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Marling Menu-Master for France (Marling menu masters series) Paperback – June 1, 1971


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Frequently Bought Together

Marling Menu-Master for France (Marling menu masters series) + The Marling Menu-Master for Italy: A Comprehensive Manual for Translating the Italian Menu into American-English (Marling menu masters series) + The Marling Menu-Master for Spain: A Comprehensive Manual for Translating the Spanish Menu into American English (Marling menu masters series)
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Product Details

  • Series: Marling menu masters series
  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Altarinda Books (June 1971)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0912818034
  • ISBN-13: 978-0912818030
  • Product Dimensions: 3.7 x 5.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #149,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

I think this is a very handy book.
K. Reshkin
This book is totally unnecessary in Paris (I'm unsure about the rest of France).
Beautifile
I will be able to read and understand the French menu's.
Sherrys Treasures

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Don't be put off by the publish date on this book which seems a bit outdated. I just returned (6/2000) from France and found this book to be not only helpful but almost completely necessary. My French isn't bad, but this book even tells you what chicken "a la provencale" actually means. It doesn't just translate it as "chicken, prepared the way they do in Provence." I found it to be so reliable that I have just ordered the Italy Menu Master for my next trip. My only slight concern with it was the food is grouped only by "meat," "fish," etc. So if you don't know what type of food something on the menu is, it can be a little hard to find. But combining it with a pocket dictionary solved that problem.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book (and the others in the series - Germany, Italy, Spain) can make the quite often mystifying process of ordering food in a foreign country understandable.
The book - more of a booklet - is small; so, both you and it will travel well together. So, don't miss out on one of the most important experiences of a country - it's food!
Remember in France, food is not an art, it's a religion! So before ordering the andouille, look it up - "sausage composed of strips of pig's small intestines." Umm, maybe something else.
Bon appetit.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence E. Wilson on November 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
No matter how well (or how poorly) you may speak French, this little book is an indispensable addition to your travel kit. It can help you navigate the dizzying varieties of delicious sauces, the hundreds of preparation styles, the regional specialities, and keep you from ordering kidneys when you thought you were asking for veal cutlets...Helpful pages, too, on money, numbers, basic traveller's phrases. Plus it's small enough to be consulted with discretion at cafes or bistros...and don't forget how helpful it would be for ordering with confidence in your favorite French restaurant back home.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By K. Reshkin on February 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
I think this is a very handy book. It's thin, reasonably priced, and is a great help with inscrutable menus. I remember being embarrassed when some of my father's colleagues came to visit me in Strasbourg and we went out to eat and I was trying to help them with the menus. Despite my years of French and really good fluency in the spoken language, all I knew about "pommes dauphinois" was that it was Dauphin style potatoes, whatever that was! This little book would have come to my rescue in those situations.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Conrad H. Weisert on November 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
The specialized terminology of French cuisine is rarely found in any pocket dictionary. I carry this little pocket guide not only in France, but also when dining in authentic French restaurants in the USA.
If you know little or no French, you can consult this guide and the menus posted outside most French restaurants, and decide what you're going to order before you even go inside.
The unfortunate use of "entrée" for "main course" may lead to confusion outside the USA.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
Just stopped by to order the Marling Menu Masters for the other countries and thought I'd tell you not to leave home without it! I agree - I don't know how anyone survives eating in Europe without this. It has been reprinted every two or three years since 1971 and never gets outdated. It really is pocket sized, very slim - 1/4" max, light enough to carry in an evening bag, and has a light plastic cover. It is divided into seven categories (in French):horsd'oeurves, soups, eggs, fish, entrees, vegetables and desserts and fruits. Also, at the front, is a chapter on eating in France that will tell you all sorts of handy dandy info like the difference between a cafe, bistro and brasserie or how and when to tip. It is arranged by French to English so you can determine, for instance, that 'agneau' is lamb. You do not need to speak the language to use this - although I agree with the previous review on rare occasions needing to cross reference with a dictionary (this if you cannot determine from the menu that 'agneau' would come under the heading of entree. However, you can just quickly leaf through each of the seven sections under 'A' to find the food). It has a huge number of dishes referenced and more importantly, sauces. With this little book you will be able to choose and truly enjoy the foods of France from bistros to five star gourmet establishments.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark C. Flynn on January 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
With marginal knowledge of French, best expressed as "Parlez-vous Anglais?", thanks to our host we have discovered this valuable book and plan to buy our own copy in the US. Best to familiarize oneselves with French terms for common meats and fishes ahead of time. However, anyone has dined in French restaurants will find the added detail needed to decipher most French menus and preperations.
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27 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Hundedrek on June 4, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I rated it a "one" only because there is no zero or minus option. We just returned from three weeks in France and in our opinion this cute little book was nearly useless when trying to decode menus. We survived thanks to a combination of English-speaking wait-staffs and Rick Steves' French Phrase Book. The large number of omitted items is forgiveable--after all, this is a small book. What dooms this book is its unwieldy organization. Seven main sections, several of which are further subdivided, make the book a navigational nightmare. It is frustrating to have to wade through it page by page only to find that what you are looking for is not there. The book should be organized like Larousse Gastronomique--one global alphabetical list with pertinent cross-references. Also, we believe that the authors should actually visit Paris and Provence to observe the changes in menu lingo that has occurred since 1971 when the book was compiled. I say don't buy this book--instead, use the money to buy a bottle of wine. You'll get a lot more value from the wine.
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