficult to overcome. This book has helped me countless times in assisting organizations in overcoming "old thinking" and in moving their marketing strategies forward. If you have any questions, please feel free to email me - adamleft@webspan.net.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert on July 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book set me on fire when I first read it. Along with that other masterwork "Marketing Mistakes" this gem of a book is a great antidote to the hype and testosterone that marketing generates. A breath of common sense.

Another great book from Clancy et al. I'd recommend a full set of their books to anyone, not a dud among them. For more of a similar vein try:

- Marketing and the Bottom Line (ISBN: 0273661949)

- Marketing Payback (ISBN: 0273688847)
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Eiad Kassif on November 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
Perhaps this book was good 10 years ago but not in 2005. I read the first few chapters and after several hours of going through the so-called "myths" I just had enough...

Most points they call "myths" are common knowledge to anyone in business or marketing fields (At least NOW).

Again, I am not sure how the situation was 10 years ago but now it is not worth the paper it is printed on.

Many better books are out there so don't waste your time.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Harry Desi on May 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The year 2011 has rolled around. Welcome to the brave new business world which MUST embrace Blogging, Facebook, Twitter and all else that will keep businesses on the straight and narrow---and it will be for the best, for everybody. The "straight and narrow" will not have to be less rewarding, but straying from it may indeed lead to hell. It may well mean fantastic rewards, especially for those businesses who move first and fast into myth-less conduct which frontline employees and customers themselves steer.
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Probably for the first time in their lives, honest sellers have every reason to feel optimistic.
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As a junior in the 1990s working in so many "marketing" jobs, I often had to "market" using methods I found distasteful, and which assumed customers were stupid. Most were not, I should add, and I remember feeling embarrassed to have to conduct myself on the premise that an obviously intelligent prospect could be sold to while being treated like an idiot.
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I believe many people shy away from honest deals and true value purely out of suspicion---they cannot tell between honest deals and those that are not honest. They can hardly be blamed for being wary---dishonesty is indeed killing business, but that has already started to change with the arrival of Internet-based facilities.
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When I first saw this book on the bookshelves, the title itself put my marketing experiences in a nutshell. While reading it, I found so much that so precisely articulated my thoughts and marketing memories.
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One of my brightest marketing triumphs was in a job in which the nature of the work made it necessary for me to be given a lot of freedom in the way I conducted that work---and the most important factor in my approach was to just tell the truth.
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