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Marketplace 3.0: Rewriting the Rules of Borderless Business Hardcover – March 19, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Trade (March 19, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0230342140
  • ISBN-13: 978-0230342149
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,013,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Marketplace 3.0 is highly readable and largely devoid of the jargon that often mars similar efforts. Mikitani gives a well-considered argument for why Rakuten's business model should be the way of the future...Mikitani's vision for the next stage of the online revolution and his conviction that internet companies have a responsibility to drive change for the better may be an inspiration to aspiring digital entrepreneurs."—Financial Times

 

“When [Mikitani] writes about the future of e-commerce, marketers would do well to heed his advice.”—The Dallas Morning News

“A Japanese e-commerce guru tells how to succeed in online business by breaking all the rules… In this upbeat debut, [Mikitani] describes his maverick business philosophy, aimed at challenging conventional wisdom and empowering sellers to create lasting relationships with customers.”—Kirkus Reviews

“Mikitani shares the secrets, beliefs, and drive that fueled Rakuten's meteoric rise to success… [he] weaves an inspiring entrepreneurial story and presents a thought-provoking case for breaking rules.”—Publishers Weekly

"For anybody seeking to understand how to build and scale a company in the new global economy, Hiroshi Mikitani's Marketplace 3.0 provides a compelling guide to Rakuten's success. From Rakuten's early days as an Internet Mall to detailed insights on leveraging social media and providing a path for managers, Mikitani takes you inside the CEO's office with this thorough breakdown of what goes into today's successful global business."—Dick Costolo, CEO, Twitter

"Mikitani is one of the world's great Internet entrepreneurs. He possesses one-of-a-kind insights on the intersection of e-commerce and globalization. In Marketplace 3.0, he describes his vision of the future in compelling fashion and shares his unconventional but hugely effective strategies for competing in a 'borderless business' environment. Highly recommended!"-- Reid Hoffman, co-founder & chairman of LinkedIn and co-author The Start-Up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career

"Hiroshi Mikitani provides exactly the right advice at the right time. His fascinating story of building Rakuten into a global e-commerce giant offers profound and practical lessons for any leader who wants to master the new rules of global competition while also improving the state of the world."--Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Harvard Business School Professor and author of Confidence and SuperCorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation, Profits, Growth and Social Good

"Hiroshi Mikitani is one of the great truly global thinkers in the the business world today. The ideas about leadership, service and commerce in Marketplace 3.0 are profoundly elegant and immediately actionable."--Phil Libin, CEO, Evernote

About the Author

Hiroshi Mikitani is the founder and chief executive of Rakuten, the third largest e-commerce marketplace company in the world, with operations in over a dozen countries across Europe, the Americas and Asia, and ranked 7th among Forbes’ World’s Most Innovative Companies of 2012. An Internet evangelist, he has more than 430,000 followers of his Twitter feed, and has spoken at many events including the eG8 Forum, DLD Conference and Y Combinator’s Startup School. Mikitani has been featured in national and international broadcast and print media, including CNN, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Forbes, The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, The Globe and Mail, The Economist, and the Financial Times, among others. Mikitani received an MBA from Harvard Business School, and in 2012, was presented with one of HBS’s highest honors, the Alumni Achievement Award. He lives in Tokyo, Japan.


More About the Author

Hiroshi Mikitani is Chairman and CEO of Rakuten, Inc., Born in Kobe, Japan, Mikitani earned his undergraduate degree in commerce from Hitotsubashi University in 1988. After graduation, he joined the Industrial Bank of Japan (IBJ), Limited, now Mizuho Corporate Bank, and became an investment banker. While working at IBJ, Mikitani attended Harvard Business School and earned his MBA in 1993, he was also presented with the HBS Alumni Achievement Award in 2012, one of the school's highest honors. In 1995, Mikitani left IBJ and founded Crimson Group the following year, a consulting company, and became its President and CEO. In February of 1997, he founded MDM, Inc. (now Rakuten, Inc.) and became its President and CEO. With only a handful of staff, Mikitani successfully launched the "Rakuten Ichiba" in May of the same year. In June 1999, MDM, Inc. changed its name to Rakuten, Inc. Rakuten, Inc. completed its IPO and was listed on the JASDAQ market in April 2000. Selected by Forbes as 7th among the World's Most Innovative Companies of 2012, Rakuten is expanding globally and currently has operations throughout Asia, Western Europe, and the Americas.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By me on April 30, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
another life story of a successful guy. Techcrunch review was badly misleading. There is no vision or insights. Most of the book is wasted on challenges of converting a Japanese company into international one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jackal on May 15, 2013
Format: Hardcover
CONTENT
I bought this book because I wanted to learn something from a successful executive in Japan. Japan is different so I wanted a different perspective. Unfortunately, even with this minor objective the book disappoints. I am reminded of a number of French executives (e.g. Messier) that wanted to be American style managers some fifteen years back.

Why The Economist had a review of this book is totally beyond understanding.

STYLE
Aping after American ideas is certainly okay, but the author does not have material for an interesting book. Here we have a Harvard Business School educated Japanese that tries to do the same as all other HBS students. The book deals with the author's management approach, and it is written just like any bad American management book; huge fonts, a bunch of very broad examples, no real details, everything will be great by following the recipe. I am not commenting on the successful company, of which the author is the CEO. I am only commenting on the book. If the author would have put a bit of energy into writing, his experience would be quite interesting.

Advice to Japanese authors: In your writing, don't try to be like an American author. You won't be good enough. Be a Japanese author and tell us about your amazingly interesting country. Most people don't care, but you are not going to sell your book to most people. The ones who do care, want to read something unique.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Sean Sheikh on March 31, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Rewriting rules is nothing new to Hiroshi Mikitani. In college, when Mikitani was captain of the tennis team, he quickly abolished the rule that younger players should serve as ball boys to senior players. In 1996, at the age of thirty-one, he broke another rule: he quit his job at the Industrial Bank of Japan. In Japan, it's an unwritten rule that once you are hired by a firm, you dedicate yourself for life.

His against the grain thinking seems to be working. Mikitani is the 4th richest man in Japan, and has turned his firm, Rakuten, into an internet empire. Alongside Uniqlo, he is one of Japan's biggest success stories in the last 10 years. In Marketplace 3.0, he discusses his business philosophy with respect to company culture, acquisitions, and where e-commerce is heading.

Mikitani is strongly against the 'vending machine' model of the internet. By vending machine, he means you find something online, you give your credit card information, and out comes something delivered. Marketplace 3.0 is still about finding things easily that are competitively priced, but making things more fun and personal. Not all buying decisions are based on price. This is the same in the digital world, as the physical world. People like a human touch. This is why people become regulars at stores and restaurants. Remembering peoples tastes, preferences, and having a personal story helps customer loyalty.

Although active in acquisitions (Buy.com, Kobo, etc), Rakuten made headlines around the world in 2010 for introducing 'Englishnization', changing the official company language from Japanese to English. Even within board meetings with all Japanese people, Mikitani would deny executives to use Japanese. For the policy to work, it had to be strictly enforced.
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Format: Hardcover
This was an interesting read. I appreciate Mikitani's approach to business, in that he acknowledges hard truths, and doesn't hesitate to act.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Insightful and solidly argumented, this book serve as an inspiration for anyone willing to become part of the global marketplace. Mr. Mikitani shares his experience to redefine the rules of commerce in the Internet age and being an accountable corporate global citizen. Highly recommended!!
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